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Culture: DogPatch
Between a Dog and a Hard Place
Adventure athlete has her dog to thank for her rescue after a near-fatal fall.
Taz and Danelle Ballengee

When Danelle Ballengee headed out for an eight-mile trail run near Moab, Utah, last December (2006), it was supposed to be just another outing.

And that’s probably what her dog, Taz, thought, too.

A two-time world champion in the extreme sport of adventure racing, and a seven-time Ironman triathlon finisher, Ballengee lives in Dillon, Colo., and frequently uses Moab as a training ground. And lucky Taz—a big mixed breed— often gets to come along.“He loves to run with me,” says Ballengee, adding that she thinks Taz is part Australian Shepherd. “He really enjoys it.We’ll run for a couple hours sometimes.”

They were midway through what would have been about a 90-minute run when Ballengee slipped on a patch of black ice, slid down a steep rock face and across a series of ledges, and finally crashed to the ground some 80 feet below, shattering her pelvis.

As soon as Ballengee realized she wasn’t paralyzed, she started to crawl; it took her five hours to go about a quarter of a mile. Then, when the sun went down and the temperature dropped into the 20s, hypothermia became a very real threat. Ballengee drank water and ate her energy gels sparingly, but knew that if she closed her eyes, she’d fall asleep and might never wake up. Rather than giving in, Ballengee did subtle abdominal crunches, both to stay awake and to keep her body temperature from plummeting. She also took comfort in having Taz at her side.

“I wanted to curl up next to him and be closer, but I couldn’t move. But it still helped to have him there. I wasn’t really alone,” Ballengee says.

Ballengee has always loved dogs. When she was a child, her parents had an Australian Shepherd, a Springer Spaniel and, later, a Golden Retriever. She considered getting a dog when she graduated from college, but developing her career as a professional endurance athlete, race director and personal trainer took a lot of her time. When she wasn’t running, cycling, swimming or kayaking, she was planning for a race or traveling to an exotic location—New Zealand, Argentina, Italy, Switzerland, Hawaii or Fiji—to participate in one.

Still, she really yearned for canine companionship, and kept her antenna out for a good candidate. In 2003, in the middle of a busy summer, she drove two hours to a rescue facility north of Denver.“It was one of those places where you know you’re not going to leave without a puppy,” she recalls. It was love at first sight when she laid her eyes on a 10-week-old mutt, part of a litter that had been rescued from a Kansas farm.

During their first year together, Ballengee took Taz on short walks and trips to the lake. As he got bigger, they started running and hiking together, eventually covering as many as 15 miles at a time, and occasionally hiking to the summit of one of Colorado’s 14,000- foot mountains. So while the Moab trail she and Taz were running that day was rugged and remote, it wasn’t anything out of the ordinary for Ballengee. “She trains 20 to 30 hours a week by just going out and having fun in the mountains,” says Dave Mackey, an ultrarunner and adventure racer from Boulder,Colo.“It’s amazing, but that’s what she does. That’s who she is. She’s tough as nails.”

When the sun rose the morning after her fall, Ballengee’s optimism was renewed, but Taz was growing restless. He spent that day running off and returning, each trek seemingly longer than the last. When night again found the pair alone in the wild,Taz wouldn’t sleep next to Ballengee; instead, he lay about 15 feet away. “The whole time I was thinking, ‘I can’t die. I’m not ready to die,’” she says. “It scared me to even think about it, so I just kept fighting and telling myself I just had to stay awake.”

At about noon the next day—more than 48 hours after Ballengee and Taz began their fateful run—police found her pickup at the Amasa Back trailhead.As a search and rescue team assembled, a dog matching Taz’s description was spotted heading toward town.“We were going to try to identify the dog, but the dog basically didn’t want to be caught,” said Curt Brewer, chief deputy of the Grand County Sheriff ’s Office in Moab. “When the dog turned around and started running, we decided to follow it.”

By midday, Ballengee had become very lethargic. When Taz returned from his longest journey yet, he wagged his tail and gulped water from the small water hole on which Ballengee had come to rely. “I figured maybe he had a nice run and was just happy to be back. I gave him a little pat—and then I heard the sound of an engine. He knew that someone was coming… he knew before I did.”

