Home
The Bark
News: Guest Posts
Brushless Oral Care
SPONSORED
Brushless Oral Care

What is Oratene Brushless Oral Care?

Oratene was created by the developer of Biotene, the #1 dentist recommended product for people with Dry Mouth. Oratene has been formulated specially for pets and based on the same 35+ year enzyme technology. Formerly known at Biotene Veterinarian Brushless Oral Care, Oratene features patented, dual enzyme systems which offer superior brushless oral care to help eliminate odor-causing bacteria and plaque biofilm.

Who will benefit most from Oratene?

All pets will benefit from Oratene but is especially beneficial to pets on medications.

What's the medication connection?

Just like people, pets can develop a condition called Dry Mouth (Xerostomia) due to their medications. Medications can alter the protective benefits of saliva by affecting the quantity or more importantly, the quality. Dry Mouth can lead to bacterial overgrowth, periodontal diseases, inflamed gums and even tooth loss.

What types of medications can contribute to Dry Mouth?

Some of the most common classifications are: Anti-hypertensive/diuretic/cardiac, behavior/anti-anxiety, incontinence, NSAIDs/Pain, anticonvulsants.

What is an indicator a pet may have Dry Mouth?

Halitosis and plaque are the most common; however, there are many others such as thick saliva, inflamed gums, periodontal disease and tooth loss.

Can both dogs and cats use it? Is there an age restriction?

Oratene is formulated to be safe for dogs and cats of any age. Does not contain Xylitol, alcohol, chlorine or toothstaining chlorhexidine so it is safe and recommended for everyday use.

Find a Retailer

News: Editors
Mary Tyler Moore: A Loss for Fans and Animals

Television fans (and working women in particular) are mourning the passing of actress Mary Tyler Moore. She is the rare individual who not only entertained but inspired generations with her characters’ independence, smarts and spunk. The actress will also be missed by her beloved animals—the menagerie of cats and dogs she shared her home with, and the legions of animals saved through Broadway Barks, the animal rescue event/organization she founded in New York with her friend Bernadette Peters. The star-studded event benefits New York City animal shelters and adoption agencies, while educating New Yorkers on the plight of the thousands of homeless dogs and cats in the metropolitan area. In July, Broadway Barks celebrated its 18th annual fundraiser, contributing to 27 organizations and adopting out over 200 animals. The event and organization will continue as a living testament to the love and spirit of Mary Tyler Moore, actress, producer, philanthropist and activist.

Culture: DogPatch
James Rebanks Talks Sheepdogs and the Shepherding Way of Life
The Shepherd’s View
Shepherding Way of Life, views from the field of border collie

Last year, in his Bark review of James Rebanks’ remarkable memoir, The Shepherd’s Life, Donald McCaig observed, “It isn’t really a book about dogs. It’s about a world the dogs make possible. It’s the best book I’ve read this year.” Other reviewers also sang its praises; for example, New York Times literary critic Michiko Kakutani called it “utterly compelling,” and named it one of the Top 10 Books of 2015 (it was also on our list). So, we were thrilled to see that Rebanks has a new book, The Shepherd’s View: Modern Photographs from an Ancient Landscape, replete with his lovely and compelling photography and poetic essays. On its pages, he shares with us a unique view of the pastoral world of England’s Lake District. We caught up with him recently to find out more about these working dogs and his remarkable partners, Floss and Tan, the sheepdogs who help him tend the flock.

Bark: Where would shepherds would be without sheepdogs—would it even be possible to do the job without them?

James Rebanks: A shepherd isn’t a shepherd without a sheepdog, just a fool running round achieving nothing on a mountain. Sheep are quicker than people, and on their own terrain, impossible to manage without a good sheepdog. To gather the flocks on our mountains (we call them fells) takes 5 to 10 shepherds and shepherdesses, and 20 or more sheepdogs. They are our main tool, and key to what we do.

BK: How can you tell if a dog will be good in the field? Is it breeding? Are skills passed along genetically?

JR: We start training dogs when they are very young, so they learn their names and to come to us. They progress as the months go by, until they are fully trained at about two years old. My youngest dog, Meg, is a year-and-a-half and can do nearly all the work of my mature dogs, Floss and Tan. She has learned from them. Well-bred dogs from good families are incredibly gifted, and show their raw talent and focus as puppies. So I think a lot of the instinct is there, waiting to be harnessed and focused through training. Nature gives you the potential, but nurture determines how well that instinct and natural potential are harnessed.

