Home
FDA Warns on Pet Exposure to Topical Pain Meds
Creams can sicken and kill animals

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting pet owners who use prescription topical pain medications containing flurbiprofen to use care when using them (on humans) in a household with pets.

Pets are at risk of illness and death when exposed to certain pain medications applied to the skin of their owners. Even very small amounts of flurbiprofen, such as a slight amount left on a cloth applicator, could be dangerous to pets.

This advice follows reports made to the FDA of cats in two households that became ill or died after their owners used prescription-strength topical medications containing flurbiprofen on themselves to treat muscle, joint, or other pain. The pet owners had applied the cream or lotion to their own neck or feet, and not directly to the pet, and it is not known exactly how the cats became exposed to the medication.

The products contained the flurbiprofen and the muscle relaxer cyclobenzaprine, as well as other varying active ingredients, including baclofen, gabapentin, lidocaine, or prilocaine. Flurbiprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

People are warned to keep all medicines out of reach from their companion animals. With any sort of cream, lotion, or ointment, keep any applicators or cloths with the drug away from pets and be mindful of any drug that falls to the floor. If your pet experiences lack of desire to eat, lethargy, vomiting, or tarry stools, and you suspect exposure to such pain creams, bathe the animal and seek veterinary care immediately. Inform the veterinarian of the potential for flurbiprofen exposure.

Forbes also reports that:

Not included in the FDA warning is that no topical prescription product exists with these combinations. While the drug combinations are still prescribed by physicians, they are formulated at compounding pharmacies. These tailor-made, individual products are advertised for treatment of neck and back pain, tendon inflammation, and myalgia (muscle pain). Applying them directly to the skin allows for greater concentrations of the drugs to penetrate to the desired site of action while minimizing the toxicity to the rest of the body if large doses were taken orally.

Veterinarians with patients suspected of NSAID toxicity should ask whether flurbiprofen-containing products are used in the household.

As our dogs, the FDA warning states, “Understand that, although the FDA has not received reports of dogs or other pets becoming sick in relation to the use of topical pain medications containing flurbiprofen, these animals may also be vulnerable to NSAID toxicity after being exposed to these medications.”

- Store all medications safely out of the reach of pets.

- Pet owners who use topical pain medications containing flurbiprofen should take care to prevent exposure of the pet to the medication.

- Consult your health care provider on whether it is appropriate to cover up the treated area to prevent your pet from being exposed.

- Safely discard or clean any cloth or applicator that may retain medication and avoid leaving any residues of the medication on clothing, carpeting or furniture.

- If you are using topical medications containing flurbiprofen and your pet becomes exposed, bathe or clean your pet as thoroughly as possible and consult a veterinarian.

- If your pet shows signs such as lethargy, lack of appetite, vomiting, or other illness, seek veterinary care for your pet and be sure to provide the details of the exposure.

- Pet owners and veterinarians can also report any adverse events to the FDA.

Note that even very small exposure to flurbiprofen can be potentially life-threatening to pets.

Almost Your Dog’s Name
Which monikers were near misses?

A college friend of mine got his first dog at the age of five, so naturally he wanted to name his new best friend Big Bird. His Dad objected, saying there was no way that he was going to stand on his front porch and call out, “Big Bird, Come!” His Dad was dignified and manly, so this would indeed have seemed incongruous. However, he was also an incredibly kind man who was willing to meet his son halfway. Following some discussion, my friend named his puppy after another Sesame Street character instead. Grover lived a long and happy life, and when he was buried, he was covered with about a foot of dirt and even more tears. Thanks to the change in plans, he never suffered the embarrassment of a silly name.

Many dogs have had similar near misses in nomenclature. We had some friends who were seriously considering the name Lucy for a new puppy that would be arriving soon. However, the husband’s tendency to make up nicknames put the kibosh on that idea. His wife was fine with Luscious, Lucy Lou, Lucille and LuLu, but when he added Lucifer to his growing list, she was not okay with that. She requested that they come up with a name that shared no nicknames with the devil. Maggie came home a week later.

A former co-worker of mine adopted a dog one day before her nephew was born, and named her pup T.J., which didn’t stand for anything in particular. She just wanted to use initials and liked the way T.J. sounded. Luckily, she didn’t have a chance to share this name with her family members before the baby news came. Why is that lucky? Because her new nephew was named Tajinder, for which Teejay is a common nickname. After considering A.J., B.J. and D.J., she eventually just reversed the original initials and named her dog J.T. Family conflict averted!

