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Good Dog: Activities & Sports
Bone Picking
For some unplugged fun, train your dog to find shed deer antlers.

Dogs shed hair, males of the deer family shed antlers. Granted, not a perfect analogy—antlers are dropped only once a year, after all—but it’s one way to remember that antlers, like dog hair, are renewable resources. Working with dogs to find these “sheds” is an increasingly popular activity. Many dogs love to chew on them (serious shed-dog enthusiasts don’t allow their dogs to do so, however, because it reduces their finding value with the dog), and hobbyists enjoy crafting with them.

Deer typically lose their antlers from late winter to early spring, which makes summer an ideal time to train your dog to find the bony castoffs. The first bit of good news is that the training is neither difficult nor expensive. The second is that many types of dogs can become skilled at shed recovery; it’s not breed-specific. Any dog who’s interested in retrieving and has a good nose—a very large category!—can do it.

“There are advantages with certain [types] of dogs, such as those with a natural retrieve, [but the dog] doesn’t have to be a Lab,” says Jeremy Moore, Wisconsin-based professional shed-dog trainer. “Plenty of dogs love to play fetch. It’s not overly complicated. You’ve got to have a plan and the right tools.” Moore advises training one element at a time and keeping it fun.

Before beginning shed training, however, it’s a good idea to work on a few foundation skills. For safety, Mike Stewart—professional dog trainer and owner of Wildrose Kennels, who has been training dogs for shed retrieval since 2005—recommends that you work with your dog to brush up on obedience. Sit and stay, of course, as well as recall; your dog needs to know how to stay with you in the wide open environments where most sheds are found. Integrate basic obedience training into your summer routine, both indoors and out and in a variety of locations.

It’s also important to home in on the retrieve. One way to do that—besides throwing a tennis ball—is to have the dog watch as you walk about 10 feet out in a straight line, place the ball on the ground, return and send the dog to fetch it. This helps develop her trailing memory, bridging the gap between retrieving a thrown ball and retrieving a ball—and later, antlers—on the ground.

Next, acclimate your dog to the smell of antlers by adding liquid antler scent, a mixture of deer blood and bone. Dot scent on a tennis ball and play familiar retrieval games. Use a green tennis ball and you’ll also have a tool for advanced training.

Stewart advises desensitizing your dog to other animals and wildlife, or you’re likely spend your shed time with the pup in pursuit of a squirrel. One way to do this is to train in public parks where there are plenty of distractions: birds, squirrels, other dogs, people.

Once your dog’s basic obedience is up to par, it’s time to train shed-specific skills. With a little patience, you can have a lot of fun. (A shout-out here to Jeremy Moore, who developed the three steps that follow.)

One: Condition the dog to the shape of the antler. Moore uses a safe, flexible dummy antler. “If [a dog] gets poked or jabbed, you’re going to have a dog who shies away from antlers.”

Play fetch games using the dummy. Start inside in a closed-door hallway, then take it to the back yard. Keep it fun and praise lavishly (baby talk is allowed). If heat is an issue, practice water retrievals by tossing the dummy into a pool or lake. The dummy floats, and your dog will connect the retrieve with a positive experience.

Two: Work the dog’s nose. Building on previous training, add antler scent to the dummy. Enjoy more games in retrieval mode, and have a party when your dog delivers.

Those green, antler-scented tennis balls come in handy at this stage. Roll one into green grass cover and tell your pup to find it. Voila! You’ve helped her connect with a familiar shape and added nose work.

“Associate the scent with the same reward [your dog] got for shape,” says Moore. Reward. Reward. Reward. Keep it exciting—don’t make it just another job. Your dog will gain confidence through consistent training.

Three: Condition your dog to the feel of real antlers. Called the “finishing antler,” this specimen should be very close to the dummy in size and shape to provide a smooth transition to the real deal. (Natural scent is found at an antler’s base, so don’t use a cut-off piece.) Enhance the specimen by adding a generous amount of antler scent.

Do familiar retrieving games, connecting the finishing antler with a positive activity. When you’re confident that your dog is comfortable with real antlers, place a few on the ground and in grass cover (just as they would be found in nature) and instruct her to find them.

From your back yard, move the game to a neighbor’s back yard or a park. Antlers cue her that it’s a retrieval party waiting to happen. However, resist the temptation to go big right away.

“Set your dog up for success. Don’t go from your back yard to a 40-acre field. Don’t overwhelm the dog with distractions,” Moore says.

As your dog’s training progress, widen the training environment. As Moore notes, “If the only place you train is your back yard, [your dog] will be very good finding shed only in the back yard.”

