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JoAnna Lou

JoAnna Lou is a New York City-based researcher, writer and agility enthusiast.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Custom Cart for an Ailing Pup
California Home Depot builds a wagon for a cancer stricken dog.






















When Risa Feldman's 15-year old dog, Ike, was diagnosed with bone cancer, she wanted him to be able to enjoy their last few months together. Ike's illness made it painful to move, even with his special wheelchair or harness that Risa uses to help him walk. So she decided to build Ike a cart that would allow him to continue their favorite outings along California's Manhattan Beach.

Risa went to Home Depot asking for help in modifying an existing wagon and got much more than just advice. When employee Ernesto Moran heard Risa's dilemma, he teamed up with co-worker Justin Wadman to create a solution. Not only did they build a custom cart, complete with a small ramp, they also committed to building a ramp for Risa's car to help Ike get in.

Ernesto said that Home Depot allows them to give back to the customers, so he and Justin chose this project to help out Risa and Ike. Their manager didn't hesitate to approve the venture. Risa was incredibly touched by their generosity and now Ike can continue to people watch and bask in the sun from his new cart.  

Check out Ernesto demo the creative ramp feature in this video.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Dog Training on the Streets
N.H. police "click and treat" law abiding citizens.





















In dog training, we often say, "what you click is what you get," meaning the behavior you reward will be repeated again. This is true in humans and canines, yet people typically rely on punishment to control behavior in every day life. It may be unrealistic to eliminate giving tickets to speeders or time outs to rowdy kids, but what if we could use successful principles from reinforcement based dog training to increase desirable behaviors in people? One town in New Hampshire is doing an experiment to explore just that.

This winter, the Farmington, N.H. police department, began an experiment to increase desirable habits, like people walking their dogs on leash and using crosswalks. The officers began randomly handing out gift cards for free pizza and fries to people abiding by the rules.  

Police Chief Jay Drury came up with the idea after watching a man make his way to a crosswalk despite this winter's heavy snow. He wanted to reward the man for his perseverance, but didn't quite know how. That's when he teamed up with local convenience store Crowley's Variety & Grill and began the gift card program.

So far the initiative has been well received and they even gained a second sponsor, Holy Rosary Credit Union. By recognizing good behavior, the officers are building a new level of trust with the community, while getting citizens to think twice before breaking the law.

We can get so stuck focusing on bad behavior that it can be good to push ourselves to notice the good!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Simpsons Creative Force Donates Royalties to Charity
Sam Simon has created a lasting legacy of helping animals and people

Editor’s note: Sam Simon died at his home in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on Sunday, March 8, 2015. He will be remembered for his creative spirit, generosity and love of animals.

Nine-time Emmy winner Sam Simon is famous for his work on the Simpsons television show, but to the countless people and animals he's helped through his charity work, Sam is best known for his dedication to helping others. While many celebrities make donations to their favorite causes, you can tell that Sam's philanthropy has become an important part of his life.

Tragically, Sam was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer earlier this year. He since announced plans to donate nearly all of his Simpsons royalties to charity, thought to be in the tens of millions of dollars annually. Sam says that everyone in his family is taken care of and he loves to be able to use his money to make a difference.

While Sam's decision got a lot of media buzz, this final gift is only part of the legacy that he will leave behind. Over the last decade, Sam has been tireless in his dedication to helping people and animals.  

In 2002, he created the Sam Simon Foundation which runs pet visitation programs at nursing homes, trains shelter pups to be service dogs, and funds a mobile veterinary truck that offers free non-orthopedic surgeries. The organization even runs a vegan food bank for human families in need.  

Sam has also been a longtime supporter of PETA, Save the Children, and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. His support of the latter recently funded four ships now being used to hinder whaling and illegal fishing.  

Sam first got involved with animal rights initiatives after trying to change a greyhound racing episode of The Drew Carey Show. Since he couldn't get the writer to edit the script, Sam decided to donate the money he earned from the episode to PETA in order to make a statement about dog racing. Sam teamed up with PETA again after his diagnosis to buy out zoos and circuses. His dream was to see these animals walk on grass for the first time.

Sam will be missed for both his talent and compassion for others, but he will live on through the philanthropic initiatives he's put in place. We certainly need more celebrities like Sam in the world!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Amtrak to Welcome Dogs and Cats
Recent legislation mandates Amtrak to become pet friendly.
Rep. Jeff Denham with Lily, the inspiration for the pet friendly legislation.
The White House and Republican-controlled House of Representatives don't agree on much these days, however, in a rare bipartisan vote, a bill was passed this week that will continue funding to Amtrak and make the train line pet friendly. While the White House didn't fully agree with the legislation, it's believed that support on both sides was won over by the pet-related part of the bill. Amtrak will now be mandated to create a pilot program that welcomes dogs and cats system wide.

The provision was included in the bill by California Representative Jeff Denham who has been advocating for pet friendly trains since he realized several years ago that he couldn't ride Amtrak with his French Bulldog, Lily.

