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News: Guest Posts
Better Than Liverwurst
Is dog food just pâté by another name?

“Tastes like dog food” may not be the insult you think. According to a story in the Los Angeles Times, only 3 of 18 human participants in a blind taste test were able to identify dog food from among samples of pâté, liverwurst, Spam and Newman’s Own dog food. While I think this says more about the competition than about dog food, the results highlight something we all suspect about taste—that it’s about much more than taste buds.

 

Personally, I’m happy about the results because I’m always a little freaked out by how much I want to snarf my dogs’ peanut butter and molasses cookies. Still the test leaves one question unanswered: Faced with the same selection, which do dogs prefer?

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
FDA Investigates Nutro Dog Food
Illnesses may be linked to food. UPDATED.

[Editor's Note: ConsumerAffairs.com has reported that the FDA is denying reports of an investigation into Nutro, contradicting individuals who say they have been contacted about Nutro by FDA investigators, as well as others in the FDA. We'll keep following this story. Meanwhile, readers have posted some interesting comments including an inside perspective from someone who claims to be a former employee.]

 

There has long been talk that Nutro Dog Food may be responsible for illnesses in many dogs, but the company has denied these claims and maintained that their food is safe. It may be some time before the truth is sorted out, but we do now know that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the company.

Food safety continues to be a huge issue for both people and our pets, and we must be cautious about everything we feed our dogs. It may be a long time before we know whether or not Nutro Dog Food is causing these problems, but the fact that an investigation is underway to determine the truth is a good thing.

News: Guest Posts
Consumer Reports Tackles (Not Really) Pet Food
Maybe a better source for insight on GPS collars and robot dogs

When I turn to Consumer Reports, it’s usually for the skinny on things with plugs and engines. Last time I subscribed online, I was in the market for a refrigerator. So I was surprised to see them shine their high beams  (only sorta) on pet food in the March '09 issue. The basic advice was sound: Ignore fancy packaging and unverified claims, read the labels, don’t assume the most expensive is best.

But some aspects of Q&A: Vets Weigh In on Fido’s Food nagged at me, especially the opening caveat: “All but one [of the veterinarians interviewed] have received some funding from the pet-food industry.” Give me Whole Dog Journal food reviews anytime.

I also felt a twinge when I read this advice: “Be careful when making your own pet food. Most experts said they hadn’t seen a pet get sick from inexpensive food; however, half said they had seen pets become ill from eating homemade pet food, a growing trend since the 2007 recall of some commercial pet food contaminated by melamine.” I’m not a nutrition expert but the suggestion that people can’t home-prepare food better than a giant extruding machine half-way around the world really sticks in my craw.

I was also disappointed by the lack of detailed help in interpreting ingredient lists. For example, there is no advice about avoiding meat by-products, processed grains or artificial preservatives. As much as I love CR, I'm disappointed they squandered this opportunity to reach a wide audience with sorely needed smarts.
 

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Peanut Butter Recall
Stop the spread of salmonella by taking stock of your pantry.

Now is the time to check the ingredients list of your dog's food and treats as the peanut butter recall has spread, so to speak. If you want to look up a particular item, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration has created an exhaustive database. Click on the "Pet Food" category for specific brands. If you're like me and treat your dogs to a dollop of peanut butter from time to time, it's worth looking through the list for any other brands that might be on your shelves.

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PetSmart Recalls Treats
Salmonella outbreak traced to a small peanut manufacturing plant could now affect dogs

Time to check your pantry again! The recent salmonella outbreak traced to a small peanut manufacturing plant could now affect dogs and their owners. PetsMart is recalling Grreat Choice dog biscuits because of a link to Peanut Corp. of America in Blakely, Ga. Animals are at less risk than people, especially kids, who handle the treats. However, if your dog acts lethargic or has bloody diarrhea, seek immediate veterinary care. For more info, read "Pet Treats Recalled in Salmonella Outbreak."