Finishing a shed dog combines exercising the body and engaging the mind. Mike Stewart takes the dogs he’s training out on acreage and walks in a zigzag pattern, cueing direction with his hands. Zigzagging covers more ground and provides dogs with a better chance for finds. If he sees that a dog is going flat and losing focus, he waits until she’s not looking and tosses out antlers he’s brought with him to renew her interest.

“Sooner or later, she has to find something, or she’s going to quit. Make finding shed special,” Stewart says. Pump your pup with success. 

Dog's Life: Travel
Dog-Friendly Dude Ranches
Go west, and take your dog along.

Hankering for a taste of the Old West? Want to take your canine companion along on a fun-filled and unique summer vacation? Consider a dog-friendly dude ranch. More dude ranches—or guest ranches, as most are now called—are catering to those of us who can’t imagine a vacation without our dogs. Each has different rules and expectations for dogs, so contact any ranch you’re considering visiting and speak to them about the specifics of their dog-friendly policy before setting out, and ask about extra fees. Make sure you and your dog will enjoy the setting; you want a fun, yet safe, stay.

There’s something so elemental and special about heading down a trail on horseback, your dog happily trotting alongside. If your dog is fit and well-behaved, and won’t chase the horses or wildlife, he or she is the perfect dude ranch candidate. Even the older, more retiring canine can still enjoy these ranches, staying behind while you ride, joining you later for a swim or stroll, far from the hustle and bustle of the city.

Don’t ride horses? That’s fine; most guest ranches offer a multitude of activities, from fly fishing and rock climbing to hiking or hanging out by the lake or pool. You might even learn to square dance! And don’t forget the down-home, family-style meals.

Flying U Guest Ranch  Situated in British Columbia’s gorgeous Cariboo region, the Flying U is the only guest ranch in North America that allows unsupervised riding on 40,000 acres of aspen-dotted forests and meadows. Well-mannered dogs are welcome, off leash, in the cabin and lodge area as well as on your rides. This rustic yet comfortable resort also offers canoeing, swimming and fishing. Recently purchased by Mauritz and Enka from South Africa, the dog-friendly policy will continue. (Read about the author’s 2004 visit here.)

Sundance Trail Guest Ranch At this relaxed high-country getaway, set at 8,000 feet near Red Feather Lakes, Colo., canine guests may be off-leash as long as they get along with kids, horses, goats, sheep and other dogs. While trail rides here are supervised, owner Ellen Morin says, “We’re not a nose-to-tail outfit. Groups are small—no more than five riders per wrangler,” so each group rides at its own best pace. Is your dog a little pokey? Borrow a crate and let him snooze safely in your room while you’re riding.

The Resort at Paws Up  If you and your canine companion are looking for a few days of pampering, this is the place. Located in the Clearwater Valley outside of Missoula, Mont., this resort offers wilderness rides, fly fishing, rafting and mountain biking. Try glamping—glamorous camping—featuring five-star amenities in a huge canvas tent! Dogs inspired the resort’s name, so of course they’re welcome, indulged with the “last best doggie bed” and their own stylish Paws Up collar and leash.

At the end of your dude ranch stay, all of your cheeks will be sore—those on your butt from bouncing in the saddle, and those on your face from grinning ear to ear as you watch your dog have the time of her life.

News: Editors
Dog-Dancing Taken to New Heights
Sandra Roth and Lizzy with a showstopping performance

Dog-dancing is taken to its heights and none display this better than Sandra Roth and Lizzy at The Open European Championships in Heelwork to Music and Freestyle 2014, held in Stuttgart, Germany. “There are no compulsory movements or elements, so each team can present their individual strengths and skills,” reads Dogdance International’s preamble. “No other dog sport offers that much flexibility to ... adapt each performance to the capabilities and needs of each team member (dog as well as human).”

Sandra Roth is a ballet and jazz dancer with a passion for dogs, so moving into dog-dancing was a natural for her and turned out to be the perfect sport. As for Lizzy, her dancing companion, Roth writes in her profile that “Lizzy has been learning tricks and freestyle moves since she was a puppy. But we’ve had many problems and she was not an easy dog. So our main focus for the first 3 years was on her social behaviour and not on dog sports.”

Roth continues that Lizzy “gets more and more confident and our relationship has improved a lot. She is also starting to enjoy the attention by the audience.”

And Roth adds that, “Other than dancing we also do some obedience training, we do Treibball, scent work, lunging, dog scootering and whatever is fun for both of us.”

Don’t you agree that their performance takes your breath away? And by the time Lizzy is doing her front-leg-crossover, I couldn’t stop the tears, this was oh so lovely.

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Running Off Leash
Does your dog have the opportunity to do this?