The bill specifically directs Amtrak to figure out parameters of the program within one year of its passing, which will need to include a designated pet car on each train. Traveling animals will ride in a kennel and be subject to a to fee (amount to be determined).

For now, pet kennels must fit within Amtrak's carry-on luggage size limits, 28" x 22" x 14". That's bad news for big dogs, but it is larger than the standard in-cabin size for pets traveling by plane.

Hopefully it won't take long for Amtrak to finalize the parameters since they've already been running pet friendly trains in a pilot program on two lines in Illinois since last spring. 145 dogs and cats have ridden the train since the initiative began.

It's always great to see more pet friendly travel options, particularly alternatives to air travel. I hope to see the kennel size increased in the future to make Amtrak accessible to more dogs.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Trigger for Bone Cancer Identified
Scientists have possibly found the protein behind osteosarcoma.
UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine intern Kathleen Tsimbas checks on Yurtie, a canine cancer patient, in the UW Veterinary Care oncology ward.

With so many dogs I know affected by cancer, I'm always excited to learn about new breakthroughs in the search for a cure. The latest research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine is an important one, as they may have identified the biological mechanism that gives some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs.

Scientists at the school were interested in why only some cells generate tumors. What they found was a connection between the increased expression of a particular gene in tumor cells and canine bone cancer.

The study looked at cell lines generated from dogs with osteosarcoma, a common bone cancer that also affects people. After removing tumors from the canine participants, the cells were grown in a lab and transplanted into mice. The researchers then looked to see which lines developed tumors and which did not, and the differences between them.

The scientists identified several hundred genes that expressed differently between the tumor-forming and nontumor-forming cell lines. One protein in particular, called frizzled-6, was present at levels eight times higher in cells that formed tumors. Proteins and RNA, like frizzled-6, are responsible for many vital cellular functions, like receiving information and activating pathways that regulate growth. When these pathways go awry, they may contribute to the development of tumors.

Though a preliminary association has been made, it's not clear what role frizzled-6 plays. It's possible that the frizzled-6 expression may be inhibiting a signaling pathway that contributes to the formation of tumor-initiating cells.

Next the researchers want to better understand the findings. Does frizzled-6 serve as a marker of a more aggressive disease? Will identifying the protein improve the accuracy of prognoses? The veterinary school plans to continue the study in order to answer these questions, in addition to expanding the research to human cancer patients. They'd like to confirm that frizzled-6 is truly what gives these cells the ability to form new tumors, or if it's possible that it's part of a combination of multiple genes that lead to tumor formation.

If they can prove that frizzled-6 is behind the tumor-forming cells, the protein may provide oncologists with another target for therapy which would improve outcomes for cancer patients, both canine and human.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Skiing with Dogs
Enjoying the snow with our pets can be fun, but dangerous.






















As an avid snowboarder, there's nothing that I would love more than to share my favorite winter hobby with my dogs. I'm captivated by ski patrol canines that help rescue people trapped in avalanches and dogs that run alongside people cruising down in the backcountry. But the sharp edges on skis and snowboards that let us carve into icy slopes also make it potentially dangerous for our four legged companions.

Avid backcountry skiers Don and Polly Triplat regularly take their dogs Scarlet and Brodie with them in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Normally they're careful to separate the dogs from the ski party as each person tears down the mountain, but accidents can happen in a split second.

Earlier this month the couple was skiing with friends, when Scarlet darted in front of a friend just as he was starting his descent. Scarlet managed to get caught in his ski causing a tumble that left the skier unharmed but left the poor pup with a deep gash in her front leg. The wound was so serious that it sliced through her skin, muscle, and artery to the bone, resulting in an injury that could result in fatal blood loss.

Fortunately the Triplats are trained in wilderness first aid and were able to calmly assess the situation and make a plan of action. Don quickly clamped Scarlet's artery to the bone and created a tourniquet with gauze and duct tape to stop the bleeding. Then Don carried Scarlet on his shoulders as he descended the mountain, while friends helped. One skied ahead to break trail, creating an easier path, and another raced ahead to reposition their car to the nearest place they could reach the road.

Since the accident, the Triplats have stopped taking their dogs on backcountry downhill trips and have opted for including them on tamer cross country skiing excursions. They were fortunate to have the training necessary for a successful outcome, but the couple wants to warn other skiers to be aware that taking a dog skiing is a big responsibility.

This story makes me think of the rescue of Missy in Colorado. It shows how important it is to be prepared for an emergency when taking your dog into the backcountry, whether it's skiing, hiking, or boating. Always bring first aid supplies (and know how to use them!) and have a plan for how to carry your dog to safety (when hiking, I always bring a backpack large enough to carry my dog if necessary).

Do you ski or snowboard with your pups?

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Pit Bull Service Dogs
Organizations specialize in helping people and reversing stigma.

Pit Bull lovers are constantly battling the breed's negative reputation. It can be heartbreaking to see someone cross the street to avoid your pup or usher their kids away at the park, but it happens every day to bully breeds. Every friendly, well socialized Pit Bull is an advocate for the breed, but it can be slow to shift mainstream perception.

