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News: Editors
Dexter Needs a New Home

Update 9/7/2012: Good news! Dexter has been adopted. Thanks for all your interest, hope you too find that perfect dog.

Dexter is one great dog—a Jack Russell Terrier, active, super intelligent and loving. He is two and a half years old, neutered, and weighs around 18 lbs. My friend, Carol, his human mom, died of a heart attack recently and he needs a new forever home. Another friend of his mom’s is now fostering him. She has three other dogs so it is difficult for her to provide him the amount of exercise he needs. He loves playing ball and she does take him to Pt. Isabel to play chuck-it, but only once a day. He needs two good exercise sessions a day (as most young dogs do).

Dexter was raised with two Huskies, and is getting along great in his foster home with two larger old dogs, positively loving the Keeshond. He has no problems with dogs at the dog park or while walking on leash and is fine with all adult humans he has met. He might be too active for young children but he hasn’t been tested yet with a child.

For a JRT, he is an obedient, happy little pup who just needs a lot more activity than his foster person can give him. He is housetrained, sits and walks like a prince on leash. He’s not destructive, travels well in cars and likes to give loads of kisses. But he is also a typical Terrier, so it is important that he goes to a home with someone familiar with this breed type.

If you like Terriers with their tenacious, loyal hearts and want a young and active happy dog to share your life, please email us. Dexter currently lives near Berkeley. Help us find him a great home!

 

News: Shea Cox
DIY Physical Exam: An “owner’s manual” for your dog Part 2
Part 2 in 4 part guide

Hello again, Bark readers!  Welcome back for the second installment of the DIY physical exam.  We are going to start at the head today, continuing to move down the dog body over the next couple of weeks. 

NOSE: 

Normal:  

  • Smooth, soft and clean; it is a misconception that a dry, warm nose means illness; sometimes a normal nose can appear slightly dry as well as warm to the touch; a healthy nose should feel like soft, supple leather; it is not necessarily always cool, wet and moist.

Abnormal: 

  • Excessively dry and cracked.
  • Colored nasal discharge; a green, yellow, or white discharge generally indicates a bacterial infection (scant, clear, watery discharge can be normal) .
  • Bleeding

EYES:

Normal

  • Bright, moist, and clear.
  • Centered between the eyelid.
  • Pupils are equal in size.
  • Whites of the eye should not appear colored (such as red or yellow) and should have only a few visible blood vessels.
  • Pupils should shrink equally when a bright light is shined into either eye and enlarge equally when the eyes are held closed or the room darkened (this is known as a pupillary light reflex and is part of a neurological exam).

Abnormal

  • Dull, sunken eyes: this can indicate severe dehydration.
  • Eyes that appear dry and “bloodshot” can indicate conditions such as uveitis, KCS (“dry eye”), severe dehydration, or other systemic illnesses.
  • Thick discharge from eyes: a little grey “eye booger” in the morning is normal, just like in us people, but be concerned if you notice any discharge with green or yellow color to it.
  • One or both eyes not centered: this can indicate a tumor or infection behind the eye, as well as other pathology.
  • Pupils unequal in size: this can indicate head trauma, a possible tumor, other neurologic problems to name a few.
  • Squinting or tearing of the eyes: this can indicate an ulcer or scratch on the cornea, which is the layer of cells covering the eye.
  • Abnormal colors that indicate problems are yellow (jaundice), or red (bloodshot); pay close attention to the color of the whites of your pet’s eyes.
  • The appearance of blood in the eye (known as hyphema): this can indicate exposure to rat bait or other causes of your pet’s blood not being able to properly clot.
  • Pupils fail to respond, or respond differently from one another, when a bright light is shined into either eye.

EARS:

Chronic ear problems are common in pets, and are often a result of allergies to inhaled pollen (like hay fever in people) that are then complicated by secondary infections with bacteria or yeast. Ear infections can be painful and head shaking can lead to an accumulation of blood in the floppy part of the ear, known as an aural hematoma.

Normal

  • Skin smooth and without wounds.
  • Clean and dry.
  • Almost odor-free.
  • Typical carriage for breed.
  • Pain-free when you massage them, especially at the base of the ear.

Abnormal

  • Wounds, scabs, or any sign of rash.
  • Crust, moisture, or other discharge in ear canal.
  • Any strong odor.
  • Atypical carriage for breed; for example, a droopy ear in a breed with normally erect ears
  • Painful or swollen ears.

