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News: Editors
Creative Fundraising for Dog Parks
From Grants and Partnerships to Innovative Revenue Streams

Dog parks or Off-Leash Areas (OLAs) area a great benefit to any community. The ability to exercise off-leash, in a designated and safe environment can contribute to the health and well-being of dogs in significant ways. Most dogs require the kind of exercise and movement that they just can’t get at the end of a leash. Off-leash, they are able to run, fetch and play to their heart’s content. When properly monitored, dog parks can act as a way for dogs to socialize in neutral territory. Whether learning to engage one-on-one, meet new dogs and people, share or play—well supervised interaction is invaluable to a dog’s socialization. Dog parks can be equally beneficial to the dog guardians and the community as a whole, acting as a social center for people who share common interests and concerns. People swap training and health advice, and compare tips on everything from dog-friendly destinations to vet recommendations. Dog parks are a hub of social and physical activity for both dogs and people.

Today, communities large and small are recognizing the value of a well-run dog park. Off-leash areas are springing up all over the country and are proving to be one of the most sought after park developments for city municipalities. The idea for The Bark was born in a dog park back in 1997, as a group of dog people worked with the city of Berkeley, CA to develop a 17-acre off-leash area at the site of a reclaimed garbage dump alongside the bay. Bark knows firsthand the many obstacles to securing an official off-leash area. We often hear from readers who are interested in starting their own OLA or working towards renovating/expanding existing facilities. Funding such projects is one of the biggest challenges but with an organized effort and imagination, there are some creative ways to raise the capital required. Here are some of our favorites:

Grants and Awards
There are some significant grants and prizes available for building and renovating dog parks. At the top of the list is an annual contest sponsored by PetSafe® which awards five monetary prizes to worthy projects—the top winner receives $100,000 and four runner-ups are awarded $25,000 each to fund their projects. The Nutro™ Room to Run™ program works to enhance existing dog parks with landscaping, signage, benches and agility equipment. The Stanton Foundation based in Cambridge, MA, provides grants to “take a community from start to finish on a dog recreational space”—all of their current participants appear to be based in Massachusetts. Community funding grants can also be found at Petsmart, Petco, Target and Walmart.

Memorials and Dedications
One of the country’s finest off-leash areas, Marymoor Park in King County, WA (near Seattle) helps support their 40-acre leash-free facility through their Pet Memorial Garden. The garden is dedicated to celebrating and honoring a living, lost, or deceased pet. The memorials include dedicating benches, trees and plantings, installing stones and pavers, and interring cremated animal remains in the celebration wall. Each remembrance option is paid by the donor, the money contributing to maintenance of the park. The Cosmos Dog Park in Gilbert, AZ, sold nearly 1,400 bricks for a special memorial wall over the course of six months. Public facilities from national parks to colleges have long utilized naming rights to fundraise for their programs. Tapping into the generosity of OLA users and dog lovers to honor their canine friendships through well-designed memorials seems a fitting way to support such a vital community resource.

Partnerships
Banding together with like-minded organizations to support and share facilities is a growing trend where resources and space are at a premium. A number of dog parks have added agility facilities to enhance their appeal and usage. This opens the door for funding and additional revenue streams for rental and events. Other municipalities share exercise and agility equipment with police and SAR teams who utilize the space for training their K9 partners. Dog parks in Provincetown, MA and Palm Springs, CA have tapped into local artists’ creations to enhance their grounds with art and architectural elements. Corporate sponsors such as West Paw Design have helped establish dog parks in Bozeman, MT, providing both their expertise and funding. One of the most unique partnerships is the one between the Historic Congressional Cemetery and the K9 Corps in Washington D.C. The non-profit association that oversees the cemetery has worked out a mutually beneficial arrangement with the K9 Corps—a group of dog owners who have helped safeguard the grounds by their long time presence and commitment. Today, the members of K9 Corps pay dues for the privilege of walking their dogs off-leash on the 35-acre cemetery grounds, and now contribute 20% of the Congressional Cemetery’s operating income.

News: Editors
A Boy and His Dog by Thomas Hart Benton
Auction of Classic Painting Benefits Dogs

The painting depicts a boy and his dog in a style that has become known as American Regionalism. It is signed “Benton” for Thomas Hart Benton, the movement’s greatest practitioner, best known for his murals embracing the populist idealism of pre-war America. On this painting’s reverse side is inscribed “For T.P.’s birthday/11 years old/From Dad.” The subjects are the artist’s son T.P. and Jake, the family dog.

