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News: Editors
Beyond the Myth:
A film about breed specific legislation

Beyond the Myth is a film about Pit Bulls that explores breed-specific legislation and how such laws are unfairly condemning thousands of dogs. It was made in 2011 but you can still host a screening in your area or purchase the DVD. See this movie trailer to learn more. This documentary was the brainchild of Libby Sherrill, as she notes, “I developed the concept as part of my senior project while attending graduate school at The University of Tennessee. After I received my M.S. in Communications, I left an eight-year career with Scripps Networks (HGTV) to produce Beyond The Myth.” You can read more about the myths surrounding Pit Bulls here.

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Dogs Don’t Live Long Enough
But we share their whole life

Though I could go on endlessly about the fine qualities of dogs, I could also babble for a little while about some of the drawbacks. I could do without cleaning up vomit, excessive shedding, and the tendency of the heaviest dogs to stand on my foot without even realizing they are doing it, but only the shortness of their lives really, truly bothers me. I have often said that not a single dog has ever lived long enough, and I stand by that statement.

So, at the risk of sounding a little over the top in a rose-colored glasses, accentuate-the-positive, glass-half-full kind of way, I thought about dogs’ short lives in a new way when I saw a set of paired pictures of animals recently. Every animal (mostly dogs with some cats and one turtle) is shown twice—then and now. Some of the pictures show the dogs with just a few months of separation while other photos were taken 16 or 17 years apart.

As I looked through these photos, it struck me as beautiful that we are able to share a dog’s whole life. That’s quite rare in people’s relationships, which is why those friendships that began in early childhood and last forever are so cherished. In contrast, many dogs come into our lives as puppies or adolescents and remain with us until the end of their lives. Granted, that end comes too soon as I am always saying, but there’s something special about sharing all the stages of their life with them from youth through middle age and into the golden years.

In the set of photos that inspired these thoughts about dogs’ lifespans, I especially love the second set of photos which shows a young man holding first a black puppy and later a 10-year old black dog. Even though the dog is large, he looks content to be held by this guy, and that’s not common. The brindle boxer puppy lying on top of the fawn boxer also charmed me. Even though just 3 months passed between the photos, the puppy has grown so much, and the older dog seems to have accepted the new addition to the household.

In all the photos, I love seeing the joy in most people’s faces as they pose with their pets months or even years apart. There are big changes in the dogs and sometimes, depending on the time difference and whether the first photo showed a child or an adult, big changes in the people, too. I adore how the behavior and expressions are often consistent over time, even taking into account the purposeful reposing that obviously happened and the inability of many dogs to fit into spaces that used to accommodate them easily.

Do you have photos that span your dog’s lifetime?

News: Guest Posts
App Review: Dog Decoder

Jill Breitner is a dog trainer with a mission: to make us aware of how dogs communicate by showing us how to “read” them. She developed her Dog Decoder app to do just that.

A helpful and handy primer on canine body language, it demonstrates the ways dogs let us know they’re scared, excited, cautious, willing and so forth. As Breitner explains, “If we understood what dogs try so hard to tell us, there would be fewer people bitten and fewer dogs ending up in shelters.” The app highlights 60 different poses/situations; each one (“butt sniff,” for example) comes with a helpful description that points out some common misconceptions, or the circumstances in which a dog will exhibit it.

A great tool for newbie dog people and those of us who need to brush up on dog talk. dogdecoder.com

News: Guest Posts
Home-Schooling for Dogs Could Be Catching On
“Do As I Do” scores high

A rambunctious five-year-old Labrador Retriever who until a few months ago knew not a word of any language, obeyed no command, charged around the house or zipped through any hole in the fence before one could utter the name he didn’t seem to recognize has become my 91-year-old mother’s great and constant companion. He sits or lies by her when she is sitting or lying down. He moves with her when she goes somewhere with her walker and when she tells him to give her clear passage. He accompanies her when she walks around the pool for exercise. She says, “He is a good boy.” My mother has never trained a dog. She had a nice trained dog once, but she had been trained by someone else and given to her.