It makes me happy to see a dog running through the woods, in a field or on the beach. Few thing make dogs happier than the chance to run free, to make choices, and to move at their own pace. Many dogs would likely choose this as their treat of choice if only they knew that it existed and was a possibility.

Safety concerns as well as leash laws severely limit many dogs’ opportunities to run off leash. It would be wonderful if everyone had acres and acres of fenced land for their dogs to enjoy, but in most communities, there is a shortage of places that dogs are legally allowed to be off leash. Dog parks are a mixed bag, and while they allow off leash opportunities, they are certainly not right for every dog. It’s a big challenge for most guardians to find a way to let their dogs run unencumbered and unrestrained. It’s a shame, too, because it’s so good for dogs to be able to run without being physically attached to a person.

I’m not opposed to leashes, by the way. In fact, I’m a huge fan of them. They protect dogs from cars, from running away and becoming lost and from misbehaving in ways that get them into real trouble. As much as I believe that dogs can benefit from running off leash, it often makes me nervous to see dogs enjoying their freedom near roads or at parks full of children.

Dogs should only have as much freedom as they can handle, and that varies from dog to dog. A dog that won’t run away, always comes when called, is polite and social with people and other dogs, and would never chase cars or bikes can obviously safely be off leash in a lot more situations than dogs who don’t share these qualities. Some dogs can be off leash anywhere that it’s allowed without a problem. Other dogs are more limited, but an off leash romp in the right situation is still a ticket to happiness.

How often does your dog have the chance to run off leash, and where can you go to do this safely?

Good Dog: Activities & Sports
This is Skijoring
Don’t have to be pro athletes to enjoy it.

I adjust my headlamp. My frozen breath catches the light.

Two excited dogs are barking, shaking my truck. I lay my skis on the trail, pointing the tips toward the woods. I unload the dogs.

I snap the gangline on River and Belle’s harnesses, click my skis into their bindings and secure my poles. My dogs are quiet now; for a brief moment, they stand still at the end of their lines. Their legs are shaking with excitement, waiting for the command.

“Hike!”

We’re off. River and Belle slam into their harnesses. The bungee line absorbs some of the jolt. I lean forward and kick off, skate skiing down the trail, propelled by two dogs into the night. Together, the dogs and I reach speeds of more than 30 km/h (about 19 mph).

This is skijoring.

This is what we live for!

Why I Skijor

I live in Canada, where there’s snow six months of the year. I have a pack of rescue dogs who, like me, are high energy. Skijoring is a great way to keep all of us exercised and happy. If we didn’t get out, we would go crazy from cabin fever.

I am an avid skier; my parents taught me to ski as soon as I was able to walk. Even with a few decades of skiing under my belt, however, skijoring offers me a challenge. My dogs push me to ski at a higher level than I would otherwise attempt. Well-trained skijoring dogs don’t want to take a break and aren’t tempted to sit and chat. They want to go!

That’s why I skijor. Try it out yourself and discover your own reasons. Following are some tips to help you on your way.

Get Ready

If you’re considering skijoring, take a realistic look at its two main components: you and your dog. You can, by the way, skijor with any breed of dog. It’s as common to see a house dog as a Husky bounding through the snow with a skier in tow.

Dogs should be at least 30 pounds and a year old, and in good health. Some smaller dogs certainly have the will, but small dogs come with small frames, and skijoring can put undue pressure on their bodies.

Before starting this sport, check in with your vet to be sure your dog’s up for it. Fitness matters for you, too. Take your own physical condition into account. Skijoring can be demanding on the knees and lower back.

If you’re new to skiing, look for a Nordic center and take a few crosscountry lessons. Two basic techniques are used when skiing behind a dog. Which one you use depends on the type of skijoring you intend to do.

Backcountry adventurers will run into deeper snow and the dog (or dogs) will help break the trail. This type of skijoring requires cross-country skis that are wide and have turned-up tips.

Is it speed you’re after? If so, you’ll be skiing on flat, wide, groomed trails using a technique called skate skiing, in which the tips of the skis are kept apart and the tails are kept together, getting the kick by alternately pushing off the skis’ inside edges, much like ice skating. Look for stiff, short skis with almost no turn-up at the front.

Don’t forget the ski wax! Using glide wax on your skis makes it easier to move over the snow. Remember to choose a wax that suits the conditions in which you’ll be skiing.

Another important skill: stopping. Here again, there are two main methods. First, the snowplow, in which you point the tips of your skis toward each other and dig down with your heels. The other quick way to stop is to fall down! Put your skis on and practice falling and getting up again before you attempt skijoring.

Stay Safe

Skijoring, like any sport, has its dangers; people and dogs can get hurt. But a few simple safety tips and common sense go a long way toward keeping accidents to a minimum.