Last evening (November 18) the painting was one of more than 500 works from the A. Alfred Taubman collection auctioned at Sotheby’s in New York. T.P. and Jake was painted in 1938 and was estimated to fetch between $1.5M and $2.5M. After a flurry of bidding, it sold for $3,130,000. It was accompanied by the following notes in the auction catalog that included touching words by the artist describing the deep bond shared by his young son and his dog. Appropriately, the sale of this painting benefited the Sam Simon Charitable Giving Foundation, dedicated to saving the lives of dogs.

The present work depicts the artist’s son T.P. Benton and his beloved dog, Jake. T.P. was eight years old when his mother, Rita, found Jake on a farm west of Kansas City, Missouri. The Bentons adopted him as their family pet and he became particularly devoted to T.P. When Jake died in 1946 Thomas Hart Benton wrote an obituary for the dog, which appeared in the Vineyard Gazette and The Kansas City Times. In one passage Benton recalls an event which illustrates Jake’s special affection for T.P.:

“After three years had passed Rita took T.P. to Italy to visit her mother. This was a sad time for Jake. Up to now he’s given me little attention. Rita fed him and T.P. played with him. Of what use I might be he had little need to consider. I was just there, good enough to shake hands with occasionally but not important. Now, however, he clung to me and I took him with me on a long roundabout tour of the South which ended, after seven weeks, at the docks in New York were we met the boat returning his real master and mistress.”

“There was a high rail fence between the passageway for debarking passengers and the people who had come to meet them. I stood by this fence trying to catch a glimpse of Rita and T.P. in the crowd of voyagers. But Jake beat me to it. The chain leash in my hand twisted suddenly and before I knew it Jake’s full grown seventy pounds of muscle and tawny hair was soaring over the fence.”

“No one who saw the meeting of the boy and dog could ever forget it. The travelers and those who met them stood aside to watch the play of Jake’s ecstasy. They forgot their own emotions in this more intense one of a devoted animal. His yaps of joy sailed up over the arching girders to the high roofs of the dock and came back to pierce your heart. This was the high point of life and those who saw recognized it.” (The Kansas City Times, p. vi).

News: Shirley Zindler
Fire Dogs Dillon and Molly

Two months ago I was part of a team that hauled supplies into Middletown during the tragic Valley fires in Northern California. We also evacuated a large number of animals during that time. Two elderly German Shepherds were part of that first evacuation. They reeked of smoke and were in terrible condition. I was told that their person was 92 and had barely made it out. She lost everything except the clothes on her back and her dogs. Sadly, there was no place for her to go where she could have the dogs with her. We transported the dogs to our county shelter for safekeeping as the Lake County shelter was full of other fire victims. They saw a vet and were treated for their various ailments. They had cushy beds and good food but still they sat in the shelter day after day.

Dillon, the black male, is around ten, in liver failure and has severe hip dysplasia, hair loss and allergies. Molly, the white female, is about 12, also has allergies, chronic ear infections and likely some arthritis. Both dogs are also somewhat incontinent but are still alert and cheerful with a good quality of life. These dogs, like so many other animals and people, had their lives turned upside down by the events and things may never return to normal.

I spent time with the old dogs whenever I could spare a moment from my other duties at the shelter. On the rare times when I was caught up on calls I would take them out to play together. They were normally kenneled separately due to kennel size and feeding issues so they loved it when they were able to be together. One of the times I had the dogs out was a beautiful warm day. They were filthy with bad skin and the stench of smoke still in their coats. I brushed out their mats, gave them sudsy warm medicated baths and towel dried them. We then went out and sat in late afternoon sun together, enjoying the last rays and each other’s company. I felt a bond with these old dogs and longed to help them. I was in touch with a relative of the owner and she said that the owner could not bear to surrender the dogs and wanted to be buried with them but was still unable to take them.

As time went by, the Lake County shelter had room again and the shepherds were transported back there. Still I couldn’t get them out of my mind. Finally I contacted the shelter and spoke to the director. Arrangements were made and a friend and I hit the road back to Lake County.  We picked up the dogs and brought them home. Dillon likely doesn’t have much time left and Molly may not have much more but these dear old souls are together again and sleep side by side on their cushy heated beds. They have a spacious yard to amble around in and people who love them. They have a family.

