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News: Editors
Walking the Walk
Volunteering can make a difference
Brian Moss Photography

We often hear from people who are volunteering their time and talents helping animals. So many people are moved to action in the groundswell to help neglected and abused dogs—fostering rescues, transporting animals, quilting blankets, fundraising—the list goes on. It takes a village to meet the unfortunate demand, and too often, even that’s not enough. But it’s exciting when we’re contacted by somebody who has transformed their passion into action. A photographer named Brian Moss reached out to us recently, sharing some photos he took of dogs at a nearby animal shelter. The images are quite extraordinary. Brian has adopted strays, and is a longtime advocate for animal rescue. But in his words he “wasn’t walking the walk.” He’s part of a growing trend of professional photographers volunteering their considerable skills to shelters—capturing the heart and soul of adoptable animals for the world to see. These portraits can be lifesavers ... for the animals, and, in many ways, for the people who take them. See Brian’s photographs.

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Tolerating Petting Shows Patience
Eagerness to fetch is obvious

Sometimes when I think of what we ask of dogs, I find myself impressed with what they will tolerate. Recently, I was at our local park with my kids when a man came to play fetch with his Border Collie. This dog was clearly a devoted fetcher. Her gaze was locked and loaded on the ball even as they walked into the park, and her attention never wavered.

I watched the man and his dog play fetch for 30 minutes, and the dog never stopped staring at the ball. She did it when the man was holding it, when it was in the air, and when he set in on the ground for a moment while he tied his shoe. When he gave it a little toss in the air and caught it, the dog’s eyes followed its path. When he walked to the drinking fountain, her eyes followed the ball as his arm swung. This dog was riveted on the ball, the whole ball and nothing but the ball.

My kids know better than to ask to pet a dog who is so engaged in play, but I could see them looking at her longingly. The dog was left to play in peace until another family came and DID ask to pet the dog. The man said, “Sure, but she’ll probably be more interested in the ball than anything.” (Truer words were never spoken.)

The dog obediently dropped the ball and went into a down posture on cue so the kids could pet her, but her focus never left the ball. For several minutes, the kids fawned over her, and the dog stayed put the entire time while staring at the ball. She was polite and calm with the children, but absolutely uninterested in them. She continued to lie there watching the ball until the man said, “I think she’d like to play some more now,” and called her to him. She leapt up with extreme enthusiasm and resumed fetching with the same fervor as before.

This dog no more wanted to stop her fetch game for a petting session than I want to stop in the middle of a run to have someone braid my hair. Yet, she did what she was asked with admirable patience and grace. So many dogs are similarly tolerant and I’m grateful for that every day.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Police Officer Adopts Abused Dog
Cleveland pup is adopted by his rescuer.
  Last week Cleveland police officers responded to a call for a man beating a dog in the middle of the street. Upon arrival they found the Pit Bull mix with a witness who saw the abuse and convinced the man to stop. The injured pup was then brought to a nearby vet hospital to be treated for injuries on his face, legs, and paws, but not before one police officer made a special connection wtih the chocolate and white dog.

Patrol Officer Brandon Melbar ended up fostering the pup and has since decided to adopt the dog he named Harvard. Photos released on the Cleveland Police Department's Facebook page show that Harvard looks very happy in his new home. After reading so many negative news reports involving police officers and dogs, it's nice to come across a story like this one.

Through Harvard's ordeal, I also learned about Badges for Bullies, an Ohio based organization that fosters the relationships between police, the animal rescue community, and the general public. They paid for the costs of Harvard's treatment and follow-up care.

Badges for Bullies was created after a dog fighting raid where 27 scared and neglected dogs were rescued. Volunteers came together from all parts of the community to help the abused pups. The Cleveland Police held a fundraiser to pay for the dogs' treatments and that's where Badges for Bullies was born.

If the day comes where we finally overcome dog fighting, overpopulation, and other persistent animal welfare challenges, it will be through an initiative like Badges for Bullies that brings the community together to fight a common cause. I hope that the Badges for Bullies movement spreads to other cities and towns across the country!