BK: What makes a good working sheepdog? Does the environment determine how well they can do their jobs?

JR: I like a classic Border Collie-type sheepdog. I think they look right, but that is just vanity. All that really matters is how well the dog works. A pup comes to its new owners to start its new life at eight weeks old. Choosing a puppy is about knowing the working quality of the parents. Floss and Tan came from a noted sheepdog breeder whose dogs are remarkably good workers. Different types of landscapes require different types of sheepdogs; fell land requires dogs with stamina and an ability to hunt sheep out of bracken.

BK: Do sheepdogs have different skill sets?

JR: Yes. Some sheepdogs have strong “eye” (power over the sheep with their gaze and presence), and those kinds of dogs like working in small fields close up to the sheep. Others work best in the mountains and across big spaces; they can hunt sheep out of crags and rocky screes. This kind of dog is best for the fells.

All dogs have different character traits; some are confident, others timid. Part of training is learning to connect with the dog and to communicate with it and get the best from it. Floss is a very strong, confident dog who likes to work up close; she tries to dominate me and the other dogs. Tan is quiet and shy, and I have to encourage him and praise him. I change my tone of voice depending on which one I am working, or I can unsettle Tan.

BK: In your first book, The Shepherd’s Life, you said that it’s possible to “make a mess” of training a sheepdog. How does that happen?

JR: The thread between shepherd and sheepdog can easily break. The dog is often trying desperately to please the person she works for, so if you speak in the wrong tone, or get frustrated or cross, you can shake the dog’s confidence, or scare or sicken her and spoil her love of the work. But perhaps the commonest mistake is that the dog just doesn’t understand what the shepherd wants, and becomes disheartened.

A few years ago, I felt I didn’t understand training as well as I should, so I sought expert advice from a trainer called Andy Nickless, who makes DVDs about training sheepdogs. I use his training method and find it works very well.

BK: In the same book, you wrote, “Shepherds hate other people’s dogs near their sheep.” What kind of harm can off-leash pet dogs do?

JR: To sheep, dogs are just wolves. But the sheepdog who is well known to the flock becomes less stressful and scary, and they know it is under the shepherd’s control. A stray, unknown dog —which is often out of control— causes them stress. It may chase them until they collapse from exhaustion, or miscarry; it may attack and kill them. Even tiny dogs can do this. And even the nicest, friendliest family pet can be excited by fleeing sheep and become momentarily wild as the adrenaline kicks in.

So that’s why I hate other people’s dogs near my sheep: they are all potential disasters. Dogs should be kept on leads near farm animals, for everyone’s sake. Responsible dog owners can help by persuading others to do the right thing. And for that, we are grateful.

Culture: Reviews
A Stray: Film Review
A new film looks at a young man and a dog both in need of a place to call home.

In A Stray, Adan, a young, homeless Somali immigrant played by Barkhad Abdiarhman (Captain Phillips) is paired with a homeless dog. This compelling film, written and directed by Musa Syeed, is only his second narrative feature. Syeed, clearly influenced by the neo-realism of the great Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray, chose to center his story in a community of Muslim Somalians living in Minnesota’s Twin Cities.

In this society, Adan is on his own, unfocused and confused. Similar to many refugees, he tries to assimilate, although he’s not sure what that really means, as well as to stay in touch with his own culture and religion. Then, while on a job delivering food, he hits a stray dog, played with charming realism by Ayla, a Terrier mix.

The dog is uninjured, but then Adan, with no resources of his own, is burdened not only by a creature who needs to be cared for but also, one his religion considers unclean. Adan feels helpless in this situation, ill-equipped to know what’s best for himself or for the dog. Slowly, we see Adan growing into a kinder, more focused person, a change inspired, perhaps, by the incipient bond he forges with the dog and his efforts to do the right thing by her.