The rescue team arrived and worked quickly, strapping Ballengee to a stretcher in preparation for being airlifted to a hospital in Grand Junction.“The dog took our rescue personnel right to her,” Brewer says. “I think we would have eventually found her because we were in the right location, but the dog saved us some time. And that was important, because if it had gotten dark, that would have complicated things. And it wound up snowing later that night, too.”

He spent that day running off and returning, each trek seemingly longer than the last. After surgery to repair her broken pelvis and an extensive rehabilitation, Ballengee made a full recovery. By late spring this year, she and Taz were once again trail-running, albeit a little more cautiously, and in May, Taz received the National Hero Dog Award from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Los Angeles.

“It’s pretty amazing, what he did,” Ballengee says.“We figured he must have run about 15 miles when he led the rescuers to me.He definitely helped save my life.”But it might have been a case of one good turn generating another: Taz was repaying Ballengee for rescuing him.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Eco-gear for Earth-loving dogs
Kit's Corner
baxterandbirdie.com, Dublin Dogs, Found My Animal, Katcha Bilek studio, krebsrec

Chic, Green and Giving
Making good on their green mission, Baxter & Birdie produces pet collars, leashes and accessories made only from factory scraps and overstocked fabrics. Each collar is laminated to resist rips, moisture and mud. Whenever possible, they’re even organic. If creating recycled dog gear weren’t enough, Baxter & Birdie runs the “Buy One, Feed One” campaign, feeding one shelter animal in need for a week with every purchase. (Cover dog Charlie is modeling B&B’s Suki in the Mar/May 2012 issue!)
$34.99
baxterandbirdie.com

Save a Bottle
The Dublin Dogs line of eco-conscious gear includes collars made from 1.5 recycled plastic water bottles and waterbased inks. Available in five bright and stylish collections—including Courage (proceeds from this line benefits Chase Away K9 Cancer).
$24–$28
dublindog.com

Adopted Dogs Only
The newest release from Found My Animal, an attractive orange leash, is designed in the “official” color for rescues; now you can give your adopted dog something all her own. Thirty percent of the proceeds from each leash purchase through the Found My Animal website goes to their dog-rescue support fund.
$42–$48
foundmyanimal.com/shop

Treads to Threads
Giving new meaning to the term “upcycle,” the artists at the Katcha Bilek studio in the UK have created waterproof dog collars made out of bike tires. Available in skinny, medium and wide, and in either slick and chunky tread, we’re fans of these because they clean up well and look sharp at the dog park.
$20
Katcha Bilek shop on etsy.com

New Leash on Life
The team at Krebs Recycle fashions leashes from durable, pre- and postconsumerrecycled nylon climbing rope. There are no carbon-intensive recycling processes to turn the rope into something else— they take the original rope and simply make it into a leash. Leashes are available in four sizes.
$12.95–$15.99
krebsrecycle.com

Culture: DogPatch
Dexterity Puzzles with Dogs
Diversions of Yesteryear
Trick Poodle, c.1920 (top). (Left to right) Rin Tin Tin, c.1960 USA; Dog c.1950

“A good puzzle should be simple in idea. H It should explain itself without any long instructions, and it should look attractive.” —Robert William Journet, 1927 R. Journet & Company

Dexterity puzzles—also known as palm puzzles, games of skill and handheld games—have been a source of fascination for adults and children since the nineteenth century. The simple hand-eye challenge of rolling a ball into a hole, or sliding, nudging and tilting a capsule through a maze, has proved to be among the most delightful, maddening and enduring diversions of the modern age despite, or perhaps because of, its sheer simplicity. Soon after the games became popular with the public in the late 1800s, they were produced in large numbers in the United States, England, France, Japan and Germany. The games, which often featured dogs on the face of the puzzle, could be found in doctors’ offices, train stations and the rainy-day game rooms of seaside resorts—in essence, anywhere that required waiting. They were even nicknamed “patience games.”

Trick Poodle, c.1920
Germany
In the 1920s, the University Theatres Concession Company of Chicago commissioned from Germany many different penny toys, which were sold with candy or given as a novelties in movie theatres.