I love these two already and feel so blessed to know them. And when the time comes, I will hold them in my arms and kiss them good-bye. They will be cremated and buried with their original owner per her wishes. 

News: JoAnna Lou
Xylitol in Peanut Butter
More food products are including this ingredient that is toxic to dogs.
It's well known that chocolate is toxic to dogs, but not everyone is aware of xylitol. In an ongoing survey by Preventative Vet, over 50 percent of respondents weren't aware of xylitol or the danger it poses to dogs. In many cases, this sweetener can be even more toxic than chocolate (the picture above shows a dangerous amount of dark chocolate compared to the number of xylitol-containing sugar free gum pieces that could be deadly).

The ingredient is so toxic that symptoms can show up within 10 minutes of ingestion. This includes weakness, lethargy, loss of coordination, seizures, vomiting, and rapid breathing. Even small amounts can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia and liver failure. Fortunately dogs can recover if treated promptly.

Last year I wrote that xylitol was becoming more common in household products since it can reduce calorie intake. I always knew to be careful with sugar free gum, but the sweetener has been popping up in cookies, cough drops, toothpaste, cosmetics, and mouthwash.

To make things worse, I recently learned that xylitol is being included in some specialty brands of peanut butter. This is alarming because many people use peanut butter to fill Kongs or to make dog treats. Currently no major brand is affected, but this highlights the need to be vigilant in checking the ingredients on the products we use. It's important to note that xylitol can be listed on labels as sugar alcohols, which encompasses many different sugar alcohols, including xylitol.

Please spread the word so that we can make sure no dog is accidentally affected by xylitol poisoning!

News: Karen B. London
Professional Hockey Player and His Service Dog
Max Domi relies on Orion every day

“He’s made me a better person and a better hockey player.” That’s what rookie sensation Max Domi says about his two-year old diabetic-alert dog, Orion. Diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 12, Domi’s first question was, “Can I still play hockey?” The answer was yes but that doesn’t mean it was easy. It’s still a challenge, but Orion has made it easier and safer.

Like many diabetic-alert dogs, Orion is a Labrador Retriever who has been trained at the cost of tens of thousands of dollars. Orion was trained by Canine Hope for Diabetics to do his job, which is to detect odor changes that indicate a low blood sugar level and alert Domi. When Domi is awake, Orion alerts him by pulling at the bringsel (which looks like a small foam roller) that Domi wears at his waist. That’s the cue to Domi that he should check his blood sugar, which he does 15-20 times most days, but around a dozen times before, during, and after each game in addition to the rest of that day’s tests. When he is asleep and his blood sugar drops, Orion wakes him up by barking and jumping on him. If that doesn’t rouse Domi, then the dog will use his paws to wake him up with some well-placed contact to the face. Low sugar levels in his blood can be especially likely after a late-night game, so Orion’s tenacity about waking him up is especially critical at those times.

Domi had to go through a huge process to be considered for a service dog, and that included writing essays about why he was worthy of receiving such a dog, why he wanted one and what would do with him. He also had to meet several dogs so that the trainers could choose the dog they thought was the best match for Domi. For example, of the dogs under consideration, one was eliminated for not being as good in crowds, which is obviously not ideal for a professional athlete. I really enjoyed a recent video on ESPN that discusses what Orion does for Domi, and includes good footage of this adorable and hard-working dog.

Orion travels with Domi to all their games so he must be able to handle the air travel, the huge crowds, hotels, the ice rinks and the generally complex and crazy life of a professional hockey player. One challenge for anyone with a service dog is preventing other people from petting him or otherwise distracting him while he is working. All the other players along with coaches and other staff of the Arizona Coyotes know that they cannot interact with Orion when he is working. When he is off duty, though, he is just as friendly and loving as you might expect, and everybody cherishes the time they get to spend with Orion when he is not working.

Domi treasures all his time with Orion and is grateful for how much easier it makes it to concentrate on hockey. At only 20 years old, he’s arguably the best rookie in the NHL, so any fan of Domi or his team should appreciate that, too.