This film provides the viewer with insight into a social milieu with which most of us are entirely unfamiliar, that of refugees and their struggle to survive in American communities. Also, in a revelatory scene, into the Native American community; each group finds it difficult to understand the other’s “outsider” status. The film’s ending is influenced by a lesson an imam shares with Adan: A man was wandering in the desert and finally found water, but near the well, there was a thirsty dog. The man filled his shoe to give water to the dog before drinking some himself, and God granted the man heaven.

We spoke with the film’s writer/ director, Musa Syeed, and Ayla’s handler/ owner, Karen Radford, to find out more about what informs their work.

Bark: What inspired this film?

Musa Syeed: My wife found a stray dog shortly after we got married. We are both Muslim, and we were raised to believe that dogs are dirty—you can’t touch them and that kind of thing. Over the weeks we had the dog, I unexpectedly developed a relationship with her. She was a black Lab/ German Shepherd mix, and was such a happy puppy after my wife nursed her back to health. But we were moving to another state, so we decided to take her to the shelter. I had a connection with her, even though I had to give her up. I had this regret, and I started to look at this attitude toward dogs. It isn’t just a religious thing; there are lots of layers to it, and I wanted to make a film about that.

Bark: How did you come to incorporate the dog into the film, and as such an important character?

Musa: I wanted to write a story about a Muslim kid and a dog, like those typical classic American stories. We all grew up reading White Fang and those kinds of books, and I wanted to tell that story from a new perspective, reflecting the new America, in a way. I had that idea in the back of my mind. I also wanted to tell a story about the Minneapolis Somali community and the thematic connection between this community of refugees that’s trying to make a home for itself and a dog who also needs a home. For me, the interesting thing is how unlikely pairings such as these happen and how they find a way to connect, and to love each other in a way, despite the barriers between them. In this case, the question was, how can you love something you can’t touch? That was something I thought was an interesting challenge to show, and it is something that reflects this moment in America. There is a lot of division, and how we bridge it is what’s important to me.

Bark: How did you connect with Karen and her dog Ayla?

Musa: A local [Minneapolis] animal trainer, Debi Pool of Animal Talent Pool, has a catalog of 60 or 70 dogs, and she showed us pictures and some videos. I thought that when we did close-ups, people needed to see the dog’s eyes for that personal connection. Ayla has nice eyes, and her look was really great, her scruffy look; plus, she was the right size to fit into the bag!

Bark: Tell us more about Ayla.

Karen Radford: We adopted Ayla through Secondhand Hounds [Eden Prairie] about five years ago. She was found wandering in a ditch. We don’t know her exact mix, but we speculate Jack Russell and West Highland Terrier. True to her Terrier type, she’s excellent at hunting up vermin, and she still loves wandering in ditches. One of my hobbies is to train dogs for sports like agility and flyball. So although this is Ayla’s acting debut, she was very amenable to training.

Bark: Musa, could you tell us about directors or movies that have influenced your filmmaking?

Musa: There are neo-realism films that focus on a dog, especially Vittorio De Sica’s Umberto D., about an older man and a dog, although in that story, he wanted to get rid of the dog so he could commit suicide. And then there was a 2008 American film, Wendy & Lucy, about a woman who has to give up a dog in order to save herself.

I was inspired by those films, but I think that oftentimes, it’s easy to be sentimental with dogs and to use them to manipulate audiences, to tug at their hearts. I deliberately didn’t push that too hard. In some films, the dog dies or goes through some brutality, and I also didn’t want this film to be about that. I know people will see that this film is about a refugee and a dog and think that something really devastating will happen, but it doesn’t go there. I wanted to tell a story that was more lighthearted and healing for the people watching it.

Bark: Even though we know little of the main characters’ backstories, they feel multidimensional. Was much of the filming off script, or improvised?

Musa: There was some of that. When I wrote the screenplay, there were certain things I thought were simple, things a dog would just do, like barking; I didn’t realize that it’s a skill that has to be trained. So a lot was understanding what we had to prepare Ayla for and, importantly, what she was up for doing. There was a scene where she was supposed to jump and run around and she didn’t feel like it at that moment, so we had to find a way to work around her. She can’t take direction from me. It was more about respecting where she was, and trying to shape scenes to where she wanted to be.

Bark: Karen, how did you go about training Ayla for more scripted scenes —for example, when she needed to jump into the bag?