Warm up. Use a brisk walk with some quick turns to warm up and cool down.

Know your ability. Stick to trails that are the appropriate length and difficulty for both your and your dog’s skill levels.

Protect your melon. Simple: get a winter sports helmet that fits and wear it.

Brush up on obedience training. Sit, stay, come—your dog should have the basics of obedience down before you go out on the trails. A dog you can communicate with easily means a safer and more fun outing.

Practice. Before you get on your skis, put your dog in the skijoring harness and go for a walk. Your dog needs to know the basics of how to behave in harness before you head out on the trail.

Gear Up

Who doesn’t love shopping for their dogs? Fortunately, when it comes to skijoring, the initial cost is pretty modest. A skijoring harness and a line for your dog and a waist belt for yourself will set you back around $100, although you can, of course, pay more. (Tempting though it may be, don’t try to repurpose your dog’s walking harness, or even a weight-pull harness. They’re not constructed to accommodate the pressures skijoring places on a dog’s body.)

Skijoring harnesses come in all sorts of designs and styles; the most common are X back and H back. No matter what style you choose, it should fit your dog well. A properly fitted harness allows dogs to pull from the shoulders and fits snugly enough not to move up and restrict their airway. (I liken it to putting on a backpack; the harnesses should sit on the shoulder blades.) A proper fit is critical to your dog’s comfort and safety.

Ideally, take your dog with you when you go harness shopping. If that’s not practical, or if you’re ordering online, measure carefully. Each outfitter will have its own sizing and measurement instructions, so be sure to follow them carefully. When shopping for gear online, measure twice, order once!

You and your dog are tethered to one another with a gangline (also called a tugline), which is between 8 and 12 feet long and has a section of bungee in it. The bungee makes the experience more comfortable for both of you by absorbing some of the shock when your dog takes off suddenly at the beginning, or when you fall (which may happen quite often!).

The waist or skijoring belt is worn low; at the front is a quick release attachment for the gangline. A wider belt is preferred because it spreads the pressure over more of your body and eliminates some of the stress on your lower back. A properly designed belt will allow you to use your hips to offset the dog’s pulling force.

Mind Your Manners
To ensure that everyone is safe (and that skijorers continue to be welcome on trails) a few rules need to be observed.

Choose an appropriate trail. Skijoring is a great sport for any nonmotorized, multi-use trail. Do not take your dogs on trails groomed for classic cross-country skiing, as they will likely ruin the double track set in the snow, making it unusable for others.

Keep your distance. Whether it’s another skijoring team, dog walkers or other skiers, no one likes to be tailgated. Be especially careful to give other dogs space; not all dogs are comfortable being chased.

Communicate your passes. If you are overtaking another trail user, the polite thing to do is yell “Trail” and wait until they signal that they’ve heard you by moving to the side.

Pick up after your dog. So basic, so important. Cleaning up after your dog goes a long way to ensure that trails remain open to all dog-related activities.

Skijoring strengthens your bond with your dog. You are literally attached, flying down a trail, releas-ing endorphins and sharing new adventures. It’s also the ultimate in positive reinforcement. Skijoring dogs get to pull, and are rewarded for it—the harder they pull, the faster they go. Skijoring taps into their natural instinct to move.

I’m often asked if training dogs to skijor makes it more difficult to walk them. My experience has been that allowing my dogs to pull in harness actually makes them easier to manage on daily walks. Running off their energy on the trail means they’re calmer, happier and more ready to listen.

 

News: Editors
NBA Player Klay Thompson Stars at the Dog Park
Klay Thompson and Rocco play fetch at Berkeley's Cesar Chavez Park

Ever wonder how a professional athlete handles the pressure of competition and a grueling 6-month long schedule? For burgeoning NBA star Klay Thompson of the Golden State Warriors, it’s a walk in the park … the dog park. When Klay isn’t in the gym or on the road, he likes to take his dog Rocco, an English bulldog, to his local off-leash area at Cesar Chavez Park in nearby Berkeley (CA). We’ve seen him there, playing fetch and doing what dog people do … unwinding, taking in some fresh air. “With me, my friends or my family, I can’t help but talk about basketball, so this is my escape,” Thompson is quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle profile.

ESPN analyst and hall-of-fame player Charles Barkley calls the 6 ft 9 Thompson the best NBA player at his position—strong praise. Thompson’s team, the Golden State Warriors, apparently agrees, recently resigning their star shooting guard to a multi-year, $70 million contract. What was Thompson’s response at the post-signing press conference? “We were trying to get the contract signed, and all he wanted to do was go home to his dog,” mused Warrior general manager Bob Myers.