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Out of Control Biting
Are some individuals incapable of self-control?

I specialize in working with dogs with aggression issues, so I think about biting behavior a lot. Mostly, I’m pondering ways to help dogs stop doing it and ways to help people who want to help their dogs stop doing it. Many thoughts center on protecting dogs from situations in which they are prone to biting, and protecting people and dogs from being bitten. Other topics include the motivation behind biting, the triggers that elicit it and the effects of a bite on everyone involved.

My biting obsession is always centered on dogs. I had given very little thought to biting by people until this week’s incident at the World Cup in the game between Uruguay and Italy. In that match, Luis Suárez of Uruguay bit (actually bit!) the shoulder of Italian player Giorgio Chiellini, who showed the tooth marks to the referee. The commentators seemed dismayed with remarks such as, “Oh dear, dear, dear,” and perhaps more alarmingly, “Surely not again.”

Yes, that’s right, this is not the first, but rather the third time that Suárez has bitten an opposing player. In the past, he has been suspended for a number of matches because of his behavior. It seems crazy to jeopardize his career and his reputation, embarrass himself and hurt the chances of his country succeeding at the World Cup by biting again. Television cameras are everywhere, and millions of people throughout the world are watching. There wasn’t a chance that another bite would go unnoticed or unpunished, and he has in fact been given the longest suspension in World Cup history and fined over $100,000. That’s why I think that Suárez is literally unable to stop this behavior because he lacks emotional control. (I’m not suggesting that he is not responsible for his behavior or that he should be treated leniently because he can’t control himself. I’m just saying that he seems unable to exercise normal inhibition of his own impulses.)

Biting is far more common in the canine world than in the human world, but it’s still rare to meet dogs who bite in such an uncontrollable way. I’ve known very few dogs like this, and though the behavior is unacceptable, I do find myself feeling pity for individuals—both dogs and people—who are unable to control themselves. It’s a shame to lack normal social skills and become dangerous to others or unwelcome in various situations as a result.

Emotions such as anger and frustration combined with high arousal are typically involved with dogs who bite in an out of control way. (Suárez has said that he was angry with Chiellini for hitting him in the eye during the game, and there’s no doubt that the intensity of a high stakes international soccer match lends itself to high arousal in the players.) Such bites happen when dogs have the canine equivalent of a toddler’s tantrum because they don’t get what they want. Dogs who bite in these contexts are literally unable to control themselves. It is much harder to substantially improve their behavior compared with other dogs, most of whom are biting as a result of fear.

Many humans go through a biting stage at around age 2, but they outgrow it. They learn self-control as well as developing an understanding of what is socially acceptable. Similarly, dogs use their mouths both playfully and not so playfully as puppies, but then the vast majority of them develop normal bite inhibition and an understanding of what they are and are not allowed to do with their mouths. Biting is a more normal part of canine behavior than of human behavior since people are more inclined to hit when behaving aggressively than to bite, so the analogy is not perfect, but there are similarities.

It’s important when working with an aggressive dog to understand as much as possible about why the dog is biting. There’s hope for the overwhelming majority of dogs with a bite history, as many are able to improve their behavior with a combination of behavior modification and a sensible management plan for prevention. However, there is the rare dog whose likelihood of improvement is small because of a lack of any kind of self-control and the tendency to bite when frustrated, angry and aroused.

Did anyone else see this incident and have their minds immediately go to thoughts of dog bites?

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Canine Retirement Home
Japan debuts long term care facility for pets
Japan has one of the highest average life expectancies and one of the largest pet populations in the world. So it probably comes as no surprise that the country is opening their first canine retirement home outside of Tokyo.

Although long term pet care facilities exist elsewhere in the world, Aeonpet, the company behind Japan's retirement home, is hoping to establish an industry standard and create the first chain with multiple locations. Aeonpet is already a fixture in the Japanese pet market with specialty stores, animal hospitals, and a luxury pet hotel.