Karen: We didn’t have much time between when we were selected and when we shot the film, so we worked on the basics. For the bag-jumping, she had breakfast in her bag every morning. I have another dog, and they would have a competition to see who got to be in the bag. We made that bag really rewarding. We practiced throwing a shirt over her, having different people pick her up, having her ride with someone in a wheelchair. The challenge was that we didn’t know what would happen from day to day, or where the scenes would be filmed, so we didn’t have a chance to visit beforehand. As Musa said, we just had to work with the challenge that dogs don’t generalize. Even if I had her do a behavior at home, that didn’t mean she would do it the same way in an apartment or in a park.

Bark: There’s a scene where Adan bathes Ayla in a bucket. Did you have to train specifically for that?

Karen: One of the challenges of that scene was that she wasn’t allowed to shake [the water coming off her is considered “unclean”]. I can’t take credit for actually teaching Ayla not to shake when wet. However, I taught her a rock solid “watch me,” which we used when she had to stand unattended in the bucket, and I taught Barkhad how to handle her when he was bathing her so she wouldn’t shake all over him. After the scene was done and Barkhad was out of range, Ayla was allowed to shake to her heart’s content.

Musa: Karen brought that bucket to the set. I have to commend her for being more than just the owner/ trainer. She helped with props and other things. It made the movie better —having someone on-set like that to collaborate was really great.

Bark: Tell us about the cultural divide over the concept of pet-keeping.

Musa: There are differences in opinion within Islamic law about the impurity of the dog, and that can often be exaggerated. It comes less from the religion itself than from cultural practices and not being exposed to dogs. Also, when immigrant families have to feed themselves, pet-keeping seems like a luxury. Besides religion, there’s a racial/cultural component. And then at the end, people have to realize that keeping the dog is harder for him than it is for other people, not just because of religion but also because of social and economic factors. So I hope that people see that there are layers to that choice, and appreciate it.

Dog's Life: Humane
How To Be A Shelter Santa

As the year winds down and holiday celebrations speed up, dogophiles often look for ways to do something extra for animal shelters. Bark reader Karina Holosko, writer and “boots-on-the-ground activist for shelter dogs,” recently wrote to us with an inspired approach that can be put into practice immediately or rolled out at any point in the year. Her tips follow, plus one of our own.

FIND A SHELTER
Choose a state and google “animal control”; follow up by visiting the websites of city-run facilities, many of which are overloaded and understaffed. You can identify those with the greatest need by the length of their “How You Can Help” section. Settle on one whose work you’d like to support.

GET IN TOUCH
Contact the shelter supervisor and make a friend. Ask about the shelter’s weekly intake numbers. Be diplomatic and thoughtful—you’re entering someone else’s territory (no one wants an uninvited outsider telling them what to do). Be clear that you understand the very difficult situations the shelter faces every day, and that you and your community would like to help.

MAKE A LIST
Work with the shelter to create an Amazon wish list, which makes it easy for all donations to go directly to the shelter.

CREATE A CARD
Create a business card (you can get 500 for $20 or so) with the shelter’s name and website, and the link to the Amazon wish list. Then, go out into your neighborhood and spread the word (and the card). Holosko describes stopping strangers walking their dogs in her Upper East Side NYC neighborhood, handing them a card and describing the needs of dogs in her chosen shelter.

THROW IN THE TOWEL(S)
Your local shelter may also welcome this help, and they will definitely welcome donations of towels. They can never have enough of these versatile articles. Among the ways they’re used: to cozy up a cage; as a “towel cowl” to safely and gently handle small, nervous dogs; to move a dog from a surgical table, to block drafts, for kennel privacy and—of course—as after-bath aids, keeping wet dogs warm as they dry off.*

MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Holosko tells us that last year, she selected a shelter in Rutherford, Tenn. Though it’s in a small county (pop. 200,000), the shelter was receiving 60 animals a day and needed everything from food bowls, blankets and leashes to bleach to clean the cages. Her outreach was successful, and, as she says, “It was a morale-booster to the staff; they took the opportunity to start a newsletter, organize the first Easter egg hunt and begin actively educating the community on the benefits of spay and neuter!”

*From the ASPCApro blog and Greenville County Animal Care, Greenville, S.C.

