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Mutts Comics "Shelter Stories" Series Feb 6
Mesilla's Story

Fans of MUTTS comics eagerly look forward to cartoonist Patrick McDonnell's annual "Shelter Stories." For his latest installment, the week's worth of strips were inspired by his visits to New York City’s only public, open-admissions animal shelter—Animal Care Centers of NYC. McDonnell is a longtime supporter of humane causes and looks forward each year to creating tales that move people to support their local shelters. Today’s comic Mesilla's shelter experience.

Patrick McDonnell was filmed during his time at ACC and will be featured in the national PBS series, Shelter Me. The Shelter Me TV series was created by filmmaker Steven Latham and episode six with McDonnell, “Shelter Me: Hearts and Paws,” will air in May.

Reissued online by special permission of King Features Syndicate.

News: JoAnna Lou
Cop Investigates and Leaves with a New Puppy
A Florida police officer adopts a dog after responding to a call at a local shelter.
There have been many altercations between dogs and police officers in the news lately, but not all of them are negative. Last month Officer Marcus Montgomery, of the Fort Walton Beach Police Department in Florida, responded to a routine call at the Panhandle Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) and ended up leaving with a new furry family member!

While conducting his investigation, Officer Montgomery spotted a puppy who had been abandoned the night before. He jokingly said, "don't bring him in here or else I will take him home right now." But before he knew it, he was holding the pup who proceeded to lick his nose. Officer Montgomery couldn't say no to the convincing puppy that he later named Kylo.

Kylo was left in a box behind the shelter overnight, during freezing cold weather. Now the lucky pup joins the Montgomery family's Pit Bull Terrier, Vader. Kylo also continues the tradition of Star Wars themed names.

Officer Montgomery hopes that Kylo's story will inspire others to visit their local animal shelters to give these abandoned dogs a new lease on life.

News: Karen B. London
Presidential Candidates and Their Dogs
How much do pets matter to voters?

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt famously said, “You can criticize, me, my wife and my family, but you can’t criticize my little dog.” His little dog was a Scottish Terrier named Fala, and what came to be known as the “Fala Speech” is thought to have helped him secure re-election for a fourth term. His defense of the dog did wonders for FDR’s image.

Lyndon B. Johnson’s image was also affected by his dogs. Pictures of him holding his Beagles, Him and Her, up by their ears upset many citizens. Though the resulting scandal may not have had major effects on his presidency, many people forever thought his treatment of his pets showed his true character, and not in a good way.

Warren Harding certainly treated his Airedale, Laddie Boy, with high esteem. Harding gave his dog a hand-carved chair to sit on during high-level meetings, like a true member of his cabinet. He also celebrated Laddie Boy’s birthday with a party at the White House that included the neighborhood dogs and a birthday cake made from dog biscuits.

Harry S Truman made a major PR mistake when he regifted a Cocker Spaniel he received for Christmas. He gave the dog, Feller, to the White House physician, though the dog became more popularly known as the Unwanted Dog. It’s ironic that Truman did not accept this gift, as he is considered the source of the quote, “You want a friend in Washington? Get a dog.”

Early on in our history, presidents may not have been concerned about how their dogs influenced people’s view of them. That could explain how President Washington was able to name his dogs Tipsy and Drunkard, for example. That surely would not fly in today’s political climate.

Today, we scrutinize everything about our politicians, including their dogs, and that extends to candidates as well. It’s important to know not just who will replace Obama, but who will follow in the footsteps of Bo and Sunny.

News: Editors
Mutts Comics "Shelter Stories" Series Feb 5
Sweetness' Story

Fans of MUTTS comics eagerly look forward to cartoonist Patrick McDonnell's annual "Shelter Stories." For his latest installment, the week's worth of strips were inspired by his visits to New York City’s only public, open-admissions animal shelter—Animal Care Centers of NYC. McDonnell is a longtime supporter of humane causes and looks forward each year to creating tales that move people to support their local shelters. Today’s comic shows Sweetness' adoption experience.