We know the joys firsthand of Cesar Chavez Park OLA, it’s where the idea for The Bark was born. In fact, the 17-acre OLA overlooking the San Francisco Bay was founded by Bark co-founder Claudia Kawczynska in 2000. One of the founding dogs was Claudia’s dog Nellie … named after former Warrior coach Don Nelson. A bit of history we think Klay Thompson would appreciate.

Dog's Life: Travel
See California with Your Dog
Golden State Getaways
 bigbearlake_flybird

When thinking about summer getaways with your dog in California, think cool. Think water. Think spectacularly scenic and away from bright lights and big cities. Here are a few special places that will surely put a smile on your dog’s snout.

North Coast. The redwoods are fat and the North Coast beaches are often leash-free and cooled by a blanket of fog. Take an unleashed hike on the wild side at the magnificent coastal 62,000-acre King Range National Conservation Area in Shelter Cove, and stay at the Halcyon Inn Bed & Breakfast in Eureka. And don’t miss the Avenue of the Giants, a 31-mile route through some of the biggest redwoods in the world (including Luna, made famous by Julia Butterfly Hill’s extended stay).

South Lake Tahoe. Your dog can swim in the sparkling blue waters of Lake Tahoe and fish with you on a charter boat. Spend the night at the cozy cottages of Holly’s Place, with its leash-free 2.5 enclosed acres, and dine outdoors at the very hip and dog-friendly FiRE + iCE, right under the Heavenly gondola.

Mono County. A visit to the strange and ancient Mono Lake is about the closest you’ll come to exploring another planet. It’s an otherworldly must-see, but far too salty for dog paddling. Save the swimming for the nearby beautiful Eastern Sierra lakes, Lake Mary or June Lake, for example. Like ghost towns? Sleep at the lovely, super-dog-friendly Edelweiss Lodge, in Mammoth Lakes.

Cambria. A seaside haven, Cambria opens its sandy arms to the canine set. Cambria is home to a very popular dog park, but if you like more space, head to the 440-acre Fiscalini Ranch Preserve, where dogs can trot around off leash along one mile of heavenly oceanfront.

Big Bear Lake. The lakeside mountain resort community Big Bear Lake in southern San Bernardino County boasts crisp, clean alpine air year round—a real boon in these parts. You and your dog can hike, swim, rent a boat and ride right behind horse heinies on a Bear Valley Stage Lines stagecoach. Dog-friendly lodgings abound. Try Big Bear Frontier Cabins & Hotel, right on the lake, or Golden Bear Cottages, where each cute, pet-friendly cabin sports its own little fenced yard.

Good Dog: Activities & Sports
Teaching Your Dog Obedience and Rally-O
Teaching your dog to do more than just heel, sit and stay

Francoise Mira of California will never forget the day advanced obedience skills saved the life of her beloved mixed-breed dog Leilah. She had been hiking with Leilah and her Australian Shepherd, Copper, in a canyon near her home. On weekends, the area was closed off to automobile traffic, making it safe for off-leash dogs.

“All of a sudden, I heard a car coming, illegally off-roading,” says Mira. “I called Copper to me but Leilah was on the other side of the road. I told him to sit and at the same time, I gave the down-stay visual signal to Leilah and she dropped [to the ground]. Because I was able to give her that Utility down signal, a hand signal, I was able to have them both stay still and let this car go through.”

In competition, obedience at its best can look like magic. With every nod of the handler’s head or sweep of her arm, the dog responds with an enthusiastic burst of motion or a quick halt or down. Dog and handler glide together in perfect sync as the judge calls out instructions, and the small crowd gathered outside the ring quietly admires their performance. At the conclusion of the class, the judge announces which teams qualified, and to those pairs he hands out the placement ribbons, as the audience applauds and the dogs’ tails wag.

“Obedience builds confidence in the dog,” says Kate Cowles of Iowa, who competes with four shelter dogs in UKC obedience, St. Hubert’s Companion Dog Sports Program and the Association of Pet Dog Trainers’ Rally O. “For me, the point of doing competitive obedience is to build the bond.”

At its worst, competitive obedience can look like torture for both partners. Some handlers constantly jerk at their dog’s leash or practically drag the poor thing around the ring. Other handlers become so nervous about the trial setting that they pass on that stress to their dogs, who constantly lick their lips and look for a chance to bolt.

If this is your idea of obedience, then it certainly does not conjure up images of fun with your dog. But for many people nationwide, it is a favorite pastime, and their dogs enjoy the extra attention, travel and overall excitement. Perhaps if it were called something more flashy, like “precision teamwork” or “synchronized stepping,” more dog-lovers would pursue this challenging sport and discover its many benefits.