News: JoAnna Lou
Pit Bull Police Dog
Program trains rescued bull breeds to sniff out drugs and find missing people.
Today a rescue pup named Kiah (pronounced KY'-uh) graduated from an intense training program, making her one of just a few Pit Bull police dogs. Kiah certainly stands out from the typical Belgian Malinois and German Shepherds on the job.

Kiah will help the Poughkeepsie, New York Police Department detect drugs and track missing people. She'll also serve as a goodwill ambassador for her breed and for the police.

Kiah was given to the department at no cost thanks to a partnership between Animal Farm Foundation, a New York nonprofit that works to ensure equal treatment and opportunity for Pit Bulls, Universal K9, a company that trains law enforcement pups, and Austin Pets Alive, a Texas shelter. Normally trained police dogs can cost as much as $15,000, but this program identifies and trains rescued Pit Bulls to serve as detection dogs for police across the country at no cost to law enforcement. They've placed seven detection dogs so far, including Kiak.

Officer Justin Bruzgul, Kiah's handler, says that the pup is high energy and affectionate, and that they had an instant bond. "I couldn't ask for a better partner."

After Kiah arrived from Texas, her training was finished by George Carlson, the Ulster County, New York sheriff's deputy. He says there's little connection between a dog's breed and their aptitude for police work. The most important factors are the pup's drive, energy, and eagerness to please. George believes that Kiah is the only Pit Bull police dog on the East Coast.

This is such a cool partnership and I can't wait to see Kiah in action! Her journey can be followed on Facebook.

News: Karen B. London
When a Dog Holds Another Dog’s Leash
Many reasons for this behavior

Dogs often hold onto their own leashes with their mouths, and sometimes even take the leash of another dog. It’s generally pretty adorable, perhaps, in part because we relate to any example of dogs acting like us. If you watch any dogs hanging on to the leash of another dog, you may be able to make guesses about why the dog is doing it.

In some cases, as in the video below, it looks to me as though the dog is simply playing with the leash. The leash is an object in the environment that has caught the dog’s attention and interest, and the fact that it is attached to the collar of another dog does not seem to be important or highly relevant.

In other situations, such as in the following video, one dog appears to be walking the other dog around, much as humans do. It’s not a very forceful situation and no malice is apparent, but the dog with the leash in his mouth is using it to lead the other dog around. The dog on leash seems untroubled at first, but later appears to dislike the limitations imposed by the leash. Then, he starts to pull on the leash, just as dogs so often do when it’s a person holding it.

In this last clip, the more confident dog in the video appears to be using the leash to encourage (pull!) the more timid dog to go down the slide. Again, this is something that a person might do. Some dogs benefit from being forced in this way because they find the slide fun but might not have tried it on their own. Other dogs were scared to go down the slide before they did it and very scared while they do it, so it can be traumatic for them. It’s definitely a risk, but it sometimes works out well. I’ve seen a lot of people make their dogs go down a slide with this technique, but I’ve not seen a dog participate in this way before.

After watching the last two videos, it’s natural to wonder if dogs have learned how to guide dogs around by their leashes from watching humans do it. With so much recent research on social learning in dogs, I find myself watching dogs do things that humans have done and wondering if the dogs learned it by observing people.

Do you have a dog who leads another dog around with the leash?

News: Editors
Better with Pets Summit
A gathering of ideas

There is an astounding amount of research on dogs—academic studies, medical research, social and psychological testing, not to mention reams of data gathered from our everyday lives. Thoughtfully assimilated, all of this information can help us and our dogs live better lives together.

I was reminded of how fortunate dog enthusiasts are to share in this wealth of information upon my return last week from Purina’s Better with Pets Summit (November 3). The annual event, this year presented in Brooklyn, NY, was a gathering of pet experts sharing their latest findings with the media. The theme for the day was “exploring the best ideas for bringing people and pets closer together.” It was an apt description.

The day started out with an inspired presentation by Dr. Arleigh Reynolds, a veterinarian and research scientist who studies the impact of nutrition on performance on sled dogs. A champion musher himself, Reynolds’ talk focused not on a program he’s involved with in the Alaskan village of Huslia. This small coastal community was the home of George Attla, a famed champion musher and native Athabascan who ruled the sport for thirty years before retiring. In honor of his son Frank, who died at age 21 in 2010, Attla started the Frank Attla Youth and Sled Dog Care Mushing Program. The program serves many purposes—providing skills, lessons in cultural traditions, and a sense of belonging to the youth population while uniting all townspeople around a common activity, mushing. The program, as described warmly by Reynolds and in a short documentary film demonstrates the power that dogs can initiate in our lives.