But Rocky, as he was named by my mother’s granddaughter, received no formal instruction from any source. He was neutered, which helped slow him down, but more profoundly, he and she opted for companionship and accommodation over ignoring each other. She talks to him constantly, telling him what she wants him to do. If she praises him, she is not effusive. She may occasionally slip him some food when she is cooking, and he will if given a chance steal her breakfast bagel. There is no system to it, but there is consistency.Top of Form

More than a few dog trainers who follow behaviorist principles that require a stimulus, a reward or punishment, for learning to occur would argue that Rocky is untrained—that is that he still will not perform on command the actions demanded of him—except he comes when called. He moves when told. He tells my mother when someone is at the door and stands by her when she opens it, thereby providing at least the illusion of protection. If that is not training, what is it?

My friend and fellow Psychology Today blogger, Marc Bekoff (“Animal Emotions”), might call the process dog teaching or dog learning.

It might not be as quick or as systematic as one of the common schools of training, including those that use electric collars and choke chains and those that rely on clickers and food rewards or other positive re-enforcers. But then again the results might be quicker, deeper, and longer lasting.

I have seen no statistics on the numbers of dogs educated in this fashion, but I imagine it is substantial. Essentially it relies on the dog’s innate curiosity, desire to please, and recognized ability to imitate behavior and recognize words and emotions, traits which arguably thousands of years of living with humans have served to enhance. It also requires the human have an interest in being with the dog and interacting with him or her in a meaningful way—what used to be referred to as “quality time” with the hound. Praise and rewards are meted out more according to the person’s nature than any program or schedule. They do not have to involve food. Our Kelpie Katie was unmotivated by food—she would ignore food rewards—but when a tennis ball appeared she went on high alert. Even then the ball was not essential to her learning something.

This intuitive style of dog teaching is not without its intellectual underpinnings thanks initially to Edward Tolman in the first half of the last century. He proposed that learning had intrinsic value and that people and animals could learn in the absence of immediate rewards—latent learning it is called. That idea underpins what is called the social theory of learning, which also views learning as a social endeavor that can involve imitation of behavior that is demonstrated or verbally described.

In an article in the January 28, issue of Applied Animal (Behaviour Science, entitled “Should old dog trainers learn new tricks? The efficiency of the “Do as I do” method and the shaping/clicker training method to train dogs,” Claudia Fugazza and Ádám Miklósi of the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary, look at a canine system of social learning that relies on the dog’s great capacity for imitation called Do As I Do (DAID) compared with clicker training, which relies on the timely delivery of rewards to employ the dog’s associative abilities in shaping its behavior. (The article is only available by subscription, but here is the Abstract.) The clicker becomes a stand-in (secondary re-enforcer) for the actual re-enforcer, usually food. Clicker training is individualized instruction that requires the dog to figure out what earns rewards.

Fugazza, a graduate student in ethology developed Do As I Do in order to study social learning in dogs. To do that she had to develop protocols for teaching them. Judging from its success, it should gain a wide following. In this method, trainers, usually the dog’s primary human companion, use standard reward-based techniques to teach the dog to associate a small number of gestures with the command, “Do It!” The dog is then shown a new task and taught to perform it upon being given that command.

 

For this study, Fugazza and Miklósi compared the speed in learning three sets of tasks of increasing complexity, from knocking over a glass (simple) to opening or closing a locker or drawer (complex task) to a sequence of actions, like hopping on a chair and ringing a bell or opening a locker and removing a purse (compound). Objects were involved in each task that were not considered part of the family dog’s normal repertoire so that mastery of the task could be construed as learning. In the simple task there was no difference in performance between clicker-trained dogs and Do As I Do dogs, but that changed as the tasks became more difficult. Do As I Do dogs performed noticeably better, with more of them learning the task in the allotted fifteen minutes than clicker-trained dogs. 

No one knows how the dogs are making the connections, and in their conclusion Fugazza and Miklósi thought it more important to downplay that result in favor, Miklósi said in an email, of providing trainers with as many methods as possible so they can choose the one best suited to their needs.

That is a tactical decision rather than a scientific one. It is grounded in the recognition that, especially commercial dog trainers and trainers of working and service dogs, like to use what has worked for them in the past with the kind of dog on which it has worked. That is one reason punishment-based forms of dog training persist. 

For home schooling, time, patience, devotion—and a daily reminder of who has the big brain—are the keys to success and those come from discipline we often need more than the dog.

Used with permission of Mark Derr and Psychology Today, see more from Mark Derr’s blog “Dog’s Best Friend.”