The Basics
At its most basic, obedience comprises a variety of exercises that demonstrate controlled communication between handler and dog. Depending on the level, required skills can include sit, down, stand for exam, recall, heel, retrieve, jump and scent. The degree of difficulty increases as you progress from one class to the next, known as Novice, Open and Utility in most venues.

Modern obedience in North America derives from exercises created by the world’s first Working Trial society, the Associated Sheep, Police and Army Dog Society of England. The society hosted its first Working Trial in 1924 as a practical test of each dog’s knowledge in three areas: control, agility (over varied terrain) and scent work.

Helene Whitehouse Walker is widely regarded as the founder of American obedience. In 1933, she adapted the society’s exercises to hold her own test in New York to prove the intelligence of her Standard Poodles. In 1937, Walker and her assistant, Blanche Saunders, promoted the young sport by taking their dogs on the road for a nationwide traveling obedience exhibition.

Today, the society’s three fundamental applications can still be found at an obedience trial, no matter what the venue. Control is exhibited at all levels of obedience, especially through heeling and the dog’s response to the handler’s verbal commands or, as they progress as a team, silent hand signals. Agility is demonstrated at the Open level by asking the dog to jump over a panel jump, broad jump and bar jump. Lastly, scent work is found at the highest level, Utility, in which the dog must find an object with his handler’s scent among a pile of articles and return with the correct one.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) is perhaps the largest and most well-known venue for obedience. Though it currently only allows purebred dogs, the AKC Board of Directors is considering a listing service that would allow mixed breeds to participate in obedience, rally, agility and tracking. All dogs, including mixed breeds, are welcome to participate in obedience programs through the American Mixed Breed Obedience Registry (AMBOR), the Australian Shepherd Club of America (ASCA), St. Hubert’s Companion Dog Sports Program and the United Kennel Club (UKC).

UKC obedience competitor Ray Czubek of Illinois recently retired his mixed breed, J.D., one of only three dogs to earn her AMBOR Obedience Trial Championship. Having competed in both UKC with J.D. and in AKC with German Shepherds, Czubek finds the former to be more relaxing and family-oriented. But no matter where he participates, it’s working together with his dog that counts. “Most people are instant-gratification-oriented,” says Czubek. “I like the precision teamwork, and find it challenging to keep my dog motivated. You have to make the effort.”

Evolving Methods
At its earliest stages and well into the 1970s, dogs were taught obedience using punishment-avoidance techniques such as the “jerk and pull” method. People believed that if the dog experienced a negative consequence for not doing what was asked, that would be enough to create the preferred behavior. This worked for some dogs, though not all. Obedience training pioneer Terri Arnold of Massachusetts, who has earned multiple Obedience Trial Championships (OTCh) in AKC over more than 30 years, was one of the first to question and improve upon traditional training methods.

In the 1970s, when Arnold started training a Shetland Sheepdog, she soon realized that choke collars, harsh commands, and withholding praise or play would not work. But, she discovered, food was an excellent motivator, and she asked her trainer if she could bring some to class. He told her no. Her Sheltie performed wonderfully and happily at home with the food, but was miserable without it in class.

“I decided to sneak food into class, and it fell on the floor from her mouth,” says Arnold. “The instructor started screaming at me in front of the class, and I said, ‘I don’t need this anymore.’ I turned around and walked away. I knew there had to be a better way. I will never forget that day as long as I live. It was a turning point in my whole life.”

The introduction of operant conditioning and clicker training to competitive obedience over the past 10 years has fostered a growing movement toward more positive and motivational instruction. In his book Clicker Training for Obedience, Morgan Spector explains how operant conditioning and the use of the clicker can shape behaviors that, together, combine into a complete obedience exercise. Dogs learn step by step instead of being expected to learn an entire skill set all at once.

The Birth of Rally-O
For someone who has never shown a dog before, the formality of competitive obedience can be intimidating. With that in mind, the AKC and the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT) now offer Rally-O, a more fast-paced version of traditional obedience exercises, which takes place in a relaxed, though still competitive, setting. The judge creates a course in which the handler and dog follow numbered signs and perform the exercise described at each station. Rather than standing stiff and silent, handlers may use their upper bodies and talk to their dogs for encouragement.

“I love Rally,” says Certified Pet Dog Trainer Diane Lavigne of New York. “I think it’s a great way for a dog to get ring experience without going into the Novice [Obedience] ring. The exercises are based on what you need to do to get a Novice title.” Lavigne also competes in UKC and AMBOR obedience with her mixed breed Hershey, AKC obedience with her Golden Retriever Skye, and is training her young Golden, Eagle, for his competition debut. In December 2005, Hershey was ranked third in the nation by AMBOR for UKC Novice Obedience.