MOUTH:

Normal

  • Teeth are clean and white.
  • Gums are uniformly pink and moist to the touch (they should not feel dry or sticky).
  • Capillary refill time (CRT): to assess, press on the gum tissue with your finger or thumb and then release quickly; the part you just pushed on will turn white, and you will then watch the color return to the gums; this is a crude assessment of how well the heart and circulatory system are working as well as hydration status of you pet; a normal CRT is 1 to 1.5 seconds for the color to return; this can be a difficult test to interpret sometimes (for example, if your pet has dark or pigmented gums), and should not be relied upon as definitive evidence that your pet is sick or healthy.

Abnormal

  • Tartar accumulation around the base of the teeth.
  • The gums are red: this can indicate severe dehydration, shock, heat stroke, or sepsis (severe infection in the body).
  • Gums are bluish or purple: this indicates inadequate oxygen to the body; this can be noted with lung disease, heart disease, or any disease that impairs proper oxygen to the body.
  • Gums are pale: this is due to lack of blood or shock and possible causes are internal bleeding (such as a mass on a spleen that suddenly ruptures and bleeds- very common in older dogs), trauma or shock (such as when a dog has been hit by a car), and immune mediated diseases.
  • Gums that appear to have little bruises: this is known as petechiation and is generally seen with rat bait toxicity or other problems with the body’s ability to clot the blood
  • Gums are inflamed, “spongy” looking, or sore in appearance.
  • A sluggish CRT, or dry and sticky gums.

 

That completes the head!  Please feel free to ask any questions and see you next week as we discuss and learn about the chest area, known as the thorax. Check out DIY Physical Exam: Part 1 of this series if you missed it. Next, DIY Physical Exam: Part 3.

 

News: Letters
Lizzie, Another Real Dog
Dream Dog Awakening

The process Laurel Seville went through with Ainsley is so similar to mine with Lizzie that it’s eerie. Although Lizzie is not a rescue, she went from getting her CGC and therapy-dog certification right after her first birthday to barking and lunging at strangers, especially strange dogs, two years later. Although she never really enjoyed therapy visits, I pushed her because I wanted her to be good at it. My dream was for her to be a canine Mother Theresa. When it became obvious that she was not going to be, I too cried, got mad and tried to pretend I could manage it without really fixing it.

Somewhere along the way, I reread Suzanne Clothier’s Bones Would Rain from the Sky, then had my epiphany: she was what she was and would never be my dream dog, and I needed to accept that. It was hard to listen to family and friends, and have them give me “that look” when she acted out. Like, For this you go to training every week? I was the family’s dog-whisperer—how could I not have a well-behaved dog? Then I followed Seville’s route: I scoured the Internet, spent a fortune on training books and DVDs, bugged the heck out of my training buddies, and am still hooked on Yahoo dog forums. Basically, I made her worse before I started to make her better. Now, I never leave the house without a clicker and a pocketful of treats. My favorite line in the essay is “a dog who is trying hard to sit still and look for treats even though she wants to be Cujo.”

Perfect! I hope Saville contributes again to Bark.

News: Guest Posts
Conservation Pup In-Training: Part IV

 

It sure is HOT in Texas right now, and it’s not helping that Conservation Puppy-in-Training Ranger is on FIRE!! My little boy is growing up, and his potential is also growing in leaps and bounds. It is very important that our dogs are acclimated to the heat and humidity here in Texas, as it will be very useful later on when they are working in the field and make them less susceptible to heat related problems.

We take a lot of precautions to make sure our dogs are never at risk for heatstroke. Working during the heat of the day is nearly impossible for any length of time, so training right now is limited to mornings and evenings. Water is available at al times of course and here on the farm where Ranger is growing up there are several ponds that he is able to cool off in. We also started using these fantastic Swamp Coolers that Backcountry K9 generously donated to us (along with some life jackets!) which are nice to have on hand if necessary. The risks are very real for both people and animals, and all pet owners need to be extra careful right now.

Older animals do not tolerate the heat like their younger counterparts do, and in my household our oldest canine friend started going downhill these last few months. If you remember my very first blog, we lost one of our old Pointers, Kammo, in April, which left us with Purdy the geriatric Pointer-mix, Riley the Golden Retriever, Tank the Frenchie and of course, Ranger. Well, after saying for many years that Purdy was like the Energizer Bunny, she finally started to show her 15 years of age. She also developed a heart condition in the last month, and despite every effort to medicate, feed, and spoil, it was time for us to say goodbye to our Matriarch.

