Home
blog
News: JoAnna Lou
Pet Amenities in City Apartments
Residential developments are increasingly catering to dog lovers.
Finding pet friendly apartments is a common challenge, but in recent years, upscale residential buildings are increasingly catering to dog lovers. Many buildings are adding amenities such as pet wash stations, play areas, and day care and grooming services.

According to research organization Urban Land Institute, these kinds of amenities first began cropping up in the early 2000s and took off more recently as the real estate industry recovered from the economic downturn. This was further fueled by millennials who are typically postponing marriage and kids, and adopting pets instead.

Dogs also represent a new revenue source for the real estate industry through pet fees, for just having your pup in the apartment, or membership fees, for the special amenities. Typically there's a monthly or annual cost for these services, which ranges from $250-$750 (the later including daily day care and dog walking). Daria Salusbury, senior vice president at The Related Companies, says that the pet amenities are an important way of showing residents that they understand their lifestyle. But there's obviously a significant financial incentive as well!

About a decade ago, her company first experimented with adding small, unstaffed grooming stations in a couple of its buildings. Now they've gone all out, with their comprehensive Dog City program, which offers in-building day care, training, and weekly visits from groomers and veterinarians. Since it's not easy to travel with dogs in New York via subway or taxi, this is a huge convenience.

Dog City's first branch, a 1,000 square foot space, opened five years ago in a New York City complex, featuring an outdoor terrace and bone-shaped pool. It was so popular, an expansion was immediately planned. Their newest Manhattan location will even offer boarding facilities.

Other developments, like the Gotham Organization's buildings, weren't ready to take the leap on permanent amenities. So they partnered with canine spa Spot Experience to negotiate discounts and arrange for a van that picks up canine residents to bring them to Spot.

While many New Yorkers are grateful just to find an apartment that welcomes their furry family members, buildings with these amenities make a big difference living in a city with so much concrete. These apartments also build a like-minded community that's fun to be a part of. I hope that the popularity of these amenities will cause a trickle down effect to non-luxury buildings as well!

News: JoAnna Lou
Secondhand Smoke and Pets
Study links health risks to dogs living in smoking environments.
The danger of cigarettes is well known, but people often overlook how secondhand smoke will effect our pets.

Professor Clare Knottenbelt at the University of Glasgow would like to change that by creating more awareness and understanding through her research. So far her team has shown a direct link between pets living in a smoking environment and a higher risk of health problems. Previous studies have shown a link to cancer risk, but the new research also uncovered a connection to weight gain in castrated dogs.

When the scientists examined the testicles of male dogs post-neutering, they found a gene that they believe acts as a marker of cell damage since it appears more often in dogs living in smoking homes versus non-smoking homes. In other studies, this gene has been shown to be altered in dogs with certain canine cancers. However, the effect on this gene was reduced when owners chose to smoke outside to reduce their pets' exposure. So this is a way for people to limit their pets' risk if they can't outright quit.

Interestingly, the researchers found that cats are even more affected by smoke than dogs. The hypothesis is that self-grooming may increase the amount of smoke ingested. Free access to the outdoors didn't significantly help reduce risk.

Clare's research is ongoing and is expected to be published later this year. However, I think the early findings, combined with what we already know about the effects of smoking, makes a compelling reason to quit smoking, or at least limit it as much as you can.

 
News: Karen B. London
Football Playoffs—All About the Dogs
Governors’ wager on NFL football game is personal

Football playoffs often involve trash talking and betting, but this year, there are dogs involved, so it’s obviously getting serious. In the NFC Championship game this Sunday, there’s a trip to the Super Bowl on the line for the Arizona Cardinals and the Carolina Panthers, but for the governors of Arizona and North Carolina, their dogs’ honor is at stake.

Governor Doug Ducey of Arizona and Governor Pat McCrory of North Carolina have made a friendly wager. If Arizona wins, McCrory’s Lab mix Moe will have to wear a Cardinals’ jersey. If Carolina wins, then Ducey’s Golden Retriever Woody will be sporting a Panther’s jersey. Luckily, these handsome dogs will look great in anything, so they are unlikely to suffer no matter what happens.