Dog with Cigar, c.1910
Germany
Made of tin and glass, with a mirror on the back.

Culture: DogPatch
Finding Charlie
A stray joins The Bark’s family
Charlie A stray joins The Bark

As many of you know, losing Lenny, our 18-year-old Border Terrier mix who passed away late last year, was terribly hard for us. Although we have three wonderful female pups, I longed for a small, scruffy boy dog. I also knew that if we found one, he had to be able to successfully cohabitate with our girls. I wasn’t concerned about our Pointer, happy-go-lucky Lola, but the needs of Kit and Holly, a pair of scrappy but shy Beagle-mix sisters, had to be considered.

You won’t be surprised to hear that I spent an inordinate amount of time online, scouring Petfinder, Adopt-a-Pet, and rescue and humane sites. I also visited local shelters and attended adoption events. Strangely I could not find many dogs with the appearance and temperament I was looking for. There were more females than males, and a few of these had fear issues, especially men-centered. But then, a few days before Christmas, I did my usual search for “small, male, young, JRT” and was rewarded with this charming photo of a 15-pound, year-old pup named Boca.

By this point, I had extended my search nationwide, which was an education in itself. For example, I found that some rescuers didn’t approve of the fact that we already had three dogs. A woman in Texas told me that, while they could arrange an out-of-state adoption, they would not consider adopting a dog into a “pack,” even though we more than met the other criteria, including having a fenced-in yard and devoting oodles of time to walks and doggie adventures.

Luckily, Boca was being fostered in Auburn, Calif., only two hours away. I immediately emailed them with a flurry of questions and information about us, as well as the kind of life we could provide for him. Once again, I lucked out. Not only did I get a fast response, but I was the first to express an interest in him. He had been assessed in his foster home and did well with (hatless) men, other dogs — including Greyhounds — and cats. I broke the news about Lola, Holly and Kit; and got their ok for a visit.

Soon thereafter, Cameron, Lola and I drove north to meet him. He was being fostered by Shana Laursen of Greyhound Friends for Life at her remarkable, 1,000-acre facility, where she cares for both Greyhound and mixed-breed rescues. She had seen a photo of the little guy taken by Kern County Animal Control, who classified him as a stray, though whether or not he had been one was hard to know. Many shelters charge people a fee to surrender a dog, but no fee for bringing in a stray. This means that any history that could aid in placement is lost (definitely a policy that needs to be reconsidered).

Shana told us that this Bakersfield area shelter — which takes in an inordinate number of dogs and has one of the highest euthanasia rates in the state — is proactively transporting dogs to rescue groups in the San Francisco Bay Area, saving local rescuers a more than 12- hour round trip. Boca had only been in the shelter for about two weeks before grabbing Shana’s attention with his brindling and oh-too-sweet face. (She was fostering him in conjunction with another 501(c)(3), the Sacramento Independent Animal Rescuers Inc., which provides invaluable assistance to independent fosterers.)

By the time we met Boca, he had been with Shana for about three weeks, one of 47 dogs in her care. (Not only does she have lots of land and a truly amazing facility — with multiple buildings, and indoor and outdoor kenneling areas — she also has dedicated volunteers and a vet tech to call upon.) One look at Boca in all his high-jumping splendor told us that he was the dog for us. Once the papers were signed, we took him home.

Much to my great relief, when he met Lola, Kit and Holly there was no fuss whatsoever. It was as though they considered him to be a much younger, sprightlier Lenny. All was definitely right in their world — they were once again a pack of four.

As I write this, it’s been about six weeks since we adopted Boca — whom we renamed Charlie — and we still can’t believe how blessed we were to find him. (Read more about my observations of pack living)

Culture: Stories & Lit
Chasing Duque
Spirit Dog Leads to Hope in Costa Rica.
Patricia Artimana and two of the many dogs she shelters at Asociation Arca de No

In the year 2000, I lived in Costa Rica for six months and fell in love with the dogs. There were many visitors to the farm during my stay there, and everyone knew about me and my love for Duque, who, like most dogs in Central America, didn’t really belong to anyone.

