Home
food & nutrition
Wellness: Recipes
Recipes for Dogs: Gluten-Free Amaranth Waffles
Tasty Snacks for Your Dog

Every dog deserves the occasional cookie, but some treats can trigger allergies or tummy trouble. Dog Cookies comes to the rescue with 30 easy-to-follow recipes for healthy, allergen-free treats—including vegetarian and gluten-free treats—so you can find the perfect cookie no matter your dog’s diet.

Ingredients
3 ½ Tbsp soft butter or margarine
1 free-range egg
2 cups amaranth flour
1 cup carrot juice
2 Tbsp hazelnuts (if your dog has a nut allergy, you could use rolled oats, millet flakes or spelt flake* instead)
1 Tbsp baking powder
A pre-heated waffle maker
Makes 5 waffles

Preparation
Place the butter in the food processor or hand mixer and beat vigorously until it is fluffy. Add the egg. Mix together the flour, nuts or rolled oats and the baking powder, and pour the carrot juice into the butter and egg mixture. Combine all of the ingredients. The dough should be a thick mixture which glides off the spoon. If it’s too solid, add more carrot juice; if too runny, add more amaranth flour. Spoon three tablespoons of dough into the waffle maker for each waffle.

Important: Always allow the waffles to cool before eating.

Treat tip
The butter and egg mixture will not really bind properly, but instead will “collect” together. This is because there’s no sugar in the dough. Once you add all the other ingredients, the mixture will bind together.

*Spelt flake contains gluten

Printed with permission of Veloce Publishing Ltd., publishers of Dog Cookies by Martina Schöps

Culture: Reviews
Bark Likes This: Pet Fairy Noshers
Organic Schmear Delights

Pet Fairy Noshers is another new product that Kit and all her doggy housemates, including old-guy Lenny, are simply gaga for. This tasty “schmear” is just right for hollow-toy and sterilized-bone stuffing (we’ve used it in the TreatToob, too). Ingredients include pumpkin, unsweetened applesauce, organic honey and cinnamon, plus other luscious goodies. Lovingly made in small batches in northern Vermont, this “barkalicious” spread also makes a wonderful gift. 16 oz. in a glass jar, $8 to $10. Amazon.com.

News: JoAnna Lou
Aussie Lab Weighs in at 187 Pounds
Rescued pup became obese from a junk food diet

At 187 pounds, Samson, a recently rescued Black Labrador in Australia, is easily the most obese dog in the country. Unsurprisingly, Samson is showing signs of high blood pressure, a common side effect of packing on the extra pounds. Making matters worse, Samson can't even safely exercise until he looses some weight.

Samson got to his current state because his previous family fed him a diet of burgers, pizza and other unhealthy foods. Fortunately, Samson was rescued by the Animal Aid shelter in Coldstream who immediately put him on a strict diet. They hope to get him to a healthy weight by the end of the year so he can be adopted.

Many people ask me if it's okay to feed their dogs human food and are ashamed to admit that they feed table scraps as treats. I always find it funny because I liberally feed leftovers as treats. In fact many human foods are healthier than commercial dog treats! Unfortunately, stories like Samson's give human food a bad reputation for pups.

Do you feed your dog human food?

News: JoAnna Lou
Canine Meals Straight From the Farm
NYC boasts the first CSA dog food

Chelsea Market is one of my favorite foodie places in Manhattan. New York City may seem like an unlikely place to get food fresh from the farm, but tourists and locals flock to Chelsea Market to find gourmet treats and wholesome food.

Now dogs can enjoy healthy food from Chelsea Market too.

Farm to Bowl is a collaboration between Stacy Alldredge, a certified canine nutritionist, and Jake Dick, owner of Dickson's Farmstand, a New York City butcher shop that works with small, sustainable farms that are committed to humane treatment of its animals.

As a canine nutrition consultant, Stacy has always advised her clients that preparing your own dog food is the best way to ensure a healthy diet made from good ingredients. Unfortunately, not everyone has the time to make their own food.

Farm to Bowl makes a wholesome, diet easy for everyone, although the price limits the customer base. Each package, which retails for $10, provides one meal for a 60-70 pound dog. So it would cost me approximately $300 to feed one of my dogs for a month. It's certainly more economical for the smaller dogs of Manhattan.

However, you certainly can't beat the convenience and fresh ingredients. Farm to Bowl is made each Saturday from locally sourced meat and seasonal fruits, and claims to be the first Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) dog diet.

News: JoAnna Lou
Commercial Diets for Senior Dogs Vary Widely
Tufts study finds difference in perception and reality

I’m a big believer in "you are what you eat," so you can understand why my dogs’ diet is really important to me. I definitely worry more about what I’m feeding my pups than about what I feed myself!