Also see http://thebark.com/content/dogs-are-asked-just-do-it

 

 

 

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Divorce and Dogs
Great support or more pain?
Dogs influence the emotions in a divorce

“My best support came from my dog,” is a common sentiment among people who have been through a divorce. That’s no surprise given the well-known benefits of dogs. They ease feelings of loneliness, make us feel loved, encourage exercise, promote playfulness and facilitate social interactions. They don’t put pressure on us to cheer up, to get back out there or to stop dressing like a slob. They always seem glad to see us. There are countless ways that they make life better for people in any kind of emotional pain, including those whose marriages have ended.

On the other hand, if your ex gets custody of the dog, the agony of the split may be compounded. Not only is your spouse gone, but so is your dog. When I’ve talked to people who have not gotten custody and miss the dog, sometimes that pain seems more raw and intense than the loss of the human relationship. In some cases, that may be because the relationship with the dog is better and healthier than the marriage ever was, and sometimes the loss of the dog is the straw that broke the camel’s back. Either way, losing one’s dog adds to the pain of divorce.

It takes commitment to help a dog through the changes divorce brings. For some people, the focus on the dog is a helpful distraction, but for others, it’s just one more exhausting challenge. One friend of mine knew that her ex would be the best guardian for the dog because he works from home and runs with the dog every day. In contrast, she works long hours and travels a lot, and exercised the dog only on the weekends. To her credit, she did not fight for custody, although she does have visitation rights. She loves the dog, so in his interest, she agreed to a situation that she knew would be more painful to her, and it has been.

If you’ve gone through a divorce, how did your dog play into the pain and the process of healing?

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Susie's Senior Dogs Promotes Older Pups
The Facebook page focuses on finding homes for aging canines
Susie, the dog that started it all!

Brandon Stanton runs the quirky blog, Humans of New York, which features photos and stories of interesting New Yorkers. Despite his focus on people, Brandon has sparked a crusade to promote older homeless dogs. While out taking pictures, Brandon ran into a most interesting character--Susie a 13-year old Chihuahua mix that he calls “the greatest dog in New York.” Despite her age, Brandon fell in love and ended up adopting Susie. Brandon says that Susie “looks like a punk rocker, but acts like a nun.”

Older dogs have a hard time finding homes, even though they can be the perfect pet. Many times they're already housebroken, mellower in personality, and past the annoying puppy antics, like teething. Although young pups may win out on the adorable scale, nothing can beat the deep, loving look you get from staring into a senior dog's eyes. Combine that with the appreciation you get from a rescue pup and you have a winning combination!

Inspired by Susie, Brandon's girlfriend, Erin O'Sullivan, recently created Susie's Senior Dogs, a Facebook page dedicated to finding homes for aging pups. In just over a month, 20 dogs have been successfully placed. The first, 13-year old Nina, was adopted in two days! And the reach has been much farther than New York, with 10-year old Max adopted in Virginia Beach and 6-year old Rosco adopted in Oregon.

I hope that Susie's Senior Dogs sparks a movement across the country that helps highlight these often forgotten pups!

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Weight Reduction in Dogs
Recognizing the problem is the first step

The dog’s left legs were aimed a little bit skyward as he was lying on his right side. Excessive weight prevented them from being in the usual position—resting on the body with the feet on the ground. His guardian said that their veterinarian wants them to work on shedding some of that weight for health reasons, but that he thinks the dog’s size is just fine.

The problem of overweight dogs is certainly not new, but the trend towards lack of concern about dogs who are way too heavy continues to grow. Lately, many of the people I meet whose dogs seem far heavier than they need to be don’t seem to think that their dogs are overweight and need to lose weight. As a society, we seem to have become accustomed to dogs with a rounder shape, and overweight dogs no longer stand out because there are so many of them. Dogs at healthy weights may even look too skinny to people who are used to heftier dogs.

Recently, one woman proudly introduced me to her dogs, both of whom were significantly bigger than dogs who are at their perfect weight. As I began to pet them, she said to me, “Can you believe my vet thinks they are overweight?” Both of these dogs could probably have lost a quarter of their weight and still not been svelte, so yes, I could believe it.

It’s common for people to be advised to put their dogs on a weight reduction program, but many people decline to participate. Some of that may be because of the effort it takes to help out pets lose weight. The careful consideration of food type and amount as well as the attention to extra exercise make weight loss a big project. Another reason may be that people are just not convinced that their dogs needs to be any lighter.

