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Mutts Comics "Shelter Stories" Series Feb 1
Cindy’s Story

Fans of MUTTS comics eagerly look forward to cartoonist Patrick McDonnell's annual "Shelter Stories." For his latest installment, the week's worth of strips were inspired by his visits to New York City’s only public, open-admissions animal shelter—Animal Care Centers of NYC. McDonnell is a longtime supporter of humane causes and looks forward each year to creating tales that move people to support their local shelters. Today’s comic shows foster pup Cindy’s experience.

Patrick McDonnell was filmed during his time at ACC and will be featured in the national PBS series, Shelter Me. The Shelter Me TV series was created by filmmaker Steven Latham and episode six with McDonnell, “Shelter Me: Hearts and Paws,” will air in May.

Reissued online by special permission of King Features Syndicate

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Maternal Care of Puppies
It influences adult behavior

“Tell me about your mother.” This phrases, so common in therapy, all but assumes that whatever is going on with someone can be traced back to the mother. Was she a good mother—attentive, patient, nurturing? Was she less than stellar—harsh, uncaring, neglectful? Whatever she does, you can bet her offspring’s behavior will be considered a result of her actions, and that doesn’t just mean in people. It’s old news that maternal care affects primates and rodents, but a new study investigated the phenomenon in dogs.

The authors of “Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament” investigated the influence of the mothers on the behavior of adult dogs. Researchers looked at 22 litters of German Shepherd Dogs bred to become Military Working Dogs with the Swedish Armed Forces. The 94 puppies in the study were all continuously videotaped with their mothers during the first three weeks after birth. Videotapes were analyzed for many variables, such as the amount of time that the mother had her paws in the box with her puppies, time that she was in physical contact with at least one puppy, time she spent nursing, time she spent licking puppies, and the number of times she sniffed, poked or moved a puppy around using her nose. (Litter size was accounted for in the statistical analysis.)

When the puppies were 18-months old, they were evaluated with the Swedish Armed Forces’ standard temperament test. Dogs were assessed for their reactions to a number of situations, including social and cooperative ones with humans as well as potentially scary stimuli such as loud noises. Not surprisingly, the main result of the study is that researchers found an association between the mothers’ behavior and the behavior of her adult offspring.

Mothers were consistent over the course of the study regarding the time they spent interacting with their young.  The amount of interactions that mothers had with their puppies was a really important factor associated with the behavior of these individuals as adult dogs. Specifically, puppies whose mothers had a large number of interactions with them were more socially engaged with humans as adults, more physically engaged with them, and scored higher on tests for aggression. Based on the paper, it's not clear what is meant by "aggression" or whether the association with maternal care is a positive or a negative one. (It's also not clear whether "aggression" was considered a desirable trait for these working dogs.) Confidence of the adult dogs was the fourth category of behavior measured, but no association was found between confidence and level of maternal care.

There are many factors to consider when choosing which dogs to breed in any situation, including working dog programs. This study suggests that there are benefits to paying attention to maternal care behavior when choosing which females to breed. That is, more attentive mothers are an important piece of successfully breeding dogs with desirable traits, and females who are good mothers should be considered an asset to any breeding program.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
FBI Begins Tracking Animal Abuse
This year the National Incident-Based Reporting System will include data on animal cruelty crimes.
Earlier this month the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) began collecting data on animal cruelty crimes through their National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS). The hope is to prevent abuse and help flag violent offenders. This seems like a no brainer considering that studies have shown up to 70 percent of people convicted of violent crimes began their criminal history with acts of animal cruelty. Serial killers have also been closely linked to prior animal abuse.

In a partnership with the National Sheriffs' Association and the Animal Welfare Institute, animal cruelty crimes will now have their own organized category within the FBI's public collection of national crime statistics. The database includes information like age, criminal history, and location. Previously animal abuse fell into an "other crimes" category which includes minor offenses like spitting.

According to Mary Lou Randour at the Animal Welfare Institute, this change sends a strong message that animal abuse is an important issue.