Dogs don’t last long in Costa Rica, particularly in the countryside, where, even if they are owned, they are allowed to run free, down the unpaved winding rock roads and into the villages, where they hang out on corners waiting for food. In Ciudad Colón, at the one restaurant in town, they would wander in and sit in groups around each table, or, if I was there, climb directly into my lap.Duque lived at the top of the hill, on the farm where I stayed in a small apartment, and he joined me every day for an afternoon nap and then returned each evening to guard my door. Sometimes we would play tug of war with a sock and then race one another up the damp, mossy, tiled road to the very top of the mountain.When it was time to leave, I made plans to take Duque with me, but the airline refused to transport animals, so I left him behind with a group of villagers who had made it clear that they thought he belonged with them.

I knew he wouldn’t be there when I returned, and that probably had something to do with the length of time it took me to go back.

When I finally did return six years later, I promised myself that I wouldn’t expect to see him running up the tiled drive, or burying dog biscuits beneath the bamboo outside my door. And I knew not to ask after him with any of the locals who might still remember me—I knew not to ask, because I didn’t want to know and because I didn’t want to reveal to them that I was still thinking about a dog that I had only known for a few months, six years ago. A lifetime, in dog years.

Within a few hours of my return, the truth was revealed: He had been shot and killed. I had rehearsed for this moment often enough and managed to just nod, as though I had already known. I didn’t ask when it had happened, but assumed it was sufficiently long ago that the emotion of the events had receded into history for the people who lived there. For me, all of this information was new.

“He bit someone,” one person said. “No, he bit a dog,” another suggested.

Duque was intact and sometimes got into trouble pursuing the female dogs in town. But when I’d known him, he was fed, and people played with him. There was no telling what had happened to him after I was gone.

Grief and guilt are necessary but often useless emotions. That is, unless they can be channeled into something more. I had returned to Costa Rica to relax and to write, but once again, Duque was leading me somewhere unexpected.

Among many other changes, the farm was now wired for Internet access, so I sat in my bed and began googling: “Costa Rica dog shelter,” “Costa Rica animal welfare,” and so forth. I found two listings within my range: an organization called the McKee Foundation, and the story of a woman named Patricia Artimana, who was running an animal shelter just outside of Ciudad Colón, the Asociation Arca de Noé. Earlier in the year, the municipality had intervened when neighbors complained about the barking of the more than 100 dogs who lived on her property.

In the news story, which was now several months old, Patricia said that if she could not find homes for the dogs, she would set them free again before she allowed the government to do anything with them. In my short time back, I had already noticed that there were far fewer dogs roaming the village. Now, I understood why.

I emailed the McKee Project and arranged to meet Carla Ferraro, the project’s program director, at the Multiplaza, one of the biggest shopping centers in Central America. The last time I had been to the Multiplaza, I had watched from the bus as motorists swerved to avoid a bull strolling casually down the middle of the eight lanes.

The locals were used to it—stray livestock on the highway is fairly common. The bull turned and wandered into the parking lot. It was Christmas, and I amused myself by imagining that he was doing some last-minute holiday shopping.

“We don’t believe in sheltering animals,” Carla said as we shared a pastry. There are too many, she said, and too few places for them to find homes. You end up with overcrowded shelters, and the problem of strays continues in the streets. The philosophy is that the cost of longterm care would be better spent neutering the stray populations.

“But I heard that there is a shelter. Somewhere near Ciudad Colón?” I asked. She seemed cautious in answering this query. “Yes, I know the woman you are talking about.” She paged through a copy of Pets y Más, a bilingual animal care magazine that is distributed throughout the country. “Here she is,” she said, pointing to a story.“And here is her phone number. It might be interesting for you to visit. She uses the dog waste to make methane.”

I thought perhaps I was mishearing something, but chose not to question it.

Carla continued explaining the McKee Project’s mission: They had been training vets across the country to perform spayand- neuter surgeries using a tiny incision. The surgery can be done in as little as 10 minutes, allowing one vet to alter dozens of animals in a single day. The animals’ recovery time is quick as well. After providing this free training, the project then encourages the vets to offer the surgery for free in their villages on a designated day each month. The training is made possible through the support of the North Shore Animal League and Spay USA.