Aeonpet's first location will care for up to 20 dogs at a time, charging about $1,000 per month. The price will vary based on dog breed and size. Amenities include an on-call veterinarian, a grooming "spa," a playground, and a swimming pool--enough to make any human jealous! Hotel rooms are also available for people to stay during their pup's last days.

Pet retirement homes play an important role in ensuring proper care as people get older or move into nursing homes that don't allow animals, but many people may not be able to afford the price tag. Aeonpet's facility comes at a good time for Japan, since they recently revised their Law on Welfare and Management of Animals. The updated legislation requires pet owners to take responsibility for their animals, either by taking care of the pets themselves or finding them a new home.

Making plans for the inevitable isn't fun, but I'm glad that pet retirement homes give us yet another option for how we can care for our pets if we are no longer able to do so.

Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Human Walking Program
Australian office workers rescued by dogs

We all know that many dogs are in need of rescue, but The Lost Dogs Home in Melbourne Australia took a different approach to enticing people to their facility. They started a program called the Human Walking Program, which offers relief to office workers who spend too much time indoors and sitting at their desks.

They offered people the opportunity to spend time over their lunch hour outdoors walking dogs. The promise of fresh air, a little exercise and time with a new canine buddy was very appealing. At the inaugural event in April 2014, over 5000 office workers were rescued from their daily grind and all of the available dogs were adopted.

Most of us realize that people need rescuing just like dogs do. The Human Walking Program turns that fact into happiness for members of both species. I’d love to see programs like this become popular in other countries.

News: Guest Posts
Dogs and Lipomas
Are all fatty tumors benign?

Expanding on the topic of tumors discussed last week, this blog is devoted to lipomas, aka fatty tumors. Of all the benign growths dogs develop as they age, lipomas are one of the most common. They arise from fat (lipid) cells and their favorite sites to set up housekeeping are the subcutaneous tissue (just beneath the skin surface) of axillary regions (armpits) and alongside the chest and abdomen. Every once in awhile lipomas develop internally within the chest or abdominal cavity. Rarely does a dog develop only one lipoma. They tend to grow in multiples and I’ve examined individual dogs with more lipomas than I could count.

Should lipomas be treated in some fashion? In the vast majority of cases, the answer is a definite, “No!” This is based on their benign, slow-growing nature. The only issue most create is purely cosmetic, which the dog could care less about!

There are a few exceptions to the general recommendation to let sleeping lipomas lie. A fatty tumor is deserving of more attention in the following situations:

1. A lipoma is steadily growing in an area where it could ultimately interfere with mobility. The armpit is the classic spot where this happens. The emphasis here is on the phrase, “steadily growing.” Even in one of these critical areas there is no reason to surgically remove a lipoma that remains quiescent with no discernible growth.

2. Sudden growth and/or change in appearance of a fatty tumor (or any mass for that matter) warrant reassessment by a veterinarian to determine the best course of action.

3. Every once in a great while, a fatty tumor turns out to be an infiltrative liposarcoma rather than a lipoma. These are the malignant black sheep of the fatty tumor family. Your veterinarian will be suspicious of an infiltrative liposarcoma if the fine needle aspirate cytology reveals fat cells, yet the tumor feels fixed to underlying tissues. (Lipomas are normally freely moveable.) Liposarcomas should be aggressively surgically removed and/or treated with radiation therapy.

4. Occasionally a lipoma grows to truly mammoth proportions. If ever you’ve looked at a dog and thought, “Wow, there’s a dog attached to that tumor!” chances are you were looking at a lipoma. Such massive tumors have the potential to cause the dog discomfort. They can also outgrow their blood supply, resulting in possible infection and drainage from the mass. The key is to catch on to the mass’s rapid growth so as to surgically remove it before it becomes enormous in size and far more difficult to remove.

How can one prevent canine lipomas from occurring? No one knows. Anecdotally speaking, it is thought that overweight dogs are more predisposed to developing fatty tumors. While I’m not so sure I buy this, I’m certainly in favor of keeping your dog at a healthy body weight.