There’s so much in the canine nutrition world to navigate—raw food, home-cooked meals, kibble, just to name a few. And if you feed a commercial diet, do you choose a specialty formula geared towards puppies, seniors or large-breed dogs?

It seems that I’m not the only one with a certain amount of confusion on this topic. A study published this month by veterinary nutritionists at Tufts University found that the nutritional content of senior pet foods varies as widely as consumers’ perceptions about them.

Most respondents believed that senior dog foods contained less calories, fat, protein and sodium, but senior diets on the market vary widely in these areas. Additionally, about 43 percent of respondents fed their dogs a senior diet, but only one-third of those people did so on the advice of a veterinarian.

This disconnect could be potentially harmful, for instance, if a senior diet was chosen for a dog with heart disease based on the assumption that it had less sodium.

Currently, there are no AAFCO guidelines specifically for senior formulas. Given that there is such variation, it’s even more important to consult a veterinarian and to read labels closely to make sure you’re using the right diet for your dog.

News: Guest Posts
Jones Natural Chews Recall
Pig ears may be contaminated with Salmonella

Jones Natural Chews is recalling 2,705 boxes of pig ears because they are potentially contaminated with Salmonella bacteria. Find lots and labels and more information about risks and symptoms at the Food and Drug Administration’s website.

News: JoAnna Lou
Street Food Goes to the Dogs
L.A. gets its own gourmet treat truck for pets

Living in New York, I’m fortunate to have some of the best food in the country right at my doorstep. But despite the many top ranked restaurants, some of my favorite meals come on wheels. Gourmet food trucks have been popping up in cities all over the country, developing cult-like followings for their affordable delicacies.

Now pets in Los Angeles have their own food truck. PhyDough sells preservative-free dog treats made with organic, human-grade ingredients. They’ve also partnered with the Coolhaus Ice Cream Sandwich Truck for humans to make soy or yogurt-based ice cream for the pups.

PhyDough was founded by Patrick Guilfoyle, a self-proclaimed foodie who owns Double Dog Dare Ya, a boutique kennel in Burbank, Calif. Patrick’s five dogs, who serve as official taste testers, are particularly enthusiastic about his latest business venture.

What’s cool is PhyDough isn’t just a convenient option for buying healthy treats. The truck has become a place where dog lovers meet up and their pups socialize. Hopefully, this venture will catch up in other cities around the country!

 

News: Guest Posts
2007 Melamine Contamination Explained
FDA webinar to cover investigation, harmful effects

In 2007, thousands of dogs and cats were made ill and even killed by melamine contamination in imported pet food and treats. Questions, anger and grief still linger. On Tuesday, Food and Drug Administration scientist Renate Reimschuessel will detail the FDA’s investigation into the crisis and the contaminant’s harmful effects. During the half-hour limited-audience webinar, Reimschuessel will also respond to listeners’ questions.

  Details: Tuesday, Nov. 30 at 2 p.m. EST—complete details at the link above. (Note: There are a limited number of spots available but materials from the webinar will be made available on the FDA's website.) 

 

News: Guest Posts
Dog Food Recall
Blue Buffalo recalls chicken and salmon dog food

The Blue Buffalo Co. has announced a voluntary recall of specific production runs of its Wilderness Chicken-Dog, Basics Salmon-Dog and Large Breed Adult Dog products, “as we have reason to believe that the products from these runs may contain a higher level of Vitamin D than is called for in our product specifications.”

  According to the company, the potential of increased Vitamin D presents risk to a very small segment of the canine population who appear to be sensitive to higher levels of Vitamin D.    The ASPCA has advised pet owners who use Blue Buffalo products to contact the company with any questions related to its products and monitor their pets for signs of illness. Dr. Camille DeClementi, veterinarian and senior toxicologist at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center said, “Should pet owners notice symptoms such as increased thirst, urination, stomach upset or loss of appetite, they should consult their veterinarian or contact the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for help.”   According to ASPCA, excessive exposure to D can result in hypercalcemia is a serious illness that affects the electrolytes in the body and can disrupt normal organ function. Serious cases can result in acute renal failure and cause damage to the heart or central nervous system. Coma and death have occurred in untreated cases.   Blue Buffalo will reimburse any veterinary or testing expenses related to illness caused by these products. Visit the Blue Buffalo website for the affected product codes and to learn more about the circumstances of the recall.

 

News: Guest Posts
Salmonella Risk
Human infections linked to pet food
We’ve posted several recalls recently related to concerns about salmonella in dry dog food. Now, there’s an additional, disturbing wrinkle: The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that dozens of salmonella infections in toddlers have been traced to dry pet food. According to The New York Times report, it’s the first time human infections have been linked to this source.

  The CDC recommends “children younger than 5 not be allowed to touch or eat pet food or pet treats and be kept away from pet feeding areas.”

 

Pages