Have you ever almost settled on a dog name only to change your mind at the last minute for some reason?

Urban Canine Good Citizen Test
AKC adds a new set of skills for city dwelling pups.

I've long wished that the American Kennel Club's Canine Good Citizen test would grant well behaved pets more privileges. Why should a few unruly pups ban all dogs from apartment complexes, parks, and other community spaces? It's not a magic solution, but it's a start. Since 1989, more than 700,000 dogs have passed the test, which requires pets to demonstrate manners such as sitting politely for petting and walking on a loose leash.

This month the AKC introduced a new level of the CGC test called the Urban Canine Good Citizen, which focuses on the special skills that city-dwelling dogs need. The Urban CGC can only be taken by dogs that already have their CGC certification and is comprised of ten parts in a public area:

  • Exiting/entering a doorway (of a dog friendly building) without pulling
  • Walking through a crowd on a busy urban sidewalk
  • Reacting appropriately to city distractions (horns, sirens, etc.)
  • Waiting on leash at a crosswalk and crossing the street under control
  • Ignoring food and food containers on sidewalk
  • Allowing a person to approach on a sidewalk and pet the dog
  • Staying in a 3-minute down in the lobby of a dog friendly building
  • Safely negotiating stairs and elevators
  • Being housetrained
  • Entering/exiting and riding dog-friendly transportation (car, subway in a carry bag, taxi)

The first Urban CGC test was administered by the Obedience Training Club of Palm Beach County at the pet friendly shopping mall CityPlace, where dogs had to walk by teenagers on skateboards, wait patiently while their handlers ate lunch at an outdoor cafe, and hop into a taxi. Moving the CGC test from the classroom to a public space also results in some good publicity for well behaved pups!

Norman Rockwell Moments
The charm of dogs in daily life

I love few things more than seeing a dog lying on a rug in front of the fire. This is due in part, perhaps, to my perspective as a canine behaviorist. While most people simply see a dog relaxing on a rug, I see a dog who is resting on the rug rather than chewing on it.  That automatically puts the scene on my “things of beauty” list.

Apart from my own issues with, well, canine issues, most dog lovers find the scene appealing as well. It ranks right up there with a dog physically preventing a toddler from going in the street, playing happily with a group of children or comforting a grieving person of any age by gently resting the head in that person’s lap. Any time people and dogs are spending time together as companions, I’m likely to observe the scene and find it endearing.

There is no end to the situations in which I find charm as well as joy in the actions or poses of dogs. I suppose I have been influenced by the work of Norman Rockwell, whose art captures the appeal of American life, including dogs, better than anyone ever has. Rockwell was well known for including dogs in his paintings and understanding the happiness people felt when seeing images of all kinds of dogs portrayed as a part of daily life.

His work is so well known that to describe something as a “Norman Rockwell moment” is instantly understandable to most people as a situation (often in a small town) that provides suitable material for one of his paintings. What’s your favorite “Norman Rockwell moment” with your own dog?

Creative Shelter Dog Photos
Playful pictures boost adoption rates in Utah.






















Good photographs can make all the difference in successful adoption rates. Even my local city run shelter has started taking pictures of dogs against a wall with painted flowers or wearing bandannas. Fortunately many rescue organizations are lucky enough to have professional photographers lending their talents to the cause. But one shelter in Utah has been taking canine glamour shots to a new level.

Photographer Guinnevere Shuster, a volunteer with the Humane Society of Utah, came up with the idea to take photo booth style portraits of dogs to capture the many aspects of their personalities. Guinnevere wanted the pictures to change people's perceptions of shelter pups and showcase some of the harder-to-adopt animals. Now the shelter has a 93 percent adoption rate!

This wasn't her only creative photo venture at the humane society. Earlier this year Guinnevere started another photo project to highlight the notoriously hard to adopt dark furred pups. In this series, the dogs were highlighted with a glowing light and homemade flower crowns. Since the photos were posted in January, six of the eight pups featured were adopted, including two 10-year old Labrador Retrievers who had received no interest previously, despite being featured on the Humane Society's weekly television spot.

Since then, many shelters and rescue organizations have reached out to Guinnevere for tips on how to creatively photograph their own homeless pets. I hope that these incredible pictures inspire more photographers to get involved with their local shelters and encourage more people to consider adoption.