Next up was a panel discussion titled “Are Millennials Changing Our Relationships with Cats?”—offering the interesting observation that a new generation of cat people have now formed a community on the internet—so as dog people connect at dog parks, cat lovers now interact online sharing their passion for felines. We met Christina Ha, the co-founder of Meow Parlour, New York’s first cat café. Can a canine café be in our future?

The most anticipated panel “Stress, Our Pets, and Us” featured animal behaviorist Ragen McGowan, PhD; architect Heather Lewis (Animal Arts) and Dr. Tony Buffington, professor of veterinary science. McGowan discussed the value of having dogs work for their food citing her studies with grizzlies, chickens and mice on the practice of contrafreeloading (working for food when food is freely available). Lewis’s architectural practice specializes in designing veterinary hospitals and animal care facilities around the country, meeting the unique needs of both workers and animals. It’s evident that good design can have an important impact on animal friendly environments—from soothing color palettes to calming lighting levels or the simple use of horizontal bars (less stress inducing) instead of traditional vertical bars. The key takeaway: Mental exercise for animals might be as important to their well-being as physical exercise.

“Raising Pets and Kids” featured Jayne Vitale of Mutt-i-grees Child Development Director; Ilana Resiner, veterinarian behaviorist; and Charley Bednarsh, Director of Children’s Services (Brooklyn). The Bark features an in-depth article in its Winter 2015 issue on Mutt-i-grees, a program developed by the North Shore Animal League that offers academic and emotional support to students from kindergarten through high school, teaching them how to be ambassadors for the humane treatment of animals. Bednarsh and her therapy dog Paz, team up to assist young witnesses of domestic violence navigate the judicial system (a similar program first reported in The Bark). We were reminded of the important contribution to the health and well-being of the children in these extraordinary programs, and also to common households. Note to self: Don’t humanize your dog—study, understand, embrace their dogness.

The afternoon offered a room full of experiential exhibits—interactive displays that provided lessons in healthy environments, cognition, reading your pet, nutrition and your pet’s purpose. Manned by teams of experts, the well designed displays presented an immersive course in Dog and Cat 101. I’d love to see the exhibits showcased to the general public, those most in need of education and guidance in the proper care of pet companions. The day was rich with ideas and notes that we’ll shape into future articles for The Bark.

Purina’s commitment to offering a forum of ideas is commendable. In a similar vein, the company hosted another notable event on November 7—a free live video cast of the Family Dog Project from Hungary—with over a dozen presentations by leading scientists and animal behaviorist exploring everything from canine cognition to sensory perception in dogs. Like the Pet Summit, it was a fascinating collection of concepts and dialogue, enriching to everybody who participated.

For more check out #BetterWithPets

News: JoAnna Lou
Online Dating Meets Petfinder
PawsLikeMe uses an algorithm to match people with adoptable pups.
One of the dogs available on PawsLikeMe.





















Petfinder, founded in the early days of the internet, revolutionized the rescue community by bringing homeless animals to the screens of thousands of people looking for their next pet (and I'm sure to another thousand who were "just browsing." Who hasn't poked around Petfinder just for fun?!). The web site allows prospective pet parents to search for available animals by location, breed, age, and gender. But what Petfinder doesn't do is filter by energy level or other personality characteristics.

Two women long involved in the rescue community, Elizabeth Holmes and Marianna Benko, and veterinarian Coleen Johnston wanted to create a web site that would put the emphasis on personality and lifestyle fit. Think of it as online dating meets the animal rescue world.

This year they launched PawsLikeMe, a web site that uses an algorithm to match people with available dogs in the area. Prospective adopters answer questions that takes into account what PawsLikeMe considers to be the four core personality traits that influence the human-canine bond: energy, focus, confidence, and independence.  

Anyone can list a dog for adoption on the web site, hopefully giving people a proactive alternative to dropping their pet at a shelter or kicking them out of their home. To keep people out that are looking to make a profit, 50 percent of the automatic $75 adoption fee goes to approved non-profit organizations with a validated 501c3 status or a veterinary clinic with a validated license to receive any adoption fees. The other 50 percent is kept by PawsLikeMe for the operation of the web site.