Two organizations are on a mission to change that stigma by recruiting rescue Pit Bulls to help people. The Animal Farm Foundation's Assistance Dog Training Program in New York trains shelter Pit Bulls to push wheelchairs or help people regain their mobility and avoid falls. It's believed to be the only American training school that exclusively trains shelter Pit Bulls to be service dogs.

Another group in Chicago, Pits for Patriots, trains rescued Pit Bulls as comfort, therapy, and support dogs for veterans, police officers, and firefighters. The organization's co-founder, Kelly Yearwood, says that veterans and first responders identify with bully breeds because they've both seen a lot of trauma.

For former Marine, Joe Bonfiglio, his Pit Bull service dog, Zen, has been a life saver. Joe was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder after returning from Afghanistan and struggled to get his life back to normal. Now he can hang out with friends, shop at the mall, and has even started to take classes at a local college.

Not everyone agrees that Pit Bulls should be trained as service dogs, but if the right evaluation and training protocols are in place, it seems like a win-win. Pit Bulls make up the overwhelming majority of my local animal shelter, so this is a great way to give them a loving home and a purpose.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Reading Human Emotions
Study shows that dogs can discriminate between our expressions.

I don't think that we need a study to know our pups can tell when we're happy or sad, but it's still fun to see formal research explore our dogs' abilities and inner thinking. With all of the canine cognition labs cropping up at colleges around the world, there's been a lot of research showing that dogs can read human emotions. However a new study coming out of the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna claims to represent the first solid evidence that an animal other than humans can discriminate between emotional expressions in another species.

In this study, the researchers set up an experiment that they believed could only be solved by applying knowledge of human emotional expressions to unfamiliar pictures. The dogs were trained to discriminate between images of the same person making either a happy or angry face. In each case, the canine participants were only shown the upper or lower half of the face. After training on 15 picture pairs, the dogs' abilities were tested in four situations where they were shown (1) new faces (but the same half as in the training), (2) the other half of the faces used in training, (3) the other half of the new faces, and (4) the left half of the faces used in the training.

They found that the dogs were able to select the correct facial expression more often than would be expected by random chance in every case. Not only could the dogs learn to identify facial expressions, but they were able to transfer their learnings to people they'd never seen before.

Interestingly the researchers also discovered that it was harder to get the dogs to associate a reward with an angry face, suggesting that prior experience had taught them to stay away from a person that looks mad. From my own experience, dogs learn this very quickly!

Next, the scientists hope to study how dogs express emotions and how those emotions are influenced by people.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Surprise Canine Visit at the Hospital
Iowa pup treks to Mercy Medical Center in search of her mom.

Nancy Franck had been in recovery post-surgery at Mercy Medical Center when she got the surprise of her hospital stay. When Nancy left home in Cedar Rapid, Iowa, she had to leave behind her beloved Schnauzers, Sissy and Barney. About two weeks into her hospital stay, Nancy's husband, Dale, noticed that Sissy was missing. He frantically searched for the 11 year old dog everywhere, but couldn't find her. About four hours later he got a call from hospital security with Sissy.

A surveillance camera in the hospital lobby caught the determined pup entering through automatic doors and wandering around. Sissy ended up being successful in her mission to see Nancy. When Dale's daughter came to pick her up, the hospital allowed Sissy to have a surprise visit.

Although the Francks only live 20 blocks from Mercy Medical Center, but the've never walked there before with Sissy. However, Nancy and Sissy have always had a special bond, with Sissy “choosing” Nancy when they firtst met eleven years ago. The then eight week old puppy came right up to Nancy, pawed at her leg, and then fell asleep on her shoulder.

Over a decade later, I can't think of a better way to be cheered up at the hospital!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Dog Cafes
Is a canine version of the popular cat cafe on the way?
There's been a lot of talk recently about cat cafes popping up in cities like New York and San Francisco. The feline establishments have long been in a fixture in Tokyo, giving tiny apartment dwellers their pet fix. While Japan now has cafes that feature all sorts of animals from owls to goats, the concept is just starting to trickle over to America. I'm guessing we'll never see a goat cafe in the States, but a canine version may be on the way.

Two recent Indiegogo fundraising campaigns have been trying to raise money to open dog cafes that will showcase adoptable pups in New York and Los Angeles. These cafes aim to reinvent the way we connect with homeless pets. Besides coming up with the funding, the main challenge is working within health codes. To work within the rules, both ventures plan to create two adjacent, but separate businesses where you could order food in one location and take the treats to enjoy in the space with the dogs.

Living in New York City, I have a lot of friends who love dogs, but can't have one because of their apartment rules or long work hours. A dog cafe would be a great way for people to get their pet fix and meet fellow animal lovers. Meanwhile the dogs can meet potential adopters and get socialized.

The Los Angeles Indiegogo project didn't meet their financing goal in time, but the New York one is still soliciting donations through February 21. However, if the dog cafes don't pan out, there are still other ways to satisfy your pet fix, like volunteering at your local animal shelter.

Would you visit a dog cafe?

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