Many of you will sympathize with me and have had to say goodbye to a beloved animal or person. We knew we had only days left with Miss Purdy, and we tried to keep her comfortable and I took her on as many walks as her frail body could take. She always loved walking and swimming in the ponds, but more recently she started having problems swimming and had nearly drowned several times. By now she was content to just lie by the waters edge, her eyes having lost much of the sparkle they always had.

On Saturday morning we woke up and realized it was time to help Purdy cross the Rainbow Bridge. My husband, daughter and I all said our goodbyes, and I held her head and stroked her beautiful black fur while she fell asleep for the last time. It was probably the hardest thing I have ever had to do, but there was never any doubt that it was the right time.

Purdy was born in South Africa and spent her glory days chasing monkeys and antelope through the forests. Her ashes will be traveling with me to South Africa in September, where my husband plans to sprinkle them in the same forest she used to run in.

My trip to South Africa for the whole month of September will be full of adventures. I will be visiting the highly esteemed Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia to see their Livestock Guardian Dog Program as well as some new cheetah scat detection dogs they have just acquired! I also hope to visit with Green Dogs Conservation based in South Africa to meet their Livestock Guardian Dogs and Conservation K9’s that are being trained for so many valuable jobs related to Wildlife Conservation… plus they have PUPPIES right now.)

My next blog will be full of great photos and adventures from my Africa trip, and I cannot wait to tell you all about it. In the meantime, please take some time to “like” us and share this wonderful cause on Facebook or check out our Website… we appreciate everyone’s support so far, particularly our wonderful sponsors and donors. This was a great month for us and we got some great gear for the dogs.

EzyDog donated us some awesome harnesses that will be great for working the dogs in the field. We also had a beautiful commissioned portrait of Conservation K9 “Bea” donated to us by Melissa King from Pawblo Picasso (great name right!) that we plan on using for various fundraising efforts! You can see the painting and read Melissa’s blog HERE.

News: Letters
Adopting Tucker
Dream Dog Awakening
Border Collie

Recently while waiting for my endodontist appointment, I picked up a copy of BARK magazine.  Thumbing through it, I spotted the Border Collie pictured with your story ("Waking Up From My Dream Dog" - Bark Jun/Aug 12).  So, I began to read it being the Border Collie person that I am.  Well, I couldn't believe what I was reading.  It was as if I had written it!  You were talking about my Tucker.  We rescued him at 8 months old.  He had been abused as a small puppy and had been through at least two foster homes.  I failed to mention that we adopted him because we lost our beloved 14 year old BC Abby 3 months earlier and couldn't get past the grief.  It just felt right taking in this poor little guy that given such a difficult puppyhood.

We had Tuck for a couple of months when, as you put it, the Cujo came out.  It seems that once he became comfortable with his new surroundings and owners, he completely changed.  We have worked with a couple of trainers and looked for any assistance we could find.  We also at one point considered sending him back to the rescue, but just couldn't do that to him, and ourselves.  He has no tolerance for other dogs (even though he lived with them in his foster homes), children, trucks and strangers until he gets to know them.  Well, like yourself, we have adjusted our lives to him.   He is the sweetest, loving, playful little guy with us but still has those issues that we continue to work on.

I still can't believe that I am writing this to you, but I felt such a strong bond with you after reading the story that I felt I had need to thank you for letting me know that we aren't the only BC parents out there with this issue.

Please give Ainsley a scratch behind the ears from us!

News: Karen B. London
Pit Bull Chihuahua Cross
Unusual pairings happen

When I said that she looked like a Pit Bull Chihuahua cross, I didn’t really think that’s what she was.  Though our whole family thought that’s what she looked like when she showed up in our driveway, we also thought that such a mating was unlikely.

It didn’t matter much to us—we just enjoyed her for who she was—a delightful dog who was energetic, expressive, friendly, bouncy, and very licky. None of us cared that much about her heritage, but it’s always fun to guess what breeds are in a dog.

When we did ask her guardian if he knew what kind of dog she was, he replied. “You’re probably not going to believe this, but she’s a Pit Bull and Chihuahua.” They had neighbors who each bred one of the breeds, and she was from an accidental litter. (The Pit Bull was the female in case you were curious.)

Do you know of any particularly unexpected crosses, whether they were a result of a “whoops” litter or not?