“Some vets were reluctant at first,”Carla said. “But then they found that people who had never brought their pets in for treatment before came back again for other services. So it was good for business.”

As I listened, I once again wondered if I was misunderstanding something. If it was possible to spay and neuter animals so quickly, why had I never heard of the process before? When my own Sula was spayed, it required overnight observation and cost an arm and a leg.Why wouldn’t this new procedure be just as valuable in the U.S.? But these were not questions Carla could answer for me.

“So, you spay and neuter and then put them back on the streets?”

“Yes,” she answered, aware that this idea would seem truly foreign to me. Part of the problem is the definition of “stray.” Studies suggest that only 5 percent of the Costa Rican dog population is truly stray; the rest, though they have feeders, owners and places to stay at night, run free throughout the day. Only 25 percent are sterilized, all of which was accomplished in just the past six years. As Carla noted, “If we can get to 70 percent of the population, then we will have the overpopulation under control.” Previously, the government’s solution was to poison animals in the street. McKee has worked to make that practice illegal.

Carla’s manner was sharp and efficient. She didn’t let her emotions get in the way, even when I finally told her what it was that had inspired me to contact her—the story of Duque and the way he was killed.

I first met patricia artimana in a small bakery across from the church in Ciudad Colón. It was raining outside, the typical evening deluge of the rainy season, and we were sitting with a typical view of the typical town square. She told me about the municipality intervening earlier in the year,when she had had more than 100 dogs.“I had too many,” she said, and I wondered if she really believed that, or was simply repeating what she had been told.

“How many do you have now?”I asked. She thought for a while and then made a number using the fingers on her hands. Eighteen.

In the morning, a cabbie friend of hers arrived to drive me to her home: a mountain called Piedras Negras. On a map, it seemed to be just outside of town, but maps don’t take into account the steep terrain and the winding roads.More than an hour later, we arrived at her house. I had no idea where we were. And, of course, I had fantasies of finding Duque frolicking among the other dogs when we arrived. I knew that this wouldn’t happen, but I couldn’t expel the image from my mind.

Just a dozen or so dogs appeared immediately at the gate, yet I could see there were more.Patricia eventually joined them and began to awkwardly balance her two tasks: managing the dogs and showing me around. The property was set up using a series of corrals, with different groups of dogs in each area; some were allowed to run completely free.

At the top of the property was a stall with several horses; an ox; a flock of geese; and a small, indigenous tree animal hibernating in his coop who wouldn’t come out to see me. In order to get to the house, I needed to enter the corral, but the dogs weren’t going to let me. At each gate, the dogs would gather, jumping and barking at me, anticipating my visit. Finally she pointed to another entrance.“Would you mind coming through here?” she asked.

It was a dog door, but it appeared to be the only door in which the dogs had no interest. I ducked down and crawled through.

On the kitchen table, three dogs sat, wagging their tails. They were not small dogs—each weighed at least 40 or 50 pounds. On the stove, two large pots of dog food were being slow-cooked over a gas flame. A plastic tube ran from the back of the stove through the wall and across part of the lawn, to a plastic fermentation tent. She was, indeed, turning the dog poop into gas for the stove.

“How many dogs do you have?” I asked. She thought about it again.“Fifty-five.” Patricia wiped down the table and pulled out a chair for me to sit on.Then she went to the stove to make coffee. I scanned the shelves of an open cupboard, lined with various medicines and treatments that I assumed were for the dogs.While the coffee brewed, she introduced me to more dogs. They each had names, but it was more than I could do to keep up with them. A small brown dog made her way through the pack to greet Patricia, then settled at her feet, looking up at her with stubborn longing.

“Oh, Julie,” Patricia said. “Poor Julie.” She turned to me. “This is a special dog. This is a dog that I found myself. I kept an eye on her. Brought her food. Eventually she let me take her home.” Julie climbed into Patricia’s lap, and stayed there as the other dogs voiced their disapproval. Eventually, Patricia put her down again with the rest of the dogs.