Tax Deduction for Shelter Pups
New York lawmakers propose tax credit to encourage adoption.

As we enter the height of the tax season, it's natural to think about getting some relief related to the countless dollars we spend each year on our pups. Getting a tax break on pet care has been proposed before, without success, but recently there has been new energy around getting a law passed. This time the relief would be specific to rescue pups. Deductions related to fostering is already allowed, but does not include expenses related to adoption.

Since January, four bills have been drafted in New York State that would offer a tax credit to residents who adopt a pet. City Councilwoman Julissa Ferreras says that the tax credit would encourage more people to adopt, bringing relief to the state's shelters. She estimates that 3 million animals in New York shelters are euthanized each year due to overcrowding.

  • S4576-2015, sponsored by Sen. Phil Boyle, R-Nassau County, would offer $100 per dog or cat, with a maximum of 3 adopted pets covered per household
  • S2894A-2015, sponsored by Sen. Kevin Parker, D-Brooklyn, would offer $100 per dog, cat, or other animal, with a maximum of 3 pets
  • A5182-2015, sponsored by Assemblymember Alec Brook-Krasny, D-Brooklyn, would offer a single $350 credit for a dog or cat
  • S3670-2015, sponsored by Sen. Patty Ritchie, R-Heuvelton, would offer $500 per household pet, with a maximum of 3 pets — which means a credit of up to $1,500

If one of these bills is approved and signed by the governor, it would make New York the first state in the nation to offer a tax credit like this. I certainly welcome anything that will get adoption numbers up, but I'm also sensitive to the fact that state budgets are already stretched thin. In 2012, a similar bill was defeated in Pennsylvania by a tiny margin--97-96, so it's clearly a divided issue.

Are you for the adoption tax credit?

Breed Identification By Coat
Dog fur brings back grooming memories

Having dog fur on the brain is common for me. In fact, it’s my normal state, like dog fur on my clothes, and highly preferable to dog fur on my tongue. (I love dogs, but I hate it when they shed and it ends up in my mouth. Ugh! Not only does it feel weird, but it interferes with my ability to enjoy chocolate and that is simply not okay.)

Because I worked as a dog groomer for a year, I feel nearly as familiar with dog coats as I do with dog behavior, which is my real specialty. So, when I saw an online quiz titled “Can You Tell The Dog By Its Fur,” I had to take it. There are countless quizzes out there and I usually avoid them because of the time sink that they are, but this one was irresistible. There was self-imposed pressure not to miss any, and I’m happy to report that my grooming time was not in vain—I knew all 12 coats well enough to answer correctly.  I suspect many dog people will have similar success.

Of course, not everyone will think of the coats the same way I do, but I hope my fellow groomers will.

  • Where others may see a smooth coat, I see an easy-to-groom coat that does not need to be bathed often and will easily air dry in a reasonable amount of time. Low maintenance coats have their advantages!
  • What’s a wire coat to many people is a please-don’t-make-me-strip-it coat to me. I know that stripping can prevent mats, but so can regular grooming and the use of conditioner if you get behind. I know this is controversial—many people prefer the look and feel of these coats when they are stripped—but I worry about how hard it is on dogs.
  • Whenever a curly-coated dog came into the shop where I worked, my response was honestly, “I hope another groomer has time for this dog today!” Clipping these dogs is for the highly skilled, and the other women in the shop were better artists than I was with more practice. I could do a passable job, but I would have needed more experience to guarantee that I could make them look their very best every time. With curly fur, I see a beautiful coat as much as the next person, but I also see a serious challenge.
  • It’s impossible for me to see a long-haired coat and not think of all the tools needed to prevent or work out mats. A pin brush and a smooth bristle brush along with a lot of conditioner, a good detangler and a dryer with several different settings are usually involved in grooming these dogs. Long-haired dog who are brushed daily often have gorgeous coats in beautiful shape. However, many people who brought their dogs to us only brushed infrequently or brushed just the top layer, leaving many hidden mats.
  • What looks like a lush double coat to most people looks like an oh-boy-that-will-take-a-lot-of-time-with-the-dryer coat to me. Double coats can be long or short, and both can stay damp a long time without a lot of time with a high-quality dryer—though of course this is usually a far bigger issue with the longer double coats. As a groomer, one of my first lessons was to allow plenty of time to dry these dogs.

