Home
health care
News: Guest Posts
Another Recall
Pig ears and beef hooves recalled for salmonella.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a health alert, last week, warning consumers not to use pig ears or beef hooves pet treats manufactured by Pet Carousel because they may be contaminated with salmonella. It sounds like these treats could be for sale just about anywhere—they were distributed nationwide and to chain stores. Brands to look out for include Doggie Delight and Pet Carousel for ears and hooves, plus Choo Hooves and Dentley’s for hooves only.

According the FDA no illness has been associated with the products. The presence of salmonella was detected during routine testing by the agency in September 2009. Read more about the recall, handling and symptoms in humans and pets.

According to the PETCO Scoop, that company has removed all Pet Carousel hooves from its shelves and has issued a statement that it does not carry pigs ears from the company. As of yesterday, PetSmart has voluntarily pulled 14 hoof products off its shelves.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Salmon Poisoning Affects Dogs
Life-threatening illness requires treatment.

Salmon poisoning is a rare but serious condition in dogs. If not treated, around 90 percent of the dogs with this malady will not survive it. The cause of the disease is a bacteria that lives within a fluke that is a parasite of fish. Dogs ingest the fluke parasite and the bacteria inside it when they eat raw fish. The life cycle of the parasite involves both fish and snail hosts.

Salmon poisoning is not well known, perhaps because it only affects a few species, including dogs, and only salmon seem to be carriers of the parasite that contains the dangerous bacteria. In addition, the whole system of hosts, parasites, and bacteria occurs in a relatively isolated geographic area—west of the Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon, Washington, California and British Columbia.

Symptoms of the disease include severe intestinal upset, fever and swollen lymph nodes. If your dog has eaten raw fish in this region of the world, especially if any of these symptoms are present, veterinary treatment is essential. Be sure to tell your veterinarian if your dog may have been exposed to this disease.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
An Alternative to Lab Testing
Family pets help test experimental cancer treatments.

A new alternative to traditional laboratory testing helps assess cancer treatments for humans, while providing options to dying pets. Dogs have become more favorable to researchers because they experience cancer in similar ways to humans. Like their two-legged counterparts, canines develop secondary cancers and become resistant to drugs over time.

Unlike studies of the past, scientists don’t induce illness in the subjects. The experimental treatments are made available to pets already diagnosed with cancer.

Participating dogs continue to live at home while their family collaborates on the research, keeping detailed records on quality of life and behavior. Maintaining a normal living arrangement contributes to a more realistic reaction to the illness and treatment as compared to the more traditional laboratory rat living in a controlled environment.

Some of the experimental treatments have undergone human testing and require animal testing for regulatory reasons, but most have not been tested in humans at all.

Currently 19 veterinary institutions in the U.S. have trials underway, while Europe is still evaluating whether they want to test drugs using this new method.

After writing about the history of animal testing in June, it’s heartbreaking to learn what we’ve subjected animals to in the name of medicine. While there are ethical implications with any kind of testing, I’m glad that scientists are exploring ways of developing treatments that consider the welfare of those who have advanced the medical breakthroughs that we rely on. 

News: Guest Posts
Hard Times
Funds that help strapped guardians are struggling.

Meet Marley, left. (Not that Marley, but just as cute.) He was injured in a dog attack and suffered a broken jaw. Being just a pup, he healed nicely, but he was bandaged and required intravenously feeding for two weeks. Marley’s veterinary team treated him with tender loving care, and when the cost of his care became too much for the family, found him a new, permanent home. He’s doing much better now and is once again playing the part of the mischievous pup. A grant from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Helping Pets Fund helped cover Marley’s expenses.

Regardless of all those stories about green shoots and the start of an economic recovery, increasing numbers of dog and cat guardians need help paying for everything from big vet bills to routine animal care—at precisely the same time resources for these programs is shrinking. Inquires for assistance from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Helping Pets Fund have tripled, and earlier this year the fund suspended grants, according to a story in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

JAVMA News also reports that the balance is decreasing at the Lucky Fund at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, which as been subsidizing veterinary bills for owners whose pets have a good chance at recovery and otherwise cannot afford the care or obtain credit to finance it since 1995. Due to limited funding, NY SAVE (Save Animals in Veterinary Emergency) has been turning away pets weekly, and could deny funds for 312 pets by the end of the year—without help. NY SAVE is a philanthropic program of the Veterinary Medical Association of New York City, serving the five boroughs since 1998.

 

News: Guest Posts
In the ER: Treating a Dog's Gunshot Wounds
Make My Day: What would you do?

Many emergency veterinarians enjoy the challenge of gunshot wound cases, especially when we have a good outcome. It’s not very often, however, that a dog comes into our ER in critical condition from a gunshot wound, and survives, and the dog’s owner ends up dead from the very same thing. That is exactly what happened on the afternoon of November 2, 2003.