Either governor, on the other hand, would no doubt be distressed to see a beloved dog wearing the other team’s jersey. As close as we are to our dogs, it just feels wrong to have our dogs wearing enemy colors.

Ducey has tweeted, “AZ Cardinals, we can’t let Woody wear a Panthers jersey! Let’s get this done” and McCrory has said, I am confident that our Carolina Panthers are going to be victorious on Sunday, so that our beloved rescue dog Moe doesn’t have to suffer wearing a Cardinals jersey.”

I don’t care all that much about the game’s outcome. Yes, I live in Arizona, but I have family in North Carolina and I’m a Packers fan anyway. I’m just happy to see two governors expressing affection for their dogs.

News: Editors
Recognizing Shelter Heroes

Behind every rescued animal there stands a group of unsung heroes. Those people who make dog and cat adoptions possible — a team of shelter workers, trainers, foster parents and volunteers who shepherd each animal from their first day to, hopefully, a forever home. With dedication, hope, expertise and above all, hard work … they persevere, believing that every animal deserves a second chance at happiness and love. We salute their commitment, and strive to bring their stories to light.

The Bark has partnered with Halo to proudly present SHELTER HEROES — a program that recognizes outstanding individuals helping homeless animals find their forever homes. For the next several months, The Bark will be shining the spotlight on these shelter heroes, as well as publishing the best practices and recipes for successful animal adoptions. Together, we can make a difference.

Do You Know a Shelter Hero? Do you know an animal shelter worker or volunteer who stands out for their dedication, innovation and hard work? Somebody who is making a special impact in your community? We want to hear about them and tell their story to inspire others. We want to recognize their efforts and share their success. Go to our online entry and help us find the real shelter heroes in your community.

One special hero will be selected to be profiled in The Bark and the shelter they represent will be provided with 10,000 bowls of Halo dog food, courtesy of Freekibble.com. Other notable heroes will be featured on thebark.com. For rules and eligibility, click here.

News: Karen B. London
Fur Kid, Pet, Family Member, Best Friend, Dog
How do you refer to your canine companion?

The way that we refer to our associates says a lot about the relationship. Several decades ago, there was a very awkward period when many couples began to live together without being married, and boyfriend/girlfriend seemed inadequate. Partner and life partner became more common. The very cumbersome term coined by the United States Census Bureau “POSSLQ” (Person of Opposite Sex Sharing Living Quarters) never achieved widespread use. The change in relationships—serious and not married—gave rise to a number of new ways to refer to each other.

Now, I think we are in the middle of a similar period of trying out terms with our dogs as our view of human-canine relationship changes. We already switched the way we refer to ourselves in relation to our dogs. The antiquated term “master” is (thankfully) hardly ever seen, and owner is also less common. The terms guardian and pet parent seem to be on the rise.

The special canines in our lives have long been called “my dog” or “my best friend” but these are hardly the only options any more. I hear people refer to dogs as their fur kids, their four-legged kids, or just as their family members.

Personally, I lean towards saying “my dog” because I like the benefit of the simple description without the opportunity for unwanted connotation. To me, it seems that there is great love and respect in the term “dog,” as it is one of my very favorite species. I understand why many people prefer terms that more directly take note of the familial relationship, and I think there is great value in that. I also realize that many people consider the possessive “my” problematic with dogs as it suggests ownership, but I also say, “my sons” and “my husband” without suggesting that I own them.

How do you refer to the dogs in your life, and why? Has your terminology changed over time?

News: Editors
Winter Safety Tips for Dogs

While we on the west coast are contending with a very robust El Nino rainy season, we aren’t complaining after so many years of drought. But it does make dog walks and exercising extra challenging. But for most of the rest of the country dealing with harsh and cold winter weather is even more difficult. So today when we received a press release from the Central Veterinary Associates in Long Island, NY we thought that they had many good ideas to help you prepare for wintery conditions.