News: Guest Posts
Updated Pet Food Warnings
Peanut butter treats and chicken jerky on the list

Citing concerns over a salmonella outbreak associated with peanut butter, PetSmart has removed seven types of Grreat Choice Dog Biscuits from its shelves. According the company, there have been no reports of illness from the biscuits, and the recall is a voluntary precaution. This appears to be the only pet product affected by the recall so far. Read the Food & Drug Administration's most recent information--with a list of affected products.

 

The Washington Post reports that the FDA has issued repeated warnings over chicken jerky products imported from China. There has been no recall. Symptoms from ingesting the unidentified poison include "decreased activity, vomiting, diarrhea (sometimes with blood) and increased water consumption and urination." 

 

Wellness: Food & Nutrition
Himalayan Dog Chew
An All-natural Snack for Serious Chewers

We’ve found a healthy treat to engage even the busiest dogs for hours: Himalayan Dog Chew from Mukilteo, Washington. Slow-heated using a traditional Himalayan recipe, the treat has only three ingredients, all of them 100 percent natural: yak milk, cow milk and lime juice. A treat that has no chemicals or preservatives and lasts for hours? This one’s Lola-approved! And don’t forget to stop back in and let us know what you think.

Wellness: Food & Nutrition
What Does Camel Milk Do for Dogs’ Health?

Denizens of the Middle East, Africa and India have long believed camel milk — loaded with fatty acids, antioxidants and vitamins — contains medicinal, aphrodisiac and even magical properties. Now it appears to hold promise for dogs in the treatment of Type 1 diabetes, if promise can be derived from a small 2009 study in Tunisia. Researchers at the Arid Land Institute found that dogs given 250 or 500 milliliters of raw camel milk (which is naturally high in insulin) daily experienced a significant and lasting decrease in blood glucose, as well as decreases in protein concentrations and cholesterol levels after three weeks.

It’s one of many studies touted by Millie Hinkle, a naturopathic doctor in Chapel Hill, N.C., who has for years championed the potential for camel milk in treating humans for autism, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, food allergies, Crohn’s and Parkinson’s diseases and more. But until recently, the milk of two-toed ruminants was not available in the U.S.

In 2009, Hinkle successfully lobbied the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to permit the sale of camel milk for the first time. In addition, her company, Camel Milk USA, helps domestic camel dairies get started — using dromedary camels, which are heartier, more productive and more common than the two-humped Bactrian camel. As of June, there were nine established and 13 planned camel dairies — all in states that can legally sell raw camel milk for dogs. (States set their own regulations for raw and pasteurized milk sales.) She also facilitates domestic medical research on camel milk, which currently includes a study focused on treating lymphoma in dogs.

Meanwhile, Hinkle gave camel milk (left over from a study) to her own dog, a young Maltese named Winter. “His behavior changed immediately,” she says. Normally “he’s a barker; he won’t stop. He’s sort of aggressive. We gave him the milk and he became very settled. The barking stopped. I said, ‘Boy, I really need this.’” Fair warning: Winter also gained two pounds in a week.

Wellness: Food & Nutrition
Five Reasons to Make Your Dog's Dinner
Donald Strombeck's book cooks up nutritious recipes for your dog.

When he wrote Home-Prepared Dog and Cat Diets: The Healthful Alternative, Donald R. Strombeck, DVM, PhD, created one of the first-of-its-kind pet nutrition books. It went on to become a standard reference for veterinarians and those looking for an alternative to commercial pet food.

Once again the professor emeritus at the University of California School of Veterinary Medicine is breaking ground and demonstrating that his overriding concern is for the health of dogs and cats. When the first edition went out of print, the good doctor made all the information available free at dogcathomeprepareddiet.com.

So, why DIY? Here are a few simple reasons to homeprepare your dog’s food, according to Dr. Strombeck.
 

  • You can select and know the quality of the ingredients. Even when ingredients are listed on a commercial pet food label, you can’t verify the quality.
     