Shelters and other rescue organizations can also list pets on the web site. After I took the online quiz, I was matched to many available animals in my area, including dogs from the shelter where I adopted my Border Collie mix, Scuttle.

I love that this web site gets people thinking not only about a dog's cute photo, but about the personality and lifestyle fit in terms of energy level and other characteristics. However, I hope that users don't expect a perfect match (anyone who has used online dating knows that these web sites are far from that!). PawsLikeMe is a potentially powerful platform for getting more visibility for their homeless pets and I hope to see more people and rescue organizations use this web site!

News: Karen B. London
Breaking Up a Dog Fight is Risky
Just ask skier Lindsey Vonn

Lindsey Vonn has had many injuries over the years from skiing, but this past weekend, she joined the dog bite club. She was hospitalized after being bitten when she tried to separate her own dogs during a fight. True to form, she is back on the slopes and plans to race later this month even though the bite to her thumb required stitches and looked ghastly.

Vonn’s two dogs, Leo and Bear, got into it over a toy, and she tried to break it up. The gash on her thumb is both bad luck and a warning about the dangers of trying to break up a dog fight. Of course, when you see dogs at risk of hurting one another, it’s natural (and commendable) to want to step in and halt the madness as soon as possible, especially when they are both your dogs.

There is no surefire way to break up a fight between dogs, and there is no guarantee that it can be done safely. There are always risks, but some techniques are better bets than others, and depending on the seriousness of the fight, you may be willing to take a big risk. If you ever have the misfortune to see dogs fighting with each other, consider your options and choose what you think is the best way to handle the situation.

Some low risk options for breaking up a dog fight are not always that effective, but they aren’t likely to cause a problem, either. These include making a loud sound such banging any loud meal objects together, blowing an air horn or a sudden yelled, “Hey!” Often dogs ignore these attempts, but for dogs who are not that committed to the fight or who actually want to stop fighting, but can’t seem to break it off themselves, loud startling sounds can work.

It’s true that spraying dogs with a hose may stop a fight, but dogs so rarely fight within reach of one. Even spraying them with water or dumping a bucket of water over them can work, but many dogs don’t seem to care. I’ve heard of cases in which fighting dogs were pushed in a pool and stopped, but again, there’s not always a pool handy when you need one. Spraying dogs with a citronella spray can have the same effect as water.

Using a barrier to separate dogs is riskier than the above suggestions, but also more likely to work. Inserting a cookie sheet, a piece of plywood or even a thick piece of poster board between two dogs can break up a fight. That said, it’s a major feat of coordination to accomplish this in most cases during a highly active altercation. There is a risk of being bitten but the bigger the barrier, the lower the risk because you can keep your hands further away from the mouths of the dogs.

Separating the dogs with direct physical contact has the best chance of stopping the fight, but also poses the biggest risk of you being bitten. It’s wise to lower that probability any way that you can. If two people are there, an option is for each person to grab the back legs of a dog and pull them away from each other. Yes, it can work, and yes, it’s awkward to time this right. Dogs have almost no power when their back legs are not in contact with the ground, which is why this is not likely to lead to a bite to the people. Of course, a failed attempt in which one dog is being held and the other gets away can put everybody at risk. I’ve seen people separate dogs by grabbing tails instead of hind legs. It’s not very pleasant for the dogs, but is generally better than continuing to fight.

The worst and riskiest ways to separate dogs involve putting your hand near their front ends. That includes grabbing at collars and reaching for an object that is the source of the dispute. This so often leads to dogs turning and biting at people’s hands. That’s how Lindsey Vonn ended up in the hospital, but it’s only fair to point out that reaching into the middle of a dog fight is most people’s natural response to trying to stop it. Like any other guardian, Vonn didn’t want her dogs to get hurt, which means that she didn’t want them fighting. Though reaching in is risky, if a dog’s life appears to be in danger, it may be worth doing anyway. One sobering bit of advice I once got from a brilliant animal control officer was that if you absolutely have to use your hand to separate fighting dogs, use your non-dominant hand. That way, your good hand is not the one that gets injured. It’s fine advice that I hope nobody ever has to take.

Have you broken up a fight and been injured while doing so?

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