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News: Guest Posts
Call for Help in St. Louis
More volunteers needed for dogs rescued in huge raid.

The Humane Society of Missouri has been relying heavily on volunteers from animal welfare organizations over the past two months as it cares for nearly 500 animals rescued in an enormous federal dog-fighting raid on July 8. But more help is needed.
 
Hearings regarding the disposition of the dogs have not yet been schedule and the Humane Society expects to be caring for animals at least through the end of the month. According to volunteer manager Laura B. Renner, groups of volunteers are scheduled to assist at the temporary shelter through September 19, but are help is needed from September 20 through October 3. Specifically, volunteers will be asked to help with cleaning, feeding, watering and some socialization. The Humane Society of Missouri is able to reimburse for travel expenses as well as arrange and cover the cost of lodging.
 
Qualification Required to Volunteer: Volunteers must be currently employed by or volunteering with a rescue group or animal welfare agency, be at least 18-years-old, have animal-handling experience in a shelter/disaster situation, be able to perform tasks that can be physically demanding, and be available for 5 to 7 day deployments in St. Louis. Because this is a pending federal investigation, each volunteer will be issued an ID badge as well as be required to sign a confidentiality agreement.
 
Anyone who has these qualifications and is willing to help can contact Laura at lrenner@hsmo.org.
 

News: Karen B. London
He Walked His Dogs All the Time
That’s enough for me to like my neighbor

Years ago, when I lived in New Hampshire, I had an unpopular neighbor. Most of the people who lived near this man disliked him, and my own husband said that he made him uncomfortable. True, he wasn’t the friendliest man and was more likely to grunt at greetings than reply kindly. He was by no means the quietest one in the area, seeming to feel that 6 AM on a Saturday was a perfectly reasonable time to mow his lawn or use his chainsaw to cut wood. He parked his cars in places that inconvenienced us all, and was quick to file an official complaint if anyone hadn’t shoveled their walk after a snowfall. Generally speaking, he was a bad neighbor by most measures.

In spite of his faults, I never felt ill feelings towards him because he walked his dog several times a day, every day, no matter what the weather. For those of you who have not braved a New England winter, the weather can be foul for many months. (When it’s 20 below, my thoughts run more along the lines of “If it were 50 degrees warmer, it would STILL be freezing” than in the direction of “Let’s go walk the dog.”) But this man never missed a walk, and his happy, polite dog was the beneficiary of that wonderful habit. I was completely unable to dislike a person who was so good to his dog.

Have you noticed someone who is so good in some aspect of dog guardianship that you can look past all other transgressions? What does it take to earn a forgiveness pass from you?

News: Guest Posts
My Dog IS Smarter Than Your Honor Roll Student
A dog's mind is a terrible thing to waste.

Okay, I might be exaggerating a little bit. But a new study has shown that the "average dog can count, reason and recognize words and gestures on par with a human two-year-old." I think the increasing popularity of dog sports and interactive games, such as the Tug-A-Jug and Nina Ottosson's puzzles demonstrate that we're doing a better job of exercising our dogs' minds as well as their bodies.

 

Back in the day, dogs were bred for a certain job and that kept them physically and mentally fit. Now most family pets live a life of luxury - eating the best food, sleeping on the softest bed - but don't use their brains after completing Obedience 101. I keep my dogs mentally active by participating in dog sports and teaching them tricks using the clicker. If you want some ideas, check out these great trick-training videos of Rounder the rescue Rhodesian Ridgeback. 

 

How do you encourage your dog to use his brain?

News: Guest Posts
The “D” Word
Don’t miss your chance to howl with Lily Tomlin.

Actress, comedian, dog lover and animal welfare do-gooder Lily Tomlin headlines in Provincetown, Mass., on August 29 in a one-night-only show to benefit Pilgrim Bark Park, a new, nonprofit, off-leash dog park and animal welfare resource. Did you think Tomlin's Edith Ann and Buster the dog routine was pure shtick? Think again, and read about  Tomlin’s passion for animals in The Bark interview.)

 

The fundraiser will help park organizers pay off a $30,000 loan, which was taken out to make the park wheelchair accessible, and also to fund much-needed shade pavilions.

Opened in 2009, Pilgrim Bark Park was established to reflect the town’s love of dogs and provide animal welfare resources to the community. Reflecting Provincetown’s history as an artist colony, the park is dotted with benches and doghouses designed and painted by local artists. The park is supported exclusively by volunteers and private donations.
 