● Always Dry Off: When your dog comes in from the snow, ice or sleet, be sure to thoroughly wipe down their paws and stomach. He or she may have rock salt, antifreeze or other potentially dangerous chemicals on their paws which, if ingested, can cause severe stomach problems. Antifreeze should especially be watched for as it can lead to kidney failure. In addition, paw pads may get cut from hard snow or encrusted ice, so it’s important to check them over and treat them accordingly.


● Hold Off on Haircuts: Save for extreme circumstances, you should never shave down your dog during the winter. Their long, thick coats are vital for protection from the cold. If you have a short-haired breed, consider getting him a coat or a sweater with a high collar or turtleneck with coverage from the base of the tail to the belly.


● Keep Bedtime Warm: Make sure your dog has a warm place to sleep, off the floor and away from all drafty areas. A cozy pet bed with a warm blanket or pillow is ideal.


● Bathroom Breaks: If you have a puppy or aging pet that may be sensitive to the cold, it may be difficult to take them outside. Use wee-pads or old newspapers to train puppies or to allow older pets to relieve themselves.


● Bring Pets Inside: If domesticated animals are left outdoors during winter months, they run the risk of health conditions caused by extreme temperatures. Cats are especially susceptible as they have free reign of the outdoors, and become lost during a storm, or taken in by a neighbor. In similar fashion to summer months, you should never leave your pet alone in a car in cold weather, as they could freeze and develop serious cold-related health conditions.


● Keep a Short Leash: Never let your dog off the leash on snow or ice, especially during a snowstorm as they can lose their scent and easily become lost. More dogs are lost during the winter than any other season, so make sure that your dog always wears his identification tags. It is highly recommended that all pets are outfitted with a microchipping device, which it makes available as part of a low-cost service.


● Check Your Engine: As you’re getting into your car in the morning, bang loudly on the hood of the car before getting in. Outdoor cats and wild animals like to sleep under cars or within the engine compartment or wheel base, as the engines keep the vehicle warm long after the car is parked. However, once the car is started or in motion, the cat can be injured or killed by the fan belt or tires.


● Clean Up Spills: If you spill any antifreeze or winter-weather windshield fluid, be sure to clean it up immediately. Pets, especially cats, are enticed by the sweet-tasting liquid, but it is poisonous. Ingesting antifreeze leads to potentially life-threatening illness in all animals, domesticated or otherwise. If possible, use products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol.
 

Also, Dr. Aaron Vine, DVM, Vice President, Central Veterinary Associates adds that, “It is very important to keep your pet safe and healthy during the winter season, especially during storms like the one in the forecast this weekend. The extreme cold may have an adverse effect on your pet’s health, so pet owners must take the necessary precautions for their pets when bringing them outside. It is especially important during extreme weather circumstances to ensure that your pet is microchipped, which makes it easier to locate them. In the event they become ill as a result of being exposed to the elements, please bring them to a veterinarian immediately.”
 

Do check out their Holiday Safety Tips blog and visit www.centralvets.com.
 

 

News: JoAnna Lou
Anderson Cooper Honors Police Dog
The CNN anchor donates ballistic vests to the Norfolk Police K9 Unit.

Three days after Krijger, a Norfolk, Virginia police dog, was shot and killed in a standoff following a domestic dispute, Anderson Cooper made a touching tribute in memory of the heroic Belgian Malinois.

The CNN anchor donated his fee from an upcoming lecture in Norfolk to buy 18 canine ballistic vests for the city’s police dogs. It’s likely that Krijger would have survived if he was wearing one of the $2,200 Kevlar vests.

The donation was facilitated by Spike’s K9 Fund, an organization started by retired SEAL, Jimmy Hatch to help military and police pups. The non-profit is named after Jimmy’s loyal war dog, Spike, who was killed in Iraq back in 2006.  

Jimmy also volunteers with the police department, sharing advice learned while handling dogs in combat zones. Through that work, Jimmy knew Krijger, so he was extra determined to create a fundraiser to honor him. After seeing the effort on social media, Anderson contacted Jimmy to help out. The two had met last year when Anderson interviewed Jimmy about Spike’s K9 Fund.