NIBRS currently helps law enforcement track hot spots of burglary and gang violence, so now they'll be able to look for patterns of animal abuse as well. Animal rights organizations have also expressed that they'ill be able to better allocate their resources based on the new data.

Frankly this change should have been made a long time ago, but better late than never. The addition to the database adds to the growing trend in taking cruelty seriously through the the first state animal abuser registry and prosecuting pet related crimes as felonies. I hope to see even more developments in this area over the next few years.

 
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
EcoTraction
Pet safe way to prevent slipping on snow and ice

As so much of the eastern part of the United States is dealing with near record levels of snowfall, I celebrate for the kids who have snow days and sympathize with the people whose days (and backs) will be ruined by hours of shoveling. I also worry about the dogs who must deal with their playground (and bathroom) being covered in snow and ice. It’s bad enough to have to wade up to the belly or beyond to visit the potty. What’s even worse is the danger posed by many products that people put on their sidewalks to melt the snow or to provide traction in it.

Dogs’ paws can be injured by salt and many de-icing products, and ingesting them can be even more hazardous as so many are toxic. I don’t have a perfect solution, but I can say that there is a product I like because it is pet safe and does prevent slipping for dogs and humans alike. It’s called EcoTraction and may help you and your pet have a better winter experience. It is made out of a non-toxic volcanic material.

At the top of the list of good features of EcoTraction is that it is pet and child safe. Additionally, it does not damage lawns, it can be swept up and used again once the snow and ice melt, and a little of it goes a long way. I also like that it works instantly. The moment you put it on top of snow and ice, those surfaces are far less slippery and you can feel the traction under your shoes.

On the down side, just so you know, it does not actually melt the ice and snow—it just provides traction. If more snow falls and buries the EcoTraction, more of it needs to be applied. Also, if it is stuck to your shoes, it can scratch delicate floors, so shoe removal and a quick toweling of dogs’ paws is in order once you come inside.

I love getting out in the snow, and heaven knows that almost all dogs feel the same way. However, slipping on ice or having paws damaged by salt and snow melting products can ruin all the fun. I hope all the people in the snow zone are able to minimize the hassle and maximize the fun of this storm—for themselves and their dogs!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Helping Dogs Cope with Death
Left: Sheila & Willy Right: Willy mourns at Sheila's burial

A recent event reminded me of how different dogs cope with the death of an animal or person they are close to and how we can help them. Our local Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue where I’ve volunteered for many years had two rescued wolfdogs (commonly called wolf hybrids) and gave them a wonderful life at the sanctuary as part of the education display. The older wolfdog, Sheila, passed away recently of cancer and her companion Willy howled endlessly at her loss. The rescue does a fabulous job with the endless sick, injured and orphaned wildlife that pass through their doors and I was impressed with how they handled Willy's response to Sheila’s passing. Willy was allowed to see and spend time with Sheila’s body and was present for her burial. After investigating her body he seemed to be able to understand that she wasn’t coming back and he stopped howling for her.

I’ve always had multiple dogs and I allow my surviving dogs to spend time with the bodies of my other dogs when they pass. The dogs and I sit together with the body for a while and huddle close and grieve together in whatever way feels right in each case. In my experience, my remaining dogs have ranged between intense interest for some and barely a passing sniff for others. There is no right or wrong response and in each case I give them as much time as they want to be with the body. Usually after a few moments of close investigation, they seem to have all the information they need and move on to other things. In some cases it isn’t possible for the other pets to see the body and most will eventually find ways to cope as well.

I’ve also seen dogs after their human companions have passed. In one case I removed a small dog from the arms of the deceased owner. The person had died peacefully at home in bed and the dog stayed curled up against the owner. I was told that the little dog was normally very snappy and noisy with strangers but in this case she quietly allowed me to lift her from her person. She was likely subdued from the event but it may have been helpful for her to spend time with the body as well. Another dog I picked up had witnessed the murder of their person by another member of the household. That dog was one of the more traumatized dogs I’ve ever picked up, but he too eventually recovered in his loving new home.

