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Blog: Karen B. London
Unusual Eating Behavior
It’s not clear what’s going on
Gertie has an unusual eating behavior. She can spend hours polishing off a couple of cups of dry dog food. She takes a few pieces of kibble from her bowl, carries it a few feet away, drops it on the floor, and then eats it piece by piece with painstaking slowness. It reminds me of the way chickadees eat from birdfeeders, taking one item from the feeder and flying to a nearby tree to eat it before...
Blog: Karen B. London
Tolerating Petting Shows Patience
Eagerness to fetch is obvious
Sometimes when I think of what we ask of dogs, I find myself impressed with what they will tolerate. Recently, I was at our local park with my kids when a man came to play fetch with his Border Collie. This dog was clearly a devoted fetcher. Her gaze was locked and loaded on the ball even as they walked into the park, and her attention never wavered. I watched the man and his dog play fetch for...
Blog: Karen B. London
Out of Control Biting
Are some individuals incapable of self-control?
I specialize in working with dogs with aggression issues, so I think about biting behavior a lot. Mostly, I’m pondering ways to help dogs stop doing it and ways to help people who want to help their dogs stop doing it. Many thoughts center on protecting dogs from situations in which they are prone to biting, and protecting people and dogs from being bitten. Other topics include the motivation...
Blog: Karen B. London
Human Walking Program
Australian office workers rescued by dogs
We all know that many dogs are in need of rescue, but The Lost Dogs Home in Melbourne Australia took a different approach to enticing people to their facility. They started a program called the Human Walking Program, which offers relief to office workers who spend too much time indoors and sitting at their desks. They offered people the opportunity to spend time over their lunch hour outdoors...
Blog: Karen B. London
They’re Not Just Furry Four-Legged People
There’s greatness in being a dog
“The only difference between them and us is they have four legs and we have two,” the woman said. She was expanding on her previous comment that she has a new baby and was picking up photographs of her new little girl. When some other people in line for their photos politely leaned in to look, she was very offended when one man said, “Oh, you have a new dog! I thought you had a new child.” I’m...
Blog: Karen B. London
Tucker’s Response to Twins
He likes the familiarity
When my sons and I entered Tucker’s home and met him for the first time, he responded in his usual way—with general hesitation and some barking. He’s in no way aggressive, but he doesn’t warm up to strangers quickly. He looked at us, backed away, and didn’t seem too pleased to see us. Over the next couple of hours, he accepted our presence, and was much more relaxed. Still, he was definitely not...
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Aggression in Dogs
Can stories about dogs with aggression issues have happy endings?
Dog Barking
By the time people have come to me for help with a dog’s aggression problems, the situation is often pretty serious and it’s not unusual for people to be at the end of their rapidly fraying ropes. Though not every situation has a fairy-tale ending, I approach each new case with optimism, partly because that’s my basic nature, but also because it reflects my experience that once in a while, a dog...
Blog: Karen B. London
Scratched By Non-Aggressive Dog
His exuberance was excessive
“Can I meet your dog?” I said to my neighbor, as I say many times each week at the park, while running errands, on hikes and anywhere else I see a dog. This was a dog who I did not yet know, and I was eager to say hello. He came over to me with the same calmness he’d had on his walk, and looked up at me. I expected a calm, possibly even a tentative greeting. Then, his face changed, and he...
Blog: Karen B. London
Dogs Helped Humans Hunt Mammoths
New evidence from archaeological sites
Archaeological sites with hundreds of dead mammoths posed a puzzle to scientists: How could humans kill so many of these massive animals with the weapons available at the time? The answer is that one of the “weapons” used was not made of stone like the other tools of the time, but was made of flesh and blood. It was the domestic dog. According to new research by Pat Shipman at Penn State...
Blog: Karen B. London
What Kind Of Dog Were You?
This quiz sees me differently than I see myself
While wasting time on Facebook yesterday—I’m not proud, but it’s been known to happen—I came across a link to a quiz that an unusually high number of my friends had shared, which piqued my interest. The question this quiz asks is, “What kind of dog were you in a past life?” I’ve taken a lot of quizzes over the years about what type of dog would best suit me as a pet, but I have yet to look into...

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