Does your dog have a lipoma, or two or three?

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Police Officer Jumps in Lake to Save Pup
A dog is saved after his family's car ends up submerged
Last month Debra Titus accidentally drove her pickup truck into a lake near a retirement community in Carver, Mass. She was able to escape with one of her dogs, Stitch, but her Chihuahua, Moochie, was trapped in the submerged vehicle.

When the police arrived on the scene, Officer David Harriman knew there was only one thing to do when he learned Moochie was still under water. The police officer removed his holster and dove right into the murky water.

The conditions were so bad that Officer Harriman could barely see his hands in front of his face. But he was able to open the car door and save the poor pup. Moochie wasn't moving at first, but quickly regained consciousness after they got to dry land.

Officer Harriman didn't think twice about diving into the water, saying he was inspired by the love he has for his own 8-month old English Bulldog, Jax, who he considers to be a member of the family. Officer Harriman's colleagues describe him as an avid dog lover and we can certainly see why! 

News: Editors
Cartoonist Charles Barsotti Drew His Own Ending

Charles Barsotti, a cartoonist whose drawings were a staple of The New Yorker magazine for decades, died on June 16 at the age of 80. While his name may not be familiar to some, most readers will recognize his cartoons—simply drawn with uncommon wit—nearly fourteen hundred of them appeared in that magazine over the years. Many featured his trademark round-nosed dogs—lying on a psychiatrist couch, gathered around conference tables, appearing before judges in court. One shows a dog dressed in standard issue spy garb confessing “They rubbed my tummy, chief—I told them everything.” Barsotti’s cartoons were poignant and sweet, delivering a good deal more than laughs. The best had a short story quality about them.

The Bark interviewed Barsotti in 2007 upon the publication of a collection of his dog cartoons entitled, They Moved My Bowl, the conversation, like his art, was spare and humorous. We asked him about the book’s dedication “to the memory of Jiggs, the world’s greatest dog.” The cartoonist replied, “Any kid who doesn’t think his dog is the world’s greatest dog is weird. Jiggs was part Dachshund, part mystery meatloaf. Jiggs was run over and killed when I was 10. In my book, there’s a cartoon with St. Peter and a dog named Rex who is a stand-in for Jiggs.” It dawned on us that one of our favorite Barsotti cartoons was autobiographical. We ended our interview by asking him his idea of dog heaven … he replied “I’ll ask Jiggs when I get there and send word back.”

 

Read the full interview here.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Graduation Goes to the Dogs
19 pups become official bomb sniffers in New York City.
Service dogs have recently been honored in high school graduations and yearbooks, but last week a group of pups had their own graduation ceremony in New York City's Grand Central Terminal. The 19 bomb-sniffing German Shepherds went through an intense 12-week training program, making up the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's largest class to date.

Instead of a diploma, the each dog received an official badge with a collar and full color guard honors. Following graduation, the pups will patrol trains and station platforms by day and will live with their MTA and NYPD handlers at night.

Adding to the inspiring event, each of the dogs were named after New York fallen heroes whose families were in attendance. Their names are Augie, Chief, Daehan, Foxy, Geo, Holland, Joey, Mac, Patriot, Sentry, T.J., Vinny, Blue, Boomer, Dante, Falco, Nox, Sentinel and Tank.

Michael Stack said knowing that Chief, his dad's namesake, will be patrolling subways and fighting terrorism means a lot to his family. His father, FDNY Safety Battalion Chief Lawrence T. Stack, died while rescuing a man in the North Tower on September 11th.

The MTA's canine unit is one of the largest in the country and consists of 50 dogs that are trained to track the origin of thousands of unattended packages each year.

MTA Chief Michael Coan says the canine team is invaluable and also credits their success to the support of the handlers' families who take care of the pups when they're not on the job.

Having an official graduation ceremony is a great way to honor fallen heroes and the group of dogs waiting to carry on their legacy.

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