Dog's Life: Humane
How To Be A Shelter Santa

As the year winds down and holiday celebrations speed up, dogophiles often look for ways to do something extra for animal shelters. Bark reader Karina Holosko, writer and “boots-on-the-ground activist for shelter dogs,” recently wrote to us with an inspired approach that can be put into practice immediately or rolled out at any point in the year. Her tips follow, plus one of our own.

FIND A SHELTER
Choose a state and google “animal control”; follow up by visiting the websites of city-run facilities, many of which are overloaded and understaffed. You can identify those with the greatest need by the length of their “How You Can Help” section. Settle on one whose work you’d like to support.

GET IN TOUCH
Contact the shelter supervisor and make a friend. Ask about the shelter’s weekly intake numbers. Be diplomatic and thoughtful—you’re entering someone else’s territory (no one wants an uninvited outsider telling them what to do). Be clear that you understand the very difficult situations the shelter faces every day, and that you and your community would like to help.

MAKE A LIST
Work with the shelter to create an Amazon wish list, which makes it easy for all donations to go directly to the shelter.

CREATE A CARD
Create a business card (you can get 500 for $20 or so) with the shelter’s name and website, and the link to the Amazon wish list. Then, go out into your neighborhood and spread the word (and the card). Holosko describes stopping strangers walking their dogs in her Upper East Side NYC neighborhood, handing them a card and describing the needs of dogs in her chosen shelter.

THROW IN THE TOWEL(S)
Your local shelter may also welcome this help, and they will definitely welcome donations of towels. They can never have enough of these versatile articles. Among the ways they’re used: to cozy up a cage; as a “towel cowl” to safely and gently handle small, nervous dogs; to move a dog from a surgical table, to block drafts, for kennel privacy and—of course—as after-bath aids, keeping wet dogs warm as they dry off.*

MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Holosko tells us that last year, she selected a shelter in Rutherford, Tenn. Though it’s in a small county (pop. 200,000), the shelter was receiving 60 animals a day and needed everything from food bowls, blankets and leashes to bleach to clean the cages. Her outreach was successful, and, as she says, “It was a morale-booster to the staff; they took the opportunity to start a newsletter, organize the first Easter egg hunt and begin actively educating the community on the benefits of spay and neuter!”

*From the ASPCApro blog and Greenville County Animal Care, Greenville, S.C.

Magazine: 2015-2017
Issue 88: Winter 2016
Wish Lists

Lists … where would we be without ’em, especially at this time of the year? When you’re making yours, be sure that your dog is at the top. Dogs’ needs are rather simple. Make time for their walkies, even if the weather is beastly; give them mental stimulation (learning a few well-timed tricks will keep them sharp); and pencil in some extra-long petting sessions.

In this issue on the training front, Tracy Krulik considers the concept of “eager to please,” and how (or really, if) it plays out in the training process. Louise Thayer ponders the role of tension in relationships while training bird dogs for field work. Karen London dives deep in her excellent piece about “protecting the cue.” (I was relieved to learn that there are ways to refresh the cue/command once we muddy it; now, instead of come, I use another “ici” to summon my Pointer.) Kama Brown investigates the widely held suspicion that European dogs behave better than their American counterparts.

On wellness: Advice from vets and a canine physical therapist. Dr. Sarah Wooten tells us why we should be concerned about persistent coughing, and Dr. Sara Greenslit covers the use of cold lasers in treating those pesky granulomas (sores) caused by too much licking. Canine physical therapist Karen Atlas gives us an overview of what PT pros have to offer, and how to get the most from those sessions. And Donna Raditic, DVM—a vet nutritionist—tells us why she believes in the OMG protocol for supplementation. See what that is and how it can help your dog.

We interview British shepherd/author/pastoral conservationist James Rebanks about his charming new book, The Shepherd’s View. We cover the indie film scene in a Q&A with Musa Sayeed, director/writer of A Stray, a new, must-see-movie about a young Somalian immigrant in Minneapolis who helps a stray dog and begins to build a bridge to a new life in this country. This gem of a film also marks the acting debut of one of its stars, Ayla, who we are proud to have as our very special cover dog. And we report on the Syrian refugee crisis from a canine perspective in a report about a young musician who had to leave his beloved dog behind, and then mounted an international effort to reunite with her.