Patricia continued to introduce me to the dogs, and my fantasy that Duque would appear there, miraculously alive, continued to dwindle.As we walked onto a patio area, a huge, longhaired, rust-colored dog bounded toward me and rose on his back legs to butt his chest—his brisket—against mine. He came back to me several times during my visit.“He likes you,” Patricia said.“Maybe you can take him home.”

I thought about what Carla had said —that sheltering dogs was a waste of resources, that it simply displaced the problem, while few animals actually found homes.

“Will any of these dogs be adopted?” I asked. Patricia shook her head no.

“They are too old. We have others that are young dogs that can find homes. They don’t stay here.”

A fewdays after my visit to piedras Negras, as I stood waiting for the bus, I spotted a woman sitting on the opposite corner in front of the new aquarium shop, with several dogs in crates on display. Arca de Noé was having an adoption fair.

I crossed the street and bent down to greet an awkward, brindle-striped puppy. He looked just like my Brando had, six years earlier, when I spotted him in the BARC shelter in Brooklyn in the weeks after leaving Duque behind.

“I have one just like this,” I told the woman.

And two days later, I was home.

Culture: Readers Write
Show & Tell: Gavin
Cairn Terrier, Gavin

This is our Cairn Terrier, Gavin. Our rescue boy is a seven-year-old who was once afraid of everything and everyone. Now he’s parading with the Fort Collins Pipe Band, wearing a band uniform and smiling for the camera, with his pal Davey.

Culture: The Daily Show
John Oliver of The Daily Show Talks Dogs
Oliver & Hoagie

In 2012, we talk dogs with John Oliver, the British comedian who has been a writer and correspondent on Comedy Central’s multi-Emmy-winning program, “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.” Our interview with him appeared in our exclusive behind-the-scene coverage of the dogs who grace, enliven and patrol the show’s offices. Oliver tells us about the newest family member, a first for him.

BK: Tell us why you got your dog, Hoagie. Has she been good for you?

JO: I got her so I could have a piece of uncomplicated joy in my life. Yeah, it’s been fantastic; she really doesn’t give a shit about the “Daily Show” or working in an office, which I find enormously helpful at the end of the day.

BK: Your former colleague, Jim Margolis, told us the real reason you got her was to humanize yourself.

JO: Yeah, that’s true.

BK: Has she come to the office yet?

JO: She came here for one day; she’s a puppy and struggled to understand that this is not a dog run, but a place to work. I made her sit and give me a paw, and told her this is a place of work. I thought she surely would understand. She did the first two things but didn’t get the third one.

BK: How’s her training coming along, in general?

JO: She’s been great. The one thing she hasn’t been able to do is to be in a large office with other dogs at the moment. Maybe at some point, once she’s calmed down, she’ll join the rotation of dogs. But she got so excited, she just wanted to run around all the time, and I can’t cope with that when I have deadlines.

BK: How old is she now?

JO: She is nine months

BK: Well, you have a few more months of puppyhood. Goldens are puppies until they’re two, or even older. Is she your first dog?

JO: Yeah, my first ever. I had one pet before and that was a goldfish when I was seven years old.

BK: Is that why you got another Golden?

JO: Yeah, I never thought of that, but yeah.

BK: Has puppy-raising had any surprises for you?

JO: No, not really. My wife has been doing most of the work, so I can’t take credit for the way she’s progressing. But it is lot of work, and certainly a lot more rewarding.

BK: Do you baby talk to Hoagie?

JO: I talk to her as if she were a 45-year-old adult. She seems to enjoy that.

BK: Do you get your kicks watching the other Daily Show dogs do their thing?

JO: I don’t know what we would do without these dogs. There was one day when they weren’t allowed in the office because the then-president of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf, was the guest and we had to have bomb dogs sniffing around. You can really feel the difference when they aren’t here. It would be a very different place if there weren’t dogs walking around.

BK: Is that one of the reasons you signed up?

JO: That was instantly one of the best things. For the first time, it made me want to have a dog. So it probably contributed to me getting Hoagie in the long run.

BK: I thought Hoagie was a male name, but your pup is a girl.

JO: I don’t think Hoagie is a name at all. It’s a description of something, like a sandwich. I don’t think it’s masculine or feminine.