DETAILS: Saturday, August 29, MacMillan Pier on Provincetown Harbor. Look for Ernestine, who will be wandering along the pier during the silent and live auction, which begins at 5 pm. Tomlin’s show, “The ‘D’ Word,” hosted by Kate Clinton, begins at 8 pm. Tickets are $75-$250 and available online at www.onlyatthecrown.com.

 

For those of us too far away to make the Tomlin show, here’s the classic clip of Edith Ann describing the go-for-broke sandwich she made for her dog, Buster:

News: JoAnna Lou
Surf’s Up
Canines ride the waves in San Diego for a good cause.

After writing last week about pet friendly cities, I started reading more about San Diego’s Surf Dog Surf-A-Thon. The annual event invites both humane and canine surfers to Del Mar’s dog beach to raise money for the Helen Woodward Animal Center and to promote responsible pet ownership.

The participants raise money for homeless animals based on the number of waves they catch in 30 minutes. The event isn’t until September 13, but organizers expect more than 100 pups to participate from as far away as Japan.  

Not sure if your dog has what it takes? Helen Woodward Animal Center has organized training clinics so your four legged beach bum can learn how to ride the waves. The next session will take place on August 16 and 22 from 9-11 am at Del Mar’s dog beach. Surf boards are provided, but instructor and dog trainer, Rob Kuty, recommends bringing a canine life jacket.

Do you think your pets would like surfing?

News: Karen B. London
Agility Favorites
What obstacle does your dog prefer?

I had a dog whose favorite part of an agility course was the table. My theory is that it made the most sense to him. It was the first piece of equipment that he learned how to negotiate correctly, and it seemed as though he always knew what to do with it, unlike some other obstacles, which periodically confused him. I loved this dog, but he was, hmm, how best to say it—not the brightest dog I have known. He enjoyed the things in his life that were straightforward, and that’s why I think he liked the table.

Does your dog have a favorite agility obstacle, and if so, what do you think that tells you about your dog?

 

News: Guest Posts
Barking Buddha
Stretch and connect with your dog through yoga.

Last week, I attended a book signing for Barking Buddha: Simple Soul Stretches for Yogi and Dogi. I was thrilled to pick up my own copy of the hot-of-the-presses guidebook by home-town yogini and massage therapist Brenda Bryan (with photos by my friend Bev Sparks). I swear this was before I learned the book includes a little profile shot of my dog Lulu in one of Bryan’s classes. Just look for the black dog who exudes not an iota of the serene grace of the Afghan Hound on the neighboring mat. That’s Lulu. The photo is not a case of bad timing but a true reflection of our experience in the class—we were both of us woefully over-stimulated. But that was our problem.

I was impressed and inspired by Bryan with her dogis—Honey and Gus—and the other novices in the class. All around me dog-human pairs practicing “Floating Dog” and “Woofing Warrior” in a Seattle dog daycare, with lots of barking and romping only yards away, and yet calm pervaded the room. I think Bryan’s addition of massage to the regular regime of breathing, stretching and poses, encourages the dogs into the right frame of mind, at the same time it nurtures connection. The class helped me to appreciate that Doga, as it is sometimes called, provides a very real opportunity for enhancing your dog’s health, your understanding of how his or her body feels and moves, and, maybe most importantly, your bond with each other.

While a class with Bryan or a dog-centric yogi near you is probably the best introduction, Barking Buddha provides a smart, straightforward primer for home practice. If you don't believe me, watch the seriously blissed-out pups in Bryan’s video pitch for the book, below.

News: Guest Posts
Take Your Dog to Work Day Contests
Share tips, photos—win prizes, fame (sort of)

[UPDATE: We have a winner! Read about Stacy Dubuc and Ginger.]

 

We’re excited about Take Your Dog to Work Day on June 26—not just because it’s something we do nearly everyday but because we know under the right circumstances ice-breaking, comforting balls of fur at the office can be good for the dogs and for their people.

So, we’ve come up with two ways to share our enthusiasm for canines near the copier with two—yup, two—Take your Dog to Work contests.

Tell us your strategies for bringing your dog to work. Post your tried-and-true advice as a comment below, and we’ll select one lucky tipster from the entries to receive a Bark goodie bag. We also start the ball rolling with some of our own ideas with something we call “Office Petiquette” in a sec.

If you’re more the picture’s-worth-a-thousand-barks type, send us a photo of your office dog (your own or a colleagues’), and we’ll include our favorites in our Dogs @ Work slideshow. It’s easy.