The culture list is anchored by a story on the works of Giuseppe Castiglione, a Jesuit who was a painter in the Chinese imperial court during the first half of 18th century. It’s said that he got the gig by showing the emperor one of his dog paintings!

Our essay list includes Laura Coffey extolling the charms of senior dogs. Tawni O’Dell unpacks the difficult decision to rehome a dog. In an especially moving piece, “Saying Goodbye to Shelby,” Thom Jones considers how he had much in common with his Boxer. Jones died in October and we decided to republish his remarkable essay—which appeared in our collection, Dog Is My Co-Pilot—as a tribute to his immense talent and his love for dogs.

We have cold weather travel picks, a guide to TV vet viewing, a DIY project that would make a perfect holiday gift, GoPro tips, and a suggestion from a reader about how to become a shelter angel.

For now, please know that we’re grateful that you’re part of dog culture and reading our magazine. We wish you and your loved ones, furred or otherwise, a joyful and fulfilling holiday and new year. See you in ’17.

FEATURES

Canine Rehab: Physical therapy can help dogs get back on their paws. By Karen Atlas, PT, MPT, CCRT

Truman: This dog needed a job. By Tawni O’Dell

My Old Dog: Helping senior dogs will make you happy. By Laura Coffey, Photos by Lori Fusaro

War & Peace: A canine refugee’s journey from Syria to Belgium. By Kasper Goethals

Masterworks: Castiglione’s Ten Prized Dogs. By Cameron Woo

Dogs, European Style: Why are European dogs so well-behaved? By Kama Brown, CPDT-KA

Film review of A Stray and conversation with director/writer Musa Syeed and handler/owner Karen Radford.

A Shepherd’s View: Bark talks with James Rebanks about sheepdogs and his shepherding way of life.

Saying Goodbye to Shelby: By Thom Jones

Endpiece: The Opie Path By Bob Quarteroni

 

It’s a Dog’s Life

DIY: Decoupage Bangle.

By Twig Mowatt

 

BEHAVIOR: Protect the Cue

How to keep others from sabotaging your dog’s training.

By Karen B. London, PhD

 

LESSONS: Tension & Teamwork

Understanding the role tension plays in relationships.

By Louise Thayer

 

INNOVATIONS: Knee News

A new device as a way to avoid osteotomy and joint motion.

By Jess Elliott

 

HEALTH: Throat Woes

Coughing may indicate a hidden condition.

By Sarah Wooten, DVM

 

TRAINING: Eager to Please?

When it comes to training, it’s not about respect, it’s about reward.

By Tracy Krulik

 

WELLNESS: Light Work

Treating lick granulomas with cold laser.

By Sara Greenslit, DVM

 

NUTRITION: OMG!

Three dog-friendly supplements.

By Donna M. Raditic, DVM, DACVN, CVA

 

INGREDIENTS: The Omegas

Nutritionally vital and essential fatty acids.

By Claudia Kawczynska

 

REVIEWS

Spill, Simmer, Falter, Wither; Sirius; Beware of the Dog; Modern Dog Parenting

 

DOGPATCH

Guest Editorial: India’s Animal Aid Unlimited

Rescue Me: Photography by Richard Phibbs

TV Viewing Vet Round-up

Winter Travel: Lake Superior; Cape Cod

Pumpkin, the raccoon, and her dogs.

Go-Pro Tips

Smiling Dogs: Always Irresistible

Be a Shelter Angel

Gift Guide: Something for them all.

Poetry: Pat Tompkins; Adam Scheffler; Irene Willis, Gloria Hoffernan, Nancy Gustafson

Cover Dog: Ayla

Spotlight

Editor’s Letter

Contributors

From Our Readers

News: Letters
Smiling Dog: Clops

After being at the pound for 6-months, Clops' time was up. He had given up on finding a family to the point of sleeping in his own mess. Luckily, a friend who worked in the shelter knew he'd make a wonderful companion and called around. When his new mom-to-be arrived and called out to him, he jumped as if to say Where have you been?

Clops the best ever. He never makes a mess and he has free reign over everything in his new home. He even gets to sleep in the big bed.