When I see dogs, I am often impressed with the beauty of their coats. That may simply reflect my personal experience with how much work it can take to keep them looking that way. Or, it may just be that I know fur and I love it.

Missing the Dogs

I was on vacation in a tropical paradise with the love of my life. One whole week with perfect weather and no responsibilities, no work stresses and no heavy uniform. I lay on shore with the sun on my skin, my toes in the sand and wearing nothing but a floral sundress. My darling husband sat beside me and our hands were intertwined. The whales were playing off shore and turtles and tropical fish were visible from my chair. The balmy breeze tickled my skin and the palm trees and blue green waters were picture perfect.

I was having the time of my life. Still there was a longing, unfulfilled, that rears its head frequently during the week. There aren’t many dogs where we are, nestled among our fellow vacationers. Mostly retirees with their chest high Bermuda shorts and some families with kids out for spring break. Hardly a dog to be seen. When I see a dog trotting along with a local, I stare shamelessly, eagerly, like a kid in a candy store.  

Babies and dogs bring up similar feelings in me, powerful maternal things, a longing to touch, embrace and connect on a deeper level. I try to hold back, feeling ridiculous at the desire to fawn over every dog I see. I’m an animal control officer for heaven’s sake. I work with dogs all day, every day. I have four dogs of my own and always have foster dogs or puppies at home. You would think I would get over it, or at least be able to get through a week’s vacation without feeling the need to throw myself at every dog I see. I mostly hold back, both out of respect for the dog’s space and for the owners.

Thankfully my dog withdrawal is somewhat eased by an adorable brown poodle cheerfully greeting shoppers in an outdoor market. I restrain myself but he sees me watching him and prances over and lets my husband and I adore him close up, tousling his curly coat and laughing as he licks our hands.

The next day I see a big hunky pit bull lounging in the shade near the beach with his person. I catch his eye and he bounces over, muscles rippling and a huge doggy grin on his face. Some dogs don’t like close contact but this big marshmallow of a boy burrows his big head into me, snuggling and wiggling as close as he can. He’s one of those mushy dogs who can’t get enough human attention and I can’t get enough of dogs so we have a happy little love fest for a few moments. Finally he tears himself away and back to his owner leaving me with my dog fix temporarily satisfied.  

I think I must have been born with the desire to connect with dogs. I’ve always been drawn to them like a moth to a flame. Some people develop it later in life and are equally smitten but either way, I can’t imagine life without dogs. They are just such an incredible gift.

When were you hit with the doggy bug? Has it always been there or was there a turning point that made you a dog lover?

Billie Holiday and Her Dogs on Her 100th Birthday

This week marks the centennial (April 7, 1915) of one of America’s greatest and most individualist artists, Billie Holiday. Considered the greatest jazz vocalist of all time, Holiday’s distinctive vocal style made her musicianship equal to the titans of the golden era—Benny Goodman, Count Basie, Artie Shaw, Lester Young—all musical collaborators with the great “Lady Day.” Her troubled life, drug addiction and arrests, could not overshadow one of the most creative legacies of the 20th century. Holiday’s influence still reverberates today. A constant presence in her later years were her dogs—Mister, a Boxer and Pepi, a Chihuahua. They no doubt provided comfort during uncertain times, and the love that echoes throughout many of her songs.

Mister and Billie Holiday, 1946. William P. Gottlieb/Libray of Congress
Pepi and Billie Holiday, 1957. Bob Willoughby/Redferns

Yoga and a Fearful Dog
Fittingly, it helped her relax

We all know that many people see the great value of yoga for relaxing, reducing stress, lowering blood pressure and developing a more positive outlook. Many people are also fully on board with the idea that Doga (the practice of yoga with pet dogs) has similar benefits for dogs and guardians alike. Still, I was caught off guard with the amazing effects of my own yoga practice on a fearful dog who is spending the week at our house.

Peanut is a brindle terrier mix who is spooked by many things, Though she adores dogs and loves to play with them, she is on the nervous side with people. Additionally, loud sounds or unfamiliar objects give her pause. She is sweet, gentle and smart, so we enjoy having her in our lives. However, we have concerns about her well being when she visits. She is not at her most comfortable here when compared to how she is at her own home with her own guardians.