Does your veterinarian’s view of your dog’s weight match with your own view of it?

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Family Lives Out of Car to Keep Dogs
Having a Pit Bull Makes Renting Challenging

Last week Shirley Zindler wrote about homeless people and their dogs, the hard life they lead and the difficult choices they have to make. It made me think of a family in Walnut Creek, California—Carol and Peter Devia and their two sons Leandro and Christoffer—who made the choice to live out of their car rather than give up their pups, Camilla and Rocco.

Last year Carol and Peter were fired from their jobs and evicted from their apartment. With their savings dwindling rapidly, they couldn't find a place to live with both of their dogs. While landlords had no problem with Camilla, a Labrador mix, they balked when they met Rocco, a Pit Bull.

Carol says that people keep advising her to give up Rocco, but that is something they could never do. They've had both dogs since they were puppies, with Rocco sleeping next to them every night.

Rocco wasn't always a saint, but from the beginning you can see that the Devias are completely committed to their dogs. After Rocco bit a Dachshund who stuck his nose in the family's yard, the Devias started taking Rocco to classes at BAD RAP, a Pit Bull advocacy organization, which transformed his behavior.

Finding affordable dog friendly housing can be difficult, but it's particularly challenging with a Bully breed. Pit Bulls are most likely to be turned away by landlords, which means they're often the first ones left behind at the animal shelter.

Donna Reynolds, the director of BAD RAP, says that the organization gets countless inquiries from people wanting to rehome their Pit Bull because they can't find housing. Donna advises families to ask friends help, post ads on Craigslist, and to seek help from rescue organizations. She also recommends getting an insurance policy on the dog, so any liability doesn't fall to the landlord, although that hasn't helped Rocco's case.

For now the Devias are making the best of their situation, cooking meals with a Crock-Pot that plugs into the car and driving to the local park to exercise the dogs. The good news is that Carol and Peter are now employed, so they're hopeful they'll be able to find housing soon.

Have you experienced breed discrimination when looking for a rental?

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Chihuahuas Overrun Ariz. Neighborhood
Packs of the pint sizes pups are chasing kids and overwhelming Animal Control

Recently Chihuahuas terrorizing an Arizona neighborhood have been making the news, in part because it sounds so unbelievable. Pit Bulls frequently get a bad reputation, but this situation shows that any dog can be dangerous, often due to human irresponsibility.

In the Phoenix, Ariz. neighborhood of Maryvale, Chihuahuas are reportedly traveling in groups of 10-15, chasing children, bicycles, and cars. Last year the Maricopa County Animal Care and Control received 6,000 calls about Chihuahuas from the Maryvale neighborhood alone. Animal Control has been urging residents to call if they see the strays and has offered to neuter any Chihuahua for free.

Abandoned Chihuahuas have long been a problem at California animal shelters as well. As a New Yorker, it can be hard to believe since small breeds are often the first to be adopted. But that's how Project Flying Chihuahua came about transporting the tiny pups by the plane load from the West to the East Coast.

Hearing about the Chihuahuas make me particularly sad because of how they were objectified as accessories in the early 2000's (influenced perhaps unintentionally by Paris Hilton and films like Legally Blonde). I hope that the Maricopa County Animal Care and Control's neuter efforts are successful, but responsible pet ownership is ultimately the root cause of the overpopulation problem. We must get the word out that animals are not disposable!

News: Editors
Treasure Hound

Have you heard about the couple in Northern California who were out walking their dog on their property and stumbled upon the greatest treasure of rare gold coins ever found in the U.S? It was buried in eight old tin cans, under an old tree. It’s a great story and evidence that dog walking is definitely worth its weight in gold. The coins, all 1,427 of them, date from 1847 to 1894, the height of the Gold Rush, and have initially been appraised at being worth $10 million. One $20 gold coin, minted in 1866 before the slogan “In God We Trust” appeared on coins, is so rare that by itself could fetch $1 million. The couple, and their pooch, wisely wish to remain anonymous and have lived in this rural area of California’s Gold Country for several years. They did say that this treasure means that now they can keep their property, the man adding, “Like a lot of people lately, we’ve had some financial trials, I feel extreme gratitude that we can keep our beloved property.” The couple also noted that they want to donate some of the proceeds to the homeless and hungry in their area.

What treasures or special finds has your dog sniffed out?

For more news on this story.

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