Patrick McDonnell was filmed during his time at ACC and will be featured in the national PBS series, Shelter Me. The Shelter Me TV series was created by filmmaker Steven Latham and episode six with McDonnell, “Shelter Me: Hearts and Paws,” will air in May.

Reissued online by special permission of King Features Syndicate

News: JoAnna Lou
Dog Escapes Kennel to Comfort Stray Puppies
The maternal instinct is strong in humans and canines.
Last month Karen London wrote about the importance of maternal care on puppies' development. Young dogs whose mothers interacted with with them a lot were more socially and physically engaged than those with less involved moms. Maternal instinct is clearly important for canines, and that extends to "adopted" puppies.

A stray dog in Canada had such strong maternal instincts that she broke out of her kennel to comfort a litter of puppies.

It all started at Barkers Pet Motel and Grooming in Alberta Canada which fosters many dogs while they wait to be adopted. Maggie, a dog whose own litter had already been adopted, heard another litter of abandoned puppies whimpering in the middle of their first night in the facility.

When motel owner Sandy Aldred checked the surveillance camera, she saw that Maggie had somehow broke out of her kennel and was laying in front of the puppies' enclosure.  So Sandy went to the kennel and let Maggie into the puppies' enclosure. The next morning, Maggie was still cuddled up with the puppies. Sandy's son, Alex, believes that Maggie needed the frightened puppies as much as they needed her.

The little ones are around ten weeks old and are still looking for homes through Alberta Animal Rescue Crew Society (AARCS).

According to AARCS worker Deanna Thompson, it's not the first time they've seen this instinct at play. They've even seen male dogs console crying puppies to make sure they feel safe.

Just another way we humans share similar qualities to canines.

News: Editors
Mutts Comics "Shelter Stories" Series Feb 4
Ralphy's Tale

Fans of MUTTS comics eagerly look forward to cartoonist Patrick McDonnell's annual "Shelter Stories." For his latest installment, the week's worth of strips were inspired by his visits to New York City’s only public, open-admissions animal shelter—Animal Care Centers of NYC. McDonnell is a longtime supporter of humane causes and looks forward each year to creating tales that move people to support their local shelters. Today’s comic shows lost dog Ralphy’s experience.

Patrick McDonnell was filmed during his time at ACC and will be featured in the national PBS series, Shelter Me. The Shelter Me TV series was created by filmmaker Steven Latham and episode six with McDonnell, “Shelter Me: Hearts and Paws,” will air in May.

Reissued online by special permission of King Features Syndicate.

News: Editors
Mutts Comics "Shelter Stories" Series Feb 3
Bes' Story

Fans of MUTTS comics eagerly look forward to cartoonist Patrick McDonnell's annual "Shelter Stories." For his latest installment, the week's worth of strips were inspired by his visits to New York City’s only public, open-admissions animal shelter—Animal Care Centers of NYC. McDonnell is a longtime supporter of humane causes and looks forward each year to creating tales that move people to support their local shelters. Today’s comic shows Bes the bunny's adoption experience.

Patrick McDonnell was filmed during his time at ACC and will be featured in the national PBS series, Shelter Me. The Shelter Me TV series was created by filmmaker Steven Latham and episode six with McDonnell, “Shelter Me: Hearts and Paws,” will air in May.

Reissued online by special permission of King Features Syndicate.

News: Karen B. London
Household Additions
A new dog can affect the behavior of other dogs

Maggie’s “Drop It” used to be perfect, making games of fetch effortless from the human side of things. However, today she was hesitant to let go of the tennis ball. Instead of putting it at my feet instantly, it look her anywhere from five to 30 seconds to release it, and sometimes she grabbed for it when she had just put it down. I wasn’t thrilled to see this change in her behavior, but neither was I surprised. A new puppy had just joined the family, and that can have all sorts of effects on other dogs’ behavior.