Office Petiquette
Pet-friendly workplace policies vary, but they usually include several basic elements: The needs of people who have allergies or don’t want to work near animals must be accommodated, pets must be housebroken and kept on leash or under control, and employees must clean up after their pet outside. Here are other “petiquette” points and suggestions for pet-proofing your work zone:

•Your dog should respond to basic commands, such as “sit” and “stay.”

•Your dog should be socialized to people and other dogs.

•Your personal workspace should comfortably accommodate your dog.

•Keep a supply of chew toys on hand to occupy your dog when needed.

•Leave squeaky toys at home, and invest in dog tag “silencers.”

•No fleas at work! Keep your dog clean and well-groomed.

•Walk your dog in a designated area several times a day, and clean up afterward.

Above all, consider your dog’s temperament. If she’s extremely shy or uncomfortable around strangers, the workplace may be too overwhelming. And, of course, if she has a history of aggressive behavior, leave her at home and get help from a professional trainer or behaviorist.

Source: SF/SPCA

5 Tips for a Dog-Safe Office
•Keep small items (paper clips, loose change, staples, rubber bands) off the floor.

•Store ink cartridges, pens, markers and highlighters out of your dog’s reach.

•Put cleaning solutions in a safe place; they can be toxic and potentially deadly.

•Leave shredders unplugged to protect dangling ears and tails.

•Contain your dog if you can’t supervise him.

News: Karen B. London
Strut Your Mutt
What’s the best dog event around?

Recently I was a judge at “Strut Your Mutt” in Flagstaff, Ariz. The annual event is the work of Paw Placement of Northern Arizona, a local group that does great work finding forever homes for dogs and cats.

On this particular Saturday, we three judges had to observe dog-people pairs entered into the official “Strut” competition and determine three winners. The categories were 1) Best Strut, which was won by a Bulldog who successfully walked the entire loop multiple times (though was too tuckered out to come claim her prize); 2) Person-Dog Look-Alike, which was won by a willowy strawberry blond young lady and her fawn colored greyhound, both of whom looked lovely in their hula skirts, and 3) Judges’ Choice, which went to a three-legged dog named Lucky who had been adopted out by Paw Placement of Northern Arizona, and is indeed one of their great success stories.

Besides enjoying the event with its demos of canine sports and assorted vendors, and being thrilled about the fundraising success, “Strut Your Mutt” made me realize that we can never get too much of mixing and mingling with other people and their dogs en masse. It’s such fun to celebrate and enjoy the unique human-canine bond, and the fact that such events lead to happiness all around—in both species.

What events happen in your area to inspire interspecies fun, and perhaps raise money to spread that joy around still further?

News: Guest Posts
Adopt-A-Pet’s “Social Petworking”
Inspired use of the Internet or peer-pressure with a downside?

On the Internet, good ideas (and I guess, lousy ideas, as well) spread like viruses. In the January issue of The Bark, we wrote about how Dogs Trust in the United Kingdom found a home for a shelter dog using only a brief message on Twitter, the social networking service. It was the first Twitter-assisted placement for Dogs Trust, and maybe a first-ever.

That was followed in February by a Tweet Blast masterminded by Animal Rescue Online—24 hours of  Twitter messaging (no more than 140 characters each) all aimed at finding homes for homeless companion animals.

But these were mere flashes in pans compared to Adopt-A-Pet.com’s new scheme, cleverly branded as “Social PETworking.” The idea is to encourage regular MySpace, Facebook and Twitter users and bloggers “to advertise adoptable pets to their friends as a way to help homeless pets get seen and adopted.”

The campaign kicked off at the beginning of June, with a goal of networking at least 30,000 homeless pets in the first 30 days. Essentially animal lovers find and share Adopt-A-Pet profiles of shelter animals (dogs, cats, rabbits, horses, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish and more) with friends who might provide good homes or who know others who might.

When I checked the site on June 12, more than 35,000 links had been shared. That’s definitely something. Whether it leads to successful adoptions remains to be demonstrated. I hope it doesn’t increase impulse decisions. It’s one thing if someone who understands the responsibilities of adoption and is looking for a new friend learns about a wonderful animal in need of a home. But I know how hard it is to resist the sweet mug of a doleful puppy with a sad story. I worry that this sort of widespread friend-to-friend “advertising” inspires people to commit to animals when they aren’t ready.

Am I just being a buzzkill? 

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