Added Value
If you take the time to find an instructor with whom you feel comfortable, you and your dog will enjoy obedience, rally or both. “As long as the training is not abusive, the benefits of training are immense,” says Lori Waters, whose pack includes AKC Obedience Trial Champion German Shepherd Lou, and Border Collie Mitch, who was the first dog in AKC history to earn Conformation Champion, Obedience Trial Champion and Champion Tracker titles. “Spending time together, and learning to communicate with each other strengthens the dog–handler bond like nothing else can. After spending thousands of hours training, traveling thousands of miles showing—not to mention spending thousands of dollars—with my dogs, the way you both grow together is unbelievable. Your dog gets the attention and goes places that other dogs can only dream about. They get to live a very full life and the handler gets to share it.”

Even if you’re not interested in competition, obedience training has value. “Obedience doesn’t benefit the dog,” says Arnold. “The obedient dog benefits, because then the dog can have a good life, a chance to run free and be a dog, whether it’s in a dog park or out in the woods somewhere. It’s the most amazing thing to me, people who let dogs free that they can’t control. Love is taking the time to train the dog to keep it safe.”

 

News: Guest Posts
Jedi Surfs
Surfers get furry

We were first introduced to Jedi through our Smiling Dog submissions, and we think Jedi Seja may be the next worldwide furry celebrity. Born on a puppy mill farm and surrendered to a rescue, Jedi had a rough start. Luckily he was then adopted by his parents Katie and Patrick Seja, and they’ve turned his life upside-down. His surfing career started in 2011, and has taken him across the nation for many surf competitions. Jedi’s interests include surfing, being an advocate for animals, working with charities, and smiling while having fun.

Good Dog: Activities & Sports
The Politics of Creating a Dog Park
Round two in the urban debate

This is a follow-up article to our political primer on dog park campaigning. We hope that you found some of the information helpful and that you are now ready to sit down with town planners and design that perfect dog park.

Let’s start by suggesting a different term for dog park. We know it’s an easy term to use, but it often evokes irate comments like: “What do you mean you want to spend my taxes on a bunch of dogs?”; “What about safe playground equipment for my kids?”; “Drinking fountains for dogs, you gotta be kidding!” Play it safe—try using terms like “off-leash” or “multi-use area,” stressing the human component at all times. The acronym-clever COLA people (Citizens for Off-Leash Areas in Seattle simply call theirs OLAs (a convention we’ll adopt here). In Berkeley, “multi-use area” refers to the multiple legitimate uses, including our leashless dogs, that are allowable in sections of the park. In Indianapolis they refer to their recently inaugurated area as a Canine Companion Zone.

In doing the research for this article and in talking with many of you who have contacted us for more information or to share your wisdom and experience, we realize that this material cannot be easily condensed into just two parts. So we will be turning this into a regular feature, with future reports including case studies from your parks.

A recap from last time: because most cities have leash laws that outlaw dogs running “at large,” you’ll need to change this policy.

But few policymakers or administrators are risk-takers; they’ll need reassurances that they are not the first to be confronted by a citizenry asking to use public land to recreate with a pack of off-leash dogs. This is to be followed by gentle and constant reminders that your request isn’t coming out of left field and you have the numbers to support your proposal (with signed petitions in hand), that you do pay taxes supporting everyone else’s recreational activity and, lastly, that you regularly consult with your dogs before voting. By doing most of your homework online you can find many excellent examples of successful programs (see resources) to bring to your town’s decision-makers. Now that you have piqued their interest, the next step is to lead them to the drawing table with design guidelines and planning criteria.

Guidelines can help move the process along but keep in mind that, as Mencken noted: “For every complex, difficult problem, there is a simple, easy solution … and it is wrong.” One of the first things we learned in gathering this information is that while it is tempting to use guidelines from other cities or even from other parks within the same city, they should be used judicially and only as outlines to help shape the planning process and not as across-the-board standards. As Judy Green, a veteran of off-leash planning in Virginia, cautioned, “it is important to remain as flexible as possible,” leaving room for “fine-tuning afterwards.” Site-specific and community-specific needs must be addressed. A fifty-acre area within a five-hundred acre park might be too small for one city, but in a dense urban area like New York it could be positively palatine.

It is beyond the scope of this space to write about macro-level planning issues or site analyses—we all know that a city should provide a series of neighborhood parks accessible to the daily needs for all its citizens, including those with dogs, with major municipal or regional parks available for special jaunts. In the ideal world, dogs would be welcomed to share the total park experience with us, as they do in Australia, and not only be limited to permitted sectors. Taking these limitations into consideration, we’ll concentrate on some guidelines for a prototypical off-leash park, if only in the abstract. Operational topics, such as sponsoring groups, user-permits and maintenance issues will be discussed in the next issue.