BK: How about Hoagy Carmichael? Ole Buttermilk Sky and all.

JO: Yeah, I wanted to name my dog after someone who was reportedly anti-Semitic! My wife loves hoagies.

BK: So, is she mostly with your wife?
Do you call home to find out what Hoagie’s up to?

JO: Yeah, I just spoke with my wife this morning. Hoagie was eating Reza Aslan’s most recent book, which is about, I believe, America’s war on terrorism; she’s very interested in that.

BK: Do you have a career path charted out for her?

JO: I would like her to eat a spectrum of different books, ingest information from different sources. Reza Aslan is great author, but there are others out there. Maybe she can start eating novels as well, moving into literature as well as nonfiction.

BK: Do you see her playing straight “woman” to you—can you imagine having her with you on interviews and in skits?

JO: No, I don’t think I would do that. The problem is, Jim is kinda right: she would fundamentally humanize me. So I can’t really do my job when she’s around. It would bring up too much compassion whenever she is around. I can’t have that. When I interview someone, I can’t have any kind of humanity inside of me.

BK: Did adding a dog make for a perfect family unit, or is it practice for having children one day?

JO: It’s been amazing, and nice, to come home after a stressful day at work and have someone just be there. Not that she isn’t interested in what I do for a living, she just can’t really comprehend it. So I can truly trust she isn’t interested in how my day was. She’s interested in going for a walk. I find that more relaxing than anything I have ever found as a way to de-stress. She doesn’t like the Daily Show because there are no dogs on the screen.

BK: Does she watch TV at all?

JO: She likes sports that are played on grass — she likes watching all that green. She is quite hypnotized by green. She thinks that the Daily Show should be on grass.

BK: Does she fetch?

JO: She calls it retrieving.

BK: How about tug-of-war; do you play it with her and let her win? That’s the important thing, you know.

JO: That’s something I need to work on. I’m a pretty sore loser. One of us is going to be disappointed.

BK: You have to let the dog win occasionally.

JO: Oh no no! I am working on that.

BK: When you’re stopped on the street, is it because of the show or the dog?

JO: The dog, especially when she was a puppy. People would come up to talk to her, then look at me and say, “I know you,” but then they’d look straight down at her and start talking again. I know exactly where I stand in that hierarchy.

Culture: The Daily Show
Wyatt Cenac of The Daily Show Talks Dogs
Parker licking Wyatt

BK: You’re a dog lover, right? You must appreciate having the dogs at the office.

WC: I like all dogs — I make friends with dogs on the street. Having dogs in the office is probably the best thing. I don’t have to wander the streets to make friends; I can do it from the comfort of my desk.

BK: What do you say to the dogs?

WC: When I’m in the office, I definitely know my voice changes when I talk to the dogs. I’m not talking baby talk, but even that it is interesting — to see a person who might have a really gruff exterior start talking to a dog, like, “Who’s my big boy?” There’s something about pets that brings that out in people. At the Daily Show, you have animals around to help you relax a little, reminders that you shouldn’t take life too seriously.

BK: Yes, others have mentioned how the dogs help relieve stress … how they cool it down a little.

WC: I think the dogs know it, too —they get a sense when people are a little bummed out. Jen’s dog, Parker, is really good about that; she’ll make her way toward you, wag her tail and start pawing at your chair and you think, Yeah! I’m going to take a few moments and just hang out with Parker. And forget anything that was bugging me a moment ago.

BK: Dogs sometimes make their way into your material, like your piece, “SeaWorld of Pain,” on PETA’s lawsuit to free killer whales.

WC: We were in no way saying that it is OK to abuse animals; if there’s animal abuse out there, we need to hear about it. I think in the conversation with the woman from PETA, she was asking humans to have empathy for the plight of killer whales, but doing it in a way that lacked empathy for some humans. It seemed like an odd double standard. [Editor’s note: PETA was equating the condition of captive killer whales with human slavery.]

BK: Is the Daily Show planning any canine political coverage?

WC: Maybe another dog political debate. A while ago, Anderson Cooper moderated a dog debate for us, and we used the office dogs. Some people thought it was real. What that showed me was that people really do want to see a dog political debate.