We are on day 6 of her visit, and she has become progressively more comfortable. Some of that is probably a function of simply getting used to her new surroundings, but much of it is a result of our purposeful efforts. We are using treats and toys as part of a counter classical conditioning program to help her overcome her fears. We are working hard to avoid surprising her, and we are doing our best to have her out of the house on a walk when anyone is practicing the trumpet, French horn or saxophone. We speak gently to her, let her approach us and make sure she never feels trapped by us in a corner or in a narrow hallway. Using our “Fearful Dog 101” skills has no doubt helped her, but yoga did even more.

On her second day here, I did a short yoga routine, and the instant I began, she trotted over and sat down next to me. (Prior to that moment, she rarely approached, and spent a lot of her time in rooms that were unoccupied.) From my first pose, I could see that she was more relaxed than she had been and more comfortable being close to me. Her guardians regularly practice yoga, so my best guess is that the familiarity of yoga was the key factor.

Now, I am taking advantage of how yoga affects Peanut to make life easier and less stressful for us all. When we’re in the backyard and I need her to come in, I can do a downward dog inside the doorway, and she’ll come right over to me. If I want to leash her up for a walk, a child’s pose is inviting. When a few too many visitors came over to watch a basketball game, and she ran to hide under our bed, I went to our room and did a short routine, which drew her out and improved her emotional state.

Most dogs become less afraid when play and treats are used thoughtfully and carefully in a program to help them overcome their fears. Peanut is unusual in that yoga seems to work better. Have you had a fearful dog who improved in response to something unexpected?

Delta Adds Pet Tracking to Select Flights
New gadget relays real time data to people traveling with their pups.

















Flying with pets in cargo is nerve wracking, no matter how short the trip or how perfect the weather conditions. While fees have gone up in recent years, there haven't been a lot of improvements in how large pets fly. In some cases, a seat inside the cabin could cost less than the fee for a dog to travel in cargo. It continues to be an extremely frustrating topic for animal lovers.

Starting this week Delta Airlines has added a service to help give traveling pet parents peace of mind. A new gadget, available for $50 per flight from ten U.S. airports, is attached to crates to provide real time data on the surrounding temperature, what position the animal is in, and the kennel orientation. If the temperature rises above 85 degrees Fahrenheit, the device will send an alert to Delta's call center. The statistics can also be checked by through a web site.

The major limitation so far is that the system can only send alerts before and after a flight because restrictions on cellular communication while airborne. Still, the device is useful since many mishaps with temperature control happen on the tarmac. However, I think that this tracking service should be included for all pets traveling in cargo.

The gadget doesn't appear to have GPS capability, but given the stories of pets lost on the runway, this would be a good feature for the next version.

According to Transportation Department data, animal deaths have been down among U.S. carriers over the last few years. In 2014, U.S. airlines reported 17 animal deaths, down from 39 in 2010. This doesn't include lost pets, like Ty, the American Staffordshire Terrier that escaped while flying with Delta in October and hasn't been seen since

Delta's gadget isn't perfect by a long shot, but I hope that this is the beginning of a trend to make flying safer with pets.

Dog Trainers Love Mops
Especially this one!

As a dog trainer, mopping is a way of life. For years after group classes, the routine was the same—sweep, mop, then hit my clothes with a lint roller. If I’d had a mop this big (Click here to see the video) to clean the training center, my job would have gone so much faster!

It’s impossible to ignore the resemblance of a Komondor or a white Puli (which is less common than black or gray) to a mop, although the video purposely seeks to fool us. Hungarian livestock-guarding breeds, the Komondor and the Puli are officially considered national treasures. I have only met a handful of Komondors and even fewer Pulis in all my years of training, and watching this video reminded me of each one.

Have you ever met or lived with either one?

Dogs in Advertising
Loving this trend!

My keys have two personal items with them: a miniature Kong and a keychain from Run Flagstaff, my local running store. That pretty much sums up my two main interests in life—training dogs and the sport of running. Any time the two of them come together, it makes me very happy, which is why I was so pleased to see their new window display.

In addition to making me happy, it made me think, too. Dogs have become ubiquitous in advertising by businesses both large and small. Of course, the recent Budweiser puppy commercials are extremely popular now, but Bud Light began using Bull Terrier Spuds Mackenzie in their marketing campaign almost 30 years ago. Beer is far from the only industry to call on dogs to promote their products. Perhaps the most famous dog in recent advertising history is the Chihuahua who appeared in so many Taco Bell ads.