The decline in Maggie’s “Drop It” skill was the most obvious change. It interested me because the puppy showed no interest in the ball while Maggie was playing with it or at any other time, and Maggie was resistant to “Drop It” whether the puppy was present during the play session or not. I suspect this was not about having to compete with a new puppy for the ball, but rather about Maggie’s emotional reaction to sharing her home with another dog.

Just because the human members of a household are excited about a new addition to the family doesn’t mean that the dogs who already live there are on board. Changes can be upsetting, and dogs are often taken by surprise when a new dog appears . . . and then stays. Unlike people, they are not part of the decision-making process, and don’t have the benefit of knowing a dog is joining them and preparing themselves ahead of time. It can be hard to predict how a new dog will affect other dogs, but it seems there’s always something that changes when the family goes up a canine in number.

When a puppy is added to a family with a middle-aged or older dog, it’s my experience that two results are the most likely. One is that the older dog becomes more playful, lively and generally younger in outlook and behavior. The other result is the exact opposite—that the older dog becomes crankier and more sullen. It seem that sometimes a puppy breathes new life into an older dog, and sometimes a puppy makes an older dog seem a bit more geriatric when he wasn’t like that before.

Even when it isn’t so dramatic, there are often interesting changes in behavior by the dogs already in the household when a new dog joins. Over the years, I’ve observed dogs act a little differently when a new dog comes to stay. Besides becoming more possessive over toys and chews, I’ve seen dogs become more playful with people or less playful with people. I’ve noticed that some dogs bark much more, whether or not the new dog is prone to vocalizing. It’s common for a dog to become much more affectionate, and especially to be extra snuggly in bed or on the couch. Some dogs seem to go on high alert, and others eat much faster. Some become maternal (or paternal) either with the new dog or towards fleece toys. Some adjust their sleep patterns, and others choose different places to rest.

How did your dog’s behavior change when a new dog joined the family?

News: Editors
Mutts Comics "Shelter Stories" Series Feb 2
Wysteria's Tale

Fans of MUTTS comics eagerly look forward to cartoonist Patrick McDonnell's annual "Shelter Stories." For his latest installment, the week's worth of strips were inspired by his visits to New York City’s only public, open-admissions animal shelter—Animal Care Centers of NYC. McDonnell is a longtime supporter of humane causes and looks forward each year to creating tales that move people to support their local shelters. Today’s comic shows Wysteria’s shelter experience.

Patrick McDonnell was filmed during his time at ACC and will be featured in the national PBS series, Shelter Me. The Shelter Me TV series was created by filmmaker Steven Latham and episode six with McDonnell, “Shelter Me: Hearts and Paws,” will air in May.

Reissued online by special permission of King Features Syndicate.

News: JoAnna Lou
Dog Finishes Seventh in Half Marathon.
Runners in an Alabama race were surprised at their canine participant.
Runners in Alabama were starting the Elkmont Train Trek Half-Marathon when they were soon accompanied by a four legged participant. Ludivine, a two-year old Bloodhound, was outside for a bathroom break when she joined the runners at the start and followed the speedy participants to the finish line.

Not only did Ludivine, also known as Lu, complete the race, but she crossed the finish line seventh overall after about an hour and a half. The race organizers were so impressed that they awarded Lu a finishers medal.

April Hamlin was mortified at first to learn about Lu's adventure, worrying that she'd get in the way of the runners. But ultimately April was surprised to hear about her pup's athletic feat, saying she's "actually really lazy," but joked that Lu's debut had her inspired to be more active.

Although the race is officially 13.1 miles, racers that ran alongside Lu said that she ran even further, making her seventh place finish even more impressive. While the human participants stayed on the course, Lu greeted a dog sitting next to the road and visited a field with mules and cows.

Lu isn't the first dog to compete alongside humans to finish a half marathon. In 2011, Dozer, a three-year old Golden Doodle ran a half marathon in Maryland after escaping from his invisible fence. He finished in just over two hours, prompting Maryland Half Marathon co-founder Jon Sevel to promise he'd get Dozer his own bib number that said K9.

If Lu can turn around her lazy reputation, I think we can all find the inspiration to follow through on any fitness related New Year resolutions!

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