BK: There’s been a real surge in the popularity of small dogs; what do you think about this trend?

WC: I think that a lot of people are embracing dogs in general, and small dogs, too. In the south, you wanted a big dog to protect you, or to hunt with. I live in a New York apartment, and for me to have a 60-pound dog would be hard. But a little dog … I can put him in a little bag that doesn’t look like a purse and carry him and go where I have to go. It’s kind of weird, but I’ve seen more macho tough dudes with little dogs, and I think Oh, wow! If I met you 15 years ago, you would probably be saying “Why are you carrying that little dog?” A lot of it is economics. It would be interesting to match up the economy and the popular dog sizes. But the love a dog has to give doesn’t depend on the size of the dog — the size of the heart is the same. 

Culture: The Daily Show
Meet the Dogs of The Daily Show
Parker & Jen
Parker & Jen

Parker: Lab mix, seven years old
Jen Flanz: Co-Executive Producer
CK: What’s your favorite Parker-at-the-office story?
Jen: Parker knocks on the door of the post-mortem (the meeting to discuss the show we’ve just wrapped and prep for the following day)—she knocks and it sounds like a human. On several occasions, the person opening the door didn’t realize it was going to be her and were shocked to see a dog.
CK: Tips on a dog-friendly workplace?
Jen: I think it is amazing for morale, but you need to be clear with the owners that they are responsible for their dog; the dogs need to be housebroken and good with people. I also suggest letting people know during their initial interview that it is a dog-friendly office, in case they have a paralyzing fear of dogs.
CK: What does it mean to share your life with Parker?
Jen: I love it — she makes me smile every single day. I also love that all of my co-workers know and (most) love her. It makes it a little harder when you actually want to have a social life, since she pretty much goes everywhere with me. When I go out for dinner or something, she gives me that look … ugh!

Ally & Tim

Ally: Pointer mix, three-and-a-half years old
Tim Greenberg: Supervising Producer
CK: What is your favorite Ally-at-the-office story?
Tim: Ally gets very excited if we’re out on the street and run into any of the 100+ people who work here. It’s like she has a huge second family. She also has her own social life here. She’s often visiting her various friends throughout the building, crashing on the most comfortable couches, and she seems to meet an inordinate number of our celebrity guests. I only know any of this because people show me pictures later. She met Betty White and I found out about it when I saw the video on YouTube.
CK: Tips on a dog-friendly workplace?
Tim: Know that the dogs should be introduced carefully and gradually. Don’t want to mess up a good thing with a fight between dogs who’ve been pushed together too quickly.
CK: What does it mean to share your life with Ally?
Tim: They remind you to take joy in simple things. It’s great to have a permanent buddy. And given how gratifying it is to make them happy, it reminds you how rewarding it can be to take care of others (even the fur-less).
 

Kweli & Justin

Kweli: Golden Retriever, eight years old
Justin Chabot: Artistic Coordinator/DV Shooter
CK: What is your favorite Kweli-at-the-office story?
Justin: We had both only been here about a year, and one day, during Jon’s Q&A with the audience right before the taping, Kweli ran into the studio and directly to one audience member’s feet, then sniffed and sat down. Everyone behind the scenes (including me, of course) was freaking out, because this was a clear lapse in discipline on the part of both owner and dog. As I was going to get him, Jon asked the guy, “What, are your pants made of liverwurst?” and the guy replied, “No, but I do have one Snausage treat in my pocket. Can he have it?” This one tiny Snausage is apparently what caught Kweli’s attention from 70 feet away, through a couple of hallways behind the studio. To much applause, Kweli was awarded the object of his sensory desire.
CK: Tips on a dog-friendly workplace?
Justin: Do it! Your employees will work longer hours, be happier and amazingly, despite all the dog-petting and such, be more productive. I mean, with dogs here, we’ve won “Best Show” Emmys nine years straight. (Well-behaved, adorable dogs only, of course.)
CK: What does it mean to share your life with Kweli?
Justin: Ha! “Share my life” with Kweli? He is my life. Ask my girlfriend.

 

Dog's Life: Work of Dogs
Life Vest
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