News: Editors
Bark Holiday Gift Guide for Pet Lovers
12 Perfect Dog Gifts

1. Clickit Sport safety harness helps diminish the risk of injury to pets in a car accident or sudden stop. It was rigorously tested to include the same crash tests used to test child safety restraints.

2. Molly Mutt’s new dog crate pads get a helping hand from elsewhere in the animal kingdom — sheep! That’s because they’re filled with 100% natural and sustainably-sourced wool from California. Warm in the winter and cool in the summer, wool is the ideal match for crate pads. starting at $79.

3. The Snood from Gold Paw Series is a festive, super-toasty, lusciously-soft, neck and ear warmer for dogs of every shape and size. Made in the USA with recycled materials in four colors, sizes S-XL.

4. For fetch-loving dogs who just won’t tire, the interactive iFetch Automatic Ball Launcher lets your dog fetch to their heart’s content. Choose from the original iFetch for small to medium sized dogs or the iFetch Too for larger breeds. Get ready for non-stop fun!

5. Pawsitively Safe is the perfect stocking stuffer. Each tag provides vital information so pet finders can contact you immediately by email, text or phone, getting your pet home safe and found. $12.99, free shipping!

6. The Ruffwear Front Range™ Harness is an easy-to-fi t, everyday dog harness that’s comfortable to wear all-day and built to last a lifetime of adventures. Perfect for casual treks, training or when additional support is needed.

7. Wrapsit™ slipcover crate slides onto a folding quad chair to instantly create a mesh-sided safe haven for Fido anytime you open your chair. Wrapsit folds with the chair to become the carrying case, take your dog with you wherever you have fun.

8. We love pets. We share our home with them. We rescue them. We advocate for them. And Todd Belcher at Jimmydog paints a whole lot of them. The perfect gift for the pet lovers in your life. To ensure holiday delivery, contact them today at todd@jimmydog.com or 336.201.7475.

9. This holiday season you can give your pooch a way to snoodle up in style, with the William Wegman-designed ‘Throver’ blanket from Crypton. Great for home, car, picnic or anywhere you’d welcome a touch of style and comfort along with stain resistance and odor control. Offered in several snazzy, snuggly styles.

10. The Icebug Metro offers the perfect blend of comfort, warmth, and sure-footed traction on any surface, from dry asphalt to pure ice so you can walk your dog everyday, even in cold, wet, slippery winter. A Bark Editors’ Pick!

11. Lindy’s Bakery offers 10 different recipes of delicious dog treats. 100% of the proceeds go to help homeless youth at Daybreak in Dayton, OH. From $5.99 to $6.99 for a 6 oz. package.

12. This handmade pet bed is two-toned gray and a repurposed wine crate. Includes a vintage butterfly print pillow and bolster for the pampered pet.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Halloween Dog Safety Tips

With Halloween’s ghosts, goblins and treats around the corner the good folks at the ASPCA Pro have these important safety tips for us:

1. Lock candy safely away.

Kids love to stash candy in their rooms, but a dog’s keen sense of smell will lead him to even the most cleverly hidden treasure. Contact a veterinary professional right away if your pet does get into Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or is sugar-free and contains xylitol.

2.  Don’t leave glow sticks lying around.

Glow sticks are used to help keep kids safe while they are out in the dark. Pets (especially cats) find these glow sticks to be a lot of fun as well, and we commonly get calls about pets puncturing the sticks. While most of them are labeled as non-toxic, they do have an extremely bitter taste and we will often see pets who bite into them drooling and racing around the house. A little treat or sip of milk will usually stop the taste reaction.

3. Keep your pet identified and visible.

There are a lot of extra people on the streets at Halloween, and that combined with strange costumes can spook pets and cause them to bolt. If you take your pet out after dark, make sure he or she wears a reflective collar and is securely leashed. And make sure your pet has proper identification on the collar.

4. Calm your pet.

Even pets who are kept indoors may experience intense anxiety over the large number of strangely dressed visitors. Keeping your pet away from trick-or-treaters may do the trick, but if you think more will be needed be sure and speak with your vet well in advance about options to help calm your pet.

5. Check those costumes.

Costumes can be fun for the whole family. If you are planning on dressing up your best bud, ensure that the costume fits well and isn't going to slip and tangle the pet or cause a choking hazard if chewed on. Never leave a costumed pet unattended.

Pages