Size
If your OLA is located on a new site or built within an established park, size is the single most important and probably the most contentious criterion to be decided. Let it be suggested as a rule of thumb that the bigger the better. An off-leash area is similar to a computer: the day you buy one is the day it becomes outdated. With a smaller area (especially if it is the only facility servicing a wide area), you will quickly find that supply can’t match demand. Indianapolis experienced this when permits to their first Canine Companion Zone were sold out almost the day of the opening. They are now looking to open a second, larger canine zone in another park.

Some suggest that the auxiliary (i.e., neighborhood) off-leash parks be a minimum of three to five acres. Even though we agree with the larger end of this range, in many urban areas this is probably unattainable. For smaller parks or for the ones that can’t be easily “divided” into specific usage zones, a “time share” arrangement might be possible, with the park available to dog use in the early mornings and early evening hours. If this is your only option, as it is for many New Yorkers, try to obtain a liberal frame of permitted times (perhaps before 10 a.m. and after 4 p.m.), factoring in seasonal day length changes. The town of Petaluma, north of San Francisco, reports very successful results with a time-share program that is operational in all of its parks.

We disagree with policy papers that suggest that OLAs be restricted to a maximum of five acres. The rationale behind this limit is that a larger area would make monitoring more difficult. But there is abundant and convincing long-term evidence to ameliorate these concerns, coming from larger dog-friendly parks such as Pt. Isabel in Richmond, California (with nearly a million visits a year), Fort Funston in San Francisco, Marymoor Park in Redmond, Washington, Shawnee Mission Park in Johnson County, Kansas, and others. Ideally, OLAs should be large enough not only to accommodate human-with-dog recreational activities, like walking and jogging, but also to provide enough space where some of us can spend private time away from the fetch-and-chase set. Also, the larger the park the less likely that its resources, such as turf, will suffer from overuse.

Fencing
Another bone of possible contention is fencing. In parks close to traffic, fencing—with consideration for aesthetic concerns —might be necessary. In these cases, double entry, self-closing gates are recommended. Unless your dogs are into high hurtling, a four-foot fence should be adequate. Chain-link (vinyl-coated) fencing is probably the least expensive but some parks, as in Sacramento and Dupont Circle in DC, are looking into other alternatives like wrought iron (beware of the pointy pickets). Arlington Dogs’ Judy Green adds that fencing must extend to the ground and that if using chain-link, the bottom must be crimped to avoid injuries to the dogs. In larger multi-use parks, especially in areas away from traffic which have terrain features that provide natural demarcations and barriers away from other park uses, fencing might not be necessary. There are often serious disagreements over fencing. It can be the single most expensive item in the construction of OLAs, so securing the funding can hamper the progress of projects, especially if communities balk about paying for it. Sometimes dog people are asked to contribute to this expense. Putting aside the fairness question—are tennis players asked to pay for the fences on public courts?—some of you have turned into amazingly effective fund-raisers, getting financial assistance from local businesses. Pet stores and pet food companies should be eager to contribute and perhaps even sponsor your park. In some cases, fencing can also help allay fears of liability.

Children
Even though allowing children into OLAs is more of an operational than a design issue, is it usually during the design stage that this issue is addressed. Again bringing up the specter of liability issues, some communities have opted for not allowing children, even those accompanied by an adult, into their OLAs. We think this is unfortunate. It can add fuel to the children versus dog debate, and Judy Green thinks that it “doesn’t serve the dog community to perpetuate this idea that dogs are always to be feared.” Children should obviously be closely supervised in parks from all recreational activities, such as bicycling, inline skating, kite flying, as well as from dogs. Also, many families with dogs cannot afford the luxury of providing quality park time to their dogs, separate from the time they can spend with their children. Most parks do allow children but some take the precaution of noting on their signage that children under a certain age must be accompanied by an adult. Personally, we love seeing young parents with those new sports-model baby strollers wheeling their charges on the paths of the off-leash area with their dogs merrily running alongside. This goes to the essence of what these areas are all about—having a good time in our parks with those we love.

Other design considerations:

• Available parking that will not interfere with or disturb neighbors
• Compliance with American Disabilities Act requirements—service dogs and their companions should be urged to use OLAs
• Buffer Zones from neighbors who might be concerned about barking
• Conveniently-sited, covered trash receptacles and poop disposal product dispensers
• Bulletin boards for posting notices, raising public awareness, announcing training classes, etc.
• Shade trees, good drainage, maintain-able turf
• Water fountains with both human and dog-level spigots
• Clear, concise and aesthetically pleasing signage
• Benches, tables, agility equipment, swimming ponds
 

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