Regardless of whether you are able or willing to allow your dog see the body of another pet or loved one, there are things you can do to help them cope. Dogs respond differently to loss just as people do so try to take your cues from your dog. I do think it’s ok to cry and grieve in front of your dog, but also do your best to reassure your dog and spend extra time doing things they enjoy. For some dogs extra exercise and playtime are helpful, while others may want more cuddle time. Dogs that really enjoy other dogs might enjoy a new canine friend if that’s feasible. Although many dogs grieve deeply, most are able to recover well with our love and support. 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Pet Amenities in City Apartments
Residential developments are increasingly catering to dog lovers.
Finding pet friendly apartments is a common challenge, but in recent years, upscale residential buildings are increasingly catering to dog lovers. Many buildings are adding amenities such as pet wash stations, play areas, and day care and grooming services.

According to research organization Urban Land Institute, these kinds of amenities first began cropping up in the early 2000s and took off more recently as the real estate industry recovered from the economic downturn. This was further fueled by millennials who are typically postponing marriage and kids, and adopting pets instead.

Dogs also represent a new revenue source for the real estate industry through pet fees, for just having your pup in the apartment, or membership fees, for the special amenities. Typically there's a monthly or annual cost for these services, which ranges from $250-$750 (the later including daily day care and dog walking). Daria Salusbury, senior vice president at The Related Companies, says that the pet amenities are an important way of showing residents that they understand their lifestyle. But there's obviously a significant financial incentive as well!

About a decade ago, her company first experimented with adding small, unstaffed grooming stations in a couple of its buildings. Now they've gone all out, with their comprehensive Dog City program, which offers in-building day care, training, and weekly visits from groomers and veterinarians. Since it's not easy to travel with dogs in New York via subway or taxi, this is a huge convenience.

Dog City's first branch, a 1,000 square foot space, opened five years ago in a New York City complex, featuring an outdoor terrace and bone-shaped pool. It was so popular, an expansion was immediately planned. Their newest Manhattan location will even offer boarding facilities.

Other developments, like the Gotham Organization's buildings, weren't ready to take the leap on permanent amenities. So they partnered with canine spa Spot Experience to negotiate discounts and arrange for a van that picks up canine residents to bring them to Spot.

While many New Yorkers are grateful just to find an apartment that welcomes their furry family members, buildings with these amenities make a big difference living in a city with so much concrete. These apartments also build a like-minded community that's fun to be a part of. I hope that the popularity of these amenities will cause a trickle down effect to non-luxury buildings as well!

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Secondhand Smoke and Pets
Study links health risks to dogs living in smoking environments.
The danger of cigarettes is well known, but people often overlook how secondhand smoke will effect our pets.

Professor Clare Knottenbelt at the University of Glasgow would like to change that by creating more awareness and understanding through her research. So far her team has shown a direct link between pets living in a smoking environment and a higher risk of health problems. Previous studies have shown a link to cancer risk, but the new research also uncovered a connection to weight gain in castrated dogs.

When the scientists examined the testicles of male dogs post-neutering, they found a gene that they believe acts as a marker of cell damage since it appears more often in dogs living in smoking homes versus non-smoking homes. In other studies, this gene has been shown to be altered in dogs with certain canine cancers. However, the effect on this gene was reduced when owners chose to smoke outside to reduce their pets' exposure. So this is a way for people to limit their pets' risk if they can't outright quit.

Interestingly, the researchers found that cats are even more affected by smoke than dogs. The hypothesis is that self-grooming may increase the amount of smoke ingested. Free access to the outdoors didn't significantly help reduce risk.

Clare's research is ongoing and is expected to be published later this year. However, I think the early findings, combined with what we already know about the effects of smoking, makes a compelling reason to quit smoking, or at least limit it as much as you can.

 
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Football Playoffs—All About the Dogs
Governors’ wager on NFL football game is personal

Football playoffs often involve trash talking and betting, but this year, there are dogs involved, so it’s obviously getting serious. In the NFC Championship game this Sunday, there’s a trip to the Super Bowl on the line for the Arizona Cardinals and the Carolina Panthers, but for the governors of Arizona and North Carolina, their dogs’ honor is at stake.