Mojo was a three-year old Miniature Pinscher, but did not deserve the “land shark” label many MinPins end up with, as he normally was affectionate and friendly. He did like to bark, however, and that tendency would lead to the demise of his owner.

Just before Mojo arrived at our emergency room, his owners, Diane and Richard, found him collapsed in their yard, struggling to breathe. His gums were pale, and he had a wound on the left side of his chest. Oxygen helped him breathe; a quick X-ray showed two bullets in his chest. One bullet was lodged right next to his spine.

As soon as Richard, Mojo’s owner, realized what had happened, he left the emergency clinic and said he was going home. He appeared calm at the time, but his wife noted a look of determination in his eyes she had not seen before. After Richard left, our team of emergency vets and techs continued to work on Mojo, administering IV fluids, pain meds and more oxygen.

When Richard arrived back at his home in the rural town of Ault, Colo., he grabbed a stick of lumber and immediately went next door to confront his neighbor. He knew immediately where the bullet had come from, because his neighbor sometimes complained about Mojo’s barking. The neighbor also ran a jewelry business out of his home, and bragged about the collection of guns he kept for security.

Richard’s neighbor was waiting for him, apparently sitting in a chair in his living room with a shotgun across his lap. When Richard knocked on the door, he shouted at the neighbor to come outside. Threats were yelled back and forth. When the neighbor refused to come outside, Richard broke the small view window in the top of the door. A shotgun blast tore through the open window and hit Richard in the middle of his chest. The wounds proved to be fatal. The shooter was released from county jail nine days later under the Colorado “Make My Day” law, where deadly force can be used to protect one’s self, family and property if they are threatened. The issue of why he could shoot Mojo without penalty was never addressed.

Meanwhile, efforts to save Mojo continued, and proved successful. He was taken off oxygen, moved out of intensive care and started on oral pain meds and antibiotics. Our success in reviving him provided some solace to Diane, Richard’s widow.

Several months later, Diane moved with Mojo to another state to try and put their nightmare behind them. As far as I know, they are getting along OK.

Further investigation revealed that the second bullet in Mojo’s chest was from a previous gunshot, and multiple pellets were also found in the side of the house where Mojo used to roam the yard and bark. He had been used as target practice by the neighbor, whose intolerance of Mojo’s barking proved to test the limits of the law and human civility.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Saving at the Pharmacy
Pets are considered family with Walgreen’s Prescription Savings Club.

Recently I discovered that I could buy a generic version of Tapazole, my cat’s thyroid medication, through Walgreens’ Prescription Savings Club for a fraction of the branded version’s price. 

Through their savings club, Walgreens offers 400 generic medications priced at $12 for a 90-day supply. Membership is open to all those in the United States and Puerto Rico who are not enrolled in a publicly funded health care program, such as Medicare, Medicare, or TRICARE. 

Enrollment for an individual is $20 per year or $35 for an entire family, which includes a spouse, dependents under the age of 23, and pets.

Walgreens makes it easy to find out if a medication is covered with their online Drug Pricing Tool, as long as you know the generic name. In my case, a simple Google search revealed that the generic name of Tapazole is methimazole.

A 90-day supply of Tapazole costs $180 from my veterinarian and $70 ($50 when on sale) from online retailer, EntirelyPets.com. Buying methimazole through the Walgreens Prescription Savings Club is a significant savings at a mere $12. 

Before you sign up, be sure to talk to your veterinarian before switching to a generic drug. While non-branded drugs share the same active ingredient as their more expensive counterparts, the differences in inactive ingredients can alter the effects.

For more information on the Walgreens Prescription Savings Club or to enroll, visit the web site or one of their stores.

News: Guest Posts
Dogs Aren’t Little People
Remember, ibuprofen is OK for us, not for our dogs.

Last week my nephew called. He was dog-sitting our cousin's dog, Chester, and he was concerned about Chester’s stiff back legs. I suggested half an aspirin, and then I said, “Not Advil. That’s not good for dogs.” I said it. I felt it was true, but like a lot of do’s and dont’s, I couldn’t bet my life on it.

Lucky for my nephew, Chester and yours truly, I remembered correctly, as this recent, sobering reminder from Patrick Miles, DVM, reveals. Not only is ibuprofen toxic for dogs—and more so for cats—the consequences can be severe. But don’t trust me, read Dr. Miles post. And, keep those bottles of Advil, Motrin, Midol, etc., safely out of your dog’s way.

News: Guest Posts
Listen To Your Dog
A non-doglover heeds Malti-Poo’s warning.

My editor sent me a story a few weeks back about a woman who says a dog saved her from a life-threatening brain injury. I added the story to my virtual "To Read" folder and only got to it yesterday, when it hit me like a ton of bricks. The short version: A nurse in Missouri was fighting off what she thought was a severe migraine headache when a colleague’s Maltese-Poodle mix (for whom she had no love-loss) began licking her right temple “as though it had been smeared with bacon grease”--in the words of a St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter. Mary Phillips took the dog’s intervention as a warning and shuttled off to the ER