  • When you prepare food at home, you can avoid the risks of contamination by bacteria, fungi and chemicals, including ingredients added to produce the desired color, texture, shelf life and palatability.
     
  • You also avoid errors that can happen during any one of the many steps in the processing of commercial pet food including inadequate cooking and contamination from poorly cleaned equipment.
     
  • You won’t be being misled by claims of formulations being balanced and complete when they are not.
     
  • Doing it yourself gives you more control over special-needs diets. Commercial pet foods’ special diet claims often have no merit.

    Click here to read our 2007 interview with Dr. Strombeck.

  • Wellness: Healthy Living
    Can Diet Overcome DNA?
    Scientists investigate the new field of nutrigenomics.

    Have you ever had problems losing weight and wondered if you’re just genetically fat and doomed to your pudgy fate? If so, you may be in luck. Scientists studying nutrition and genetics in dogs are helping to debunk the myth that your genes set your physiologic fate in stone.

    “Your DNA tells you everything you could be. It doesn’t tell you everything you are going to be,” says Dr. Steven Hannah, Director of Molecular Nutrition at Nestlé Purina PetCare.“There are many factors that modify the ultimate expression of an animal.” One such factor is diet.

    New studies are finding that diets can alter the expression of genes. In other words, they can determine which genes are active. In fact, there’s now a branch of nutrition called “nutrigenomics” dedicated to the study of how nutrients affect gene expression.

    In an active gene, a segment of DNA is transcribed to RNA, which can then be translated into many copies of a single protein. Each gene codes for a different protein and each protein has a slightly different job. Some proteins provide structure, such as the protein in muscle or collagen.Other proteins, called enzymes, drive the chemical reactions that create the various hormones, neurotransmitters and products needed by the body, as well as creating products that serve as energy to power the body.

    In humans, the study of nutrigenomics is slow because there are too many factors to consider in a person’s normal life—even in just their diet. But with dogs, researchers have already discovered diets that alter arthritis and obesity.

    How does nutrigenomics come into play in developing these diets? First, the company or researcher identifies gene expression profiles in affected and normal dogs.Next, they figure out which ingredients they believe will change the gene expression profile from that of an affected dog to that of a healthy one. Then they formulate a mixture, feed it to the affected individuals and see if the gene expression profile changes in a positive way. For instance, in the case of arthritis or degenerative joint disease, researchers at Purina compared the gene expression profile of normal, healthy cartilage cells, called “chondrocytes,” to that of arthritic chondrocytes.

    “We have constructed a gene expression array chip that has virtually every gene known in the dog,” states Hannah. “It has tens of thousands of genes on it. We took the chondrocyte cell’s RNA and applied it to the chip.” The chip, in turn, revealed every gene whose expression was affected.

    “We were able to identify which genes in the tissue were up- and down-regulated in arthritis,” says Hannah.“Because those genes are codes for all of the proteins the cell was making, it’s a snapshot in time of what the cell is planning to do biochemically.” (“Up-regulation” and “down-regulation” are the processes by which cells increase or decrease, respectively, the quantity of a cellular component, such as RNA or protein, in response to an external variable.)

    By examining the 325 up-regulated genes and the 25 down-regulated genes, Purina researchers were able to look at the biochemical decision of the arthritic cell compared to a healthy chondrocyte cell. What they found was that the arthritic cells were up-regulating specific enzymes that degrade the cartilage and down-regulating enzymes that inhibit the degradation process. That is, they were primed for cartilage destruction.

    The next step was to determine what dietary changes might affect the joint. These tests started in petri dishes. First, the researchers grew chondrocytes in cell culture and added inflammatory mediators that would be seen with any joint injury. This made the chondrocytes look arthritic. Then they added nutrients at various concentrations to see which nutrients would help the cells repair.With that testing, they found that omega-3 fatty acids provided good results, and they were able to determine which levels worked best.