Though both these famous dogs were represented as male dogs in their commercials, they were actually females. The real name of “Spuds” was Honey Tree Evil Eye, while the Taco Bell dog’s real name was Gidget.

In recent years, dogs have appeared in about a third of all television commercials, and always figure prominently in the ones appearing during the Super Bowl. The appeal of dogs to consumers is the main motivation for casting them, but it also save companies money because dogs are not paid nearly as much as human actors in most cases.

One of my favorite commercials (at least at this moment—I do change my mind regularly) with dogs is the one for Volkswagon called The Bark Side that had dogs barking the Imperial March from Star Wars and one dog dressed as an Imperial Walker. I particularly love the shout-out to Chewbacca at 36 seconds.

Another truly excellent commercial featuring dogs also includes a host of other species, but the dog moments, especially the ones with a dog and an orangutan, are my favorite.

This commercial, Android: Friends Furever, celebrates diversity and differences with the tag line, “Be together, not the same.” I love it (even if I do have an iPhone.) In addition to dogs, this ad features cats, ducks, a lion, a rhinoceros, elephants, a dolphin, sheep, horses, a baboon, goats, deer, a hyrax, a tortoise, a tiger, a bear, a meerkat, and a cockatoo. However, it is worth noting that no species gets greater air time than the dog, who is in two-thirds of the commercial, probably because it elicits the happy, favorable response that companies want people to associate with their products.

Do you have a favorite commercial that features a dog?

Dog Saves Puppies in Forest Fire
A canine miracle lifts the spirits of displaced residents in Chile.

As a forest fire ripped through Valparaiso, Chile earlier this month, thousands of residents were told to evacuate. However, one mother seemed to know there was no chance of escaping to safety with her babies and came up with an alternate plan. The mixed breed dog was seen leading her 2-week old puppies away from flames, digging a hole under a large metal container, and burying them inside. The mama then stood watch in a protective corner.

After the fire was contained, paramedics and volunteers dug out the puppies and named the hero mom Negita ("Blacky"). It took nearly an hour to recover all of the pups from the deep hole. Mom and babies were all healthy and are now being cared for by volunteers. Thankfully, with all the media attention they've been getting, I'm sure they'll find forever homes soon.

Negita's brave actions brought uplifting news to displaced residents who saw the story as a miracle amid the destruction and loss. The fire was believed to have started in an illegal landfill, and has killed one person and seriously injured five firefighters. Fortunately the fire is now contained and Valparaiso can begin recovering.

What Deer?
Dog ignores attempts at interaction

Dogs who are not social around other dogs may react to them by barking, growling, lunging, yelping or running away. Their behavior makes it obvious that something is upsetting them. For some dogs who are just as disinterested in playing with other dogs, their response is far subtler: They act like no dog is around, as in, “Dog? What dog? I don’t see any dog.” They may be afraid of those other dogs or they may simply lack even the slightest interest in them.

The dog in this video is showing what it looks like to ignore someone, although the animal being ignored is a deer, not another dog. It’s unimaginable that this dog is not aware of the deer’s presence, yet he completely ignores it. His behavior seems the same as it would be if he hadn’t noticed the deer yet. It’s hard to say if the dog is completely disinterested in the deer or finds it annoying.

 

Dogs who ignore deer are extremely rare, but ignoring other dogs is hardly a common reaction, either. Over the years, I’ve seen it quite a few times, but it’s unusual enough to capture my attention every time. Sometimes a dog is nonchalant about other dogs and may genuinely have no interest in them. In such cases, dogs may be completely focused on their guardians, or perhaps on a toy. (“Nothing in the world exists except my ball and whoever is throwing it!”)

In other cases, the dog is so afraid of dogs that he actively avoids looking in their direction. When extreme fearfulness is involved, the dog will turn away from the other dogs over and over, no matter how often they move around and into his field of view. The constant looking away can make them look like bobbleheads, which would be amusing if it were not for the fact that they are clearly afraid enough to be in serious distress.

If your dog ignores other dogs without having been trained to do so, is it because he doesn’t care about other dogs or because he’s too scared to look at them?

Shirley Zindler

Karen B. London

Karen B. London

JoAnna Lou

Editors

Karen B. London

JoAnna Lou

JoAnna Lou

Karen B. London

Karen B. London

Karen B. London

Karen B. London

JoAnna Lou

Letters

JoAnna Lou

JoAnna Lou

Karen B. London

Karen B. London

Editors

JoAnna Lou