News: JoAnna Lou
Custody Over Abandoned Pup
Hiker wants dog back after leaving her behind to die

Earlier this month, Scott and Amanda Washburn were in Colorado hiking 13,500 feet above sea level when they found an injured German Shepherd. They tried to coax the poor pup out of the nook she was in, but her paws were completely raw and she was too weak to move. Unfortunately the injured dog weighed 100 pounds and was too heavy to carry down the mountain. So the Washburns used their first aid kit to patch up as many wounds as they could and left the dog with water until they could return.

Forest Rangers are only able to send out search parties for people, so the couple turned to the internet to find help. Two days later, Scott and eight volunteers returned to Mount Bierstadt and began a 9-hour rescue mission that included hiking through a full-blown snowstorm. Fortunately they got to the German Shepherd just in time. The bandaged wounds had reopened and there was blood all over nearby rocks.

Dubbed “the miracle dog of the century” by her veterinarian, the lucky pup is going to make a full recovery. Scott and Amanda were so enamored that they decided to adopt the brave German Shepherd.

But believe it or not, the Washburns are now involved in a custody battle with the man who abandoned the dog on the mountain.

Turns out the pup’s name is Missy and she was left behind by Anthony Ortolani when a storm hit the mountain. Three days later, Anthony assumed Missy died and made no attempt to rescue her.

This story makes me so upset on so many levels (besides the part about the amazing rescuers). First off, no one should bring their dog hiking on a 14,000+ foot mountain unless they’re sure that their pup is accustomed to the terrain. Second, anyone hiking long distances should monitor their pup carefully for signs of pad wear or other injuries. Missy’s paws should never have gotten that raw.

That being said, I understand these things can creep up to the best of us.  But not going back up the mountain? Unacceptable.

The Sherrif’s Office says that the custody decision could take months and, for now, Missy remains at the veterinarian. I hope that Missy doesn’t stay in limbo for too long and that her rescuers are able to give her a permanent loving home. 

News: Guest Posts
Dogs Rescued During Hurricane Isaac
Seven years ago, only people were allowed in rescue boats
hurricane isaac katrina louisiana gulf coast dog rescue emergency plan

 

I cried today for three reasons. It is the seven-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. New Orleans is again getting battered by another hurricane, Isaac. And for the first time, I saw rescuers take people's pets into the boat with them.

 

This dramatic rescue video shows 70-year-old Fred Leslie and his four dogs being pulled out through a vent in the attic of his two-story home. He will never have to wonder what happened to his dogs, whether they drowned, starved or were rescued but difficult to trace.

 

After Katrina, many dog lovers took in abandoned dogs. Sadly, they assumed the worst about their owners. I got into many an Internet and group email battle with these well-intentioned yet ignorant folks.

 

If this had happened to Leslie seven years ago, his dogs would not have been allowed in the boat with him. You can be sure the rescuers would not have allowed him to stay, either. He would not have been given a choice.

 

 

News: Editors
Husky Howls
Husky Puppy Practices His Howl

The other day a panda-loving friend shared this link with me of the San Diego’s newest panda baby. Besides being incredibly adorable, it does make one wonder how the panda evolved its distinctive circled-eyed appearance, and then I saw this video of a Husky pup learning to howl and found the resemblance sweetly surprising.

News: Editors
Shocking a Dog Person
Rep. Jackie Speier calls for an investigation

Rep Jackie Speier (D-Calif) did something today that deserves a Bark call-out for a job well-done. It was reported in the SF Chronicle that she “ripped” into the National Park Service for using a Taser on a man who was running with his small dogs off-leash. When he was confronted by a ranger about the leash policy (which had been newly created in that area), he, allegedly, was uncooperative and would not provide her with his name. This happened back in January in a park within the Golden Gate Recreation Area in Northern California. When the man refused to give the ranger his information, she Tasered him in his back and arrested him! Speier noted that “Many of my constituents are understandably angered by what appears to be an excessive use of force by a park ranger.” She added, “From the information I have to date, it does not appear that the use of a taser was warranted.” Speier also requested information about training in taser usage for park rangers, including the appropriate utilization and risks of tasers. She also asked how the public was informed about dog policy changes at Rancho Corral de Tierra which now require all dogs to be leashed.

Speier suggested the appointment of an independent investigator to evaluate whether park regulations were violated and excessive force was utilized in the January 29 incident. You can read more about this. We certainly think the ranger used excessive force, do you agree?

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