    But, as Hannah points out, “We can’t feed the nutrient directly into an animal’s joint. There’s no cell culture dog food. Rather, we needed to next see if we could get the nutrient from the food in the same concentrations into the dogs’ joint.”They needed to know if the fish oil would be digested, absorbed and then the omega-3 fatty acids transported to the joint in concentrations shown to be effective in the cell culture.

    “Luckily, at the time, Colorado State was conducting an arthritis study in dogs,” says Hannah.“We were able to put these dogs on test diets with different levels of omega-3 fatty acids and then analyze the joints.” They quickly found that they were indeed able to match the levels that they had gotten in the petri dish.

    “That’s all nice,” says Hannah,“but the bigger question is whether the dog actually cares. Does it make a clinical difference?” That’s where force-plate analysis came in. This process determines whether a dog’s lameness has improved; researchers did find improvement in the dogs’ physical abilities.

    “We were able to verify that the changes in the gene expression profile were accompanied by changes in the corresponding enzyme levels too,” says Hannah. “After the diet, the joints contained less metalloprotease, an enzyme that degrades the cartilage, and more protein that inhibited the metalloproteases. So the omega-3 down-regulated the enzymes that chew up cartilage and up-regulated factors that inhibit the degradation.”

    Another major area of nutrigenomics research is in obesity. “We’ve looked at the gene expression profile in obese patients,” says Dr. Todd Towell of Hill’s Pet Nutrition.“We can see a huge difference in gene expression between dogs who are obese and those who are lean.”

    What classes of genes are different? The short answer is that at the level of gene expression, obese dogs are up-regulated at systems that make them efficient at storing fat in adipose tissue. They are fat storers. Those who are lean are more efficient at burning fat for energy.

    Armed with this information, researchers set out to answer the million-dollar question: Is it possible to design a diet that would both allow weight loss and change the gene profile? To find out, Hill’s researchers fed overweight animals a new weight-reduction diet and then looked at their gene expression profiles; they looked at percent of body fat and genomic analysis at the onset of the study and then again after four months on the diet. All the dogs went from overweight to lean, and those on the new diet showed a change in 254 genes—240 were down-regulated and 14 were upregulated. The diet had changed the dogs’ metabolisms from fat-storing to fat-burning.

    Interestingly, in a similar study with dogs on a high-protein weight-loss diet, dogs also went from fat to lean, but their gene expression profiles remained those of metabolically obese dogs. So they were still fat-storers, which suggests they would gain weight back. Because it’s the gene expression in the fat cells that’s important, the downside to this study is that researchers tested the gene expression in blood cells but did not test it in the fat cells where fat is actually stored; their assumption was that gene expression was also changing in the fat cells.

    Another researcher who has looked at gene-expression changes in fat is Dr. Kelly Swanson, adjunct assistant professor at the University of Illinois, Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine. “We fed a fructooligosaccharide, which is a fiber-like substance that’s not digested by the host but preferentially stimulates the beneficial microbes in the gut.” In other words, the fructooligosaccharide hangs around in the gut, where it serves as food for beneficial microbes. As a result, it allows the beneficial microbes to flourish.

    The results? The diet improved insulin sensitivity in fat cells of obese dogs. Several genes that coded for proteins important in lipid regulation and oxidation were up-regulated. These results suggest that a diet with fructooligosaccharides could be useful in diabetic patients.

    These findings are just the start. Says Hannah,“Researchers are routinely using nutrigenomics to understand physiology and biology at a new level. Instead of just trying to find individual genes that predispose dogs to developing diseases such as diabetes or obesity, researchers are now asking, ‘What about all of the genes and corresponding pathways?’ It’s about understanding how a molecule or nutrient changes gene expression.”

    Says Swanson, “With nutrigenomics, you often get to disease states you don’t understand. If you can identify the genes and pathways affected in the disease process and know the effect of nutrition on that same process, you can determine the biological mechanisms to target.”

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