Governor Doug Ducey of Arizona and Governor Pat McCrory of North Carolina have made a friendly wager. If Arizona wins, McCrory’s Lab mix Moe will have to wear a Cardinals’ jersey. If Carolina wins, then Ducey’s Golden Retriever Woody will be sporting a Panther’s jersey. Luckily, these handsome dogs will look great in anything, so they are unlikely to suffer no matter what happens.

Either governor, on the other hand, would no doubt be distressed to see a beloved dog wearing the other team’s jersey. As close as we are to our dogs, it just feels wrong to have our dogs wearing enemy colors.

Ducey has tweeted, “AZ Cardinals, we can’t let Woody wear a Panthers jersey! Let’s get this done” and McCrory has said, I am confident that our Carolina Panthers are going to be victorious on Sunday, so that our beloved rescue dog Moe doesn’t have to suffer wearing a Cardinals jersey.”

I don’t care all that much about the game’s outcome. Yes, I live in Arizona, but I have family in North Carolina and I’m a Packers fan anyway. I’m just happy to see two governors expressing affection for their dogs.

News: Editors
Recognizing Shelter Heroes

Behind every rescued animal there stands a group of unsung heroes. Those people who make dog and cat adoptions possible — a team of shelter workers, trainers, foster parents and volunteers who shepherd each animal from their first day to, hopefully, a forever home. With dedication, hope, expertise and above all, hard work … they persevere, believing that every animal deserves a second chance at happiness and love. We salute their commitment, and strive to bring their stories to light.

The Bark has partnered with Halo to proudly present SHELTER HEROES — a program that recognizes outstanding individuals helping homeless animals find their forever homes. For the next several months, The Bark will be shining the spotlight on these shelter heroes, as well as publishing the best practices and recipes for successful animal adoptions. Together, we can make a difference.

Do You Know a Shelter Hero? Do you know an animal shelter worker or volunteer who stands out for their dedication, innovation and hard work? Somebody who is making a special impact in your community? We want to hear about them and tell their story to inspire others. We want to recognize their efforts and share their success. Go to our online entry and help us find the real shelter heroes in your community.

One special hero will be selected to be profiled in The Bark and the shelter they represent will be provided with 10,000 bowls of Halo dog food, courtesy of Freekibble.com. Other notable heroes will be featured on thebark.com. For rules and eligibility, click here.

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Fur Kid, Pet, Family Member, Best Friend, Dog
How do you refer to your canine companion?

The way that we refer to our associates says a lot about the relationship. Several decades ago, there was a very awkward period when many couples began to live together without being married, and boyfriend/girlfriend seemed inadequate. Partner and life partner became more common. The very cumbersome term coined by the United States Census Bureau “POSSLQ” (Person of Opposite Sex Sharing Living Quarters) never achieved widespread use. The change in relationships—serious and not married—gave rise to a number of new ways to refer to each other.

Now, I think we are in the middle of a similar period of trying out terms with our dogs as our view of human-canine relationship changes. We already switched the way we refer to ourselves in relation to our dogs. The antiquated term “master” is (thankfully) hardly ever seen, and owner is also less common. The terms guardian and pet parent seem to be on the rise.

The special canines in our lives have long been called “my dog” or “my best friend” but these are hardly the only options any more. I hear people refer to dogs as their fur kids, their four-legged kids, or just as their family members.

Personally, I lean towards saying “my dog” because I like the benefit of the simple description without the opportunity for unwanted connotation. To me, it seems that there is great love and respect in the term “dog,” as it is one of my very favorite species. I understand why many people prefer terms that more directly take note of the familial relationship, and I think there is great value in that. I also realize that many people consider the possessive “my” problematic with dogs as it suggests ownership, but I also say, “my sons” and “my husband” without suggesting that I own them.

How do you refer to the dogs in your life, and why? Has your terminology changed over time?

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