The police plan on holding a memorial service for Krijger next Tuesday at the Norfolk Police K9 Range, followed by an interment with full police honors at the Garden of the Pines Pet Cemetery in Virginia Beach. While both services are private, the public is invited to pay tribute along the funeral procession route.

News: Shirley Zindler
A Holiday Visit with Dillon and Molly

My last blog I wrote about Dillon and Molly, my two elderly foster dogs who lost their home in the devastating Valley Fires. The entire time that Dillon and Molly were in the shelter their 92 year old owner, Karen, was unable to visit. When the dogs came home with me I was determined to change that. I was able to reach the family members that Karen was staying with and arranged to bring the dogs to visit. I really didn’t know what to expect. It had been months since they had last seen each other and under terrifying circumstances as they fled the roaring fire.

The old dogs seemed happy to go on an adventure and scrambled to climb into my car. Both are frail with bad hips and I had to lift them the last little bit into the vehicle but they rode happily for the hour and a half drive. My friend Angie came along to help and the time passed quickly in good conversation. When we arrived a grandson greeted us at the door and invited us into the small cluttered room where multiple family members had been staying since the fire. Molly and Dillon heard a voice across the darkened room and dragged me to where Karen sat in a comfy chair dimly lit by the sliding glass door behind her. Karen’s shaking voice cried out “I thought I would never see you again!” as Dillon pulled me to her and buried his huge head in her lap with Molly following. It was hard to see through my tears but I could hear Karen saying “I love you, I love you” over and over.

Molly had greeted Karen eagerly but was somewhat restless and paced around the room. I had been told that Dillon had always been totally devoted to Karen and sure enough, he wouldn’t leave her side. His hips gave out a few minutes later and he collapsed next to her while she stroked him over and over.  We chatted for a while and the entire time Karen’s frail hands were on Dillon’s big noble head. Karen kept saying that she was going to get a place where she could have the dogs and I told her that of course when that happened I would bring the dogs back to her. After a while I could see that Karen was tiring and we prepared to leave. I promised her that we would try to visit again and that I would take good care of her dogs as long as needed.

The dogs slept quietly on the way home and Angie and I chatted about the experience. It had been a wonderful reunion but we both knew that chances were slim that Karen would be able to find a place where she could have her two large dogs. Still, we can always dream.  

News: JoAnna Lou
Quiet Fireworks
An Italian town considers banning loud pyrotechnics in consideration of animals.
While most people are thrilled by fireworks, dog families often brace themselves around holidays like Forth of July because many pets are afraid of the loud noises. Not only are these sounds out of the ordinary, they're extremely deafening, especially for sensitive animal ears. Every year, there are always stories about dogs who ran away from home after being startled by fireworks.

Domestic pets aren't the only animals to be affected. Researchers at the University of Guelph and Acadia University found that fireworks can disorient flying birds, even causing some to abandon their nests. Scientists also discovered that the day after fireworks, hens show extremely low egg production with an increase in malformed eggs.

The town of Collecchio, in the province of Parma, Italy, was concerned enough by these effects that their local government introduced legislation to mandate the use of quiet fireworks as a way of respecting animals and reducing stress. As crazy as it sounds, these fireworks do exist! The Italian company Setti is just one company that sells products to create a light show without the loud noises.

  I hope that the use of quiet fireworks becomes more popular around the world!
News: Karen B. London
Do You Need Some More Personal Space?
No, thanks, I have a dog so I’m used to being crowded

I don’t have a large personal space, which works out great given the amount of time I spend with dogs. Many dogs choose to be right next to or on top of others in their social circles. Some only act this way with their best friends, but for others, anybody nearby will do.

Personal preferences vary among the canine set, just as they do within our own species. There are certainly dogs who really need space and don’t care for a lot of physical contact. Such dogs never try to sit on your head. However, there are lots of dogs who consider any space between themselves and others to be too much distance.

It may not always be pleasant to live with dogs who violate your personal space, but the photographs of them doing it can be pretty hilarious. Here are some excellent examples of such pictures.

Do you have a dog who would rather be on top of (or right next to) you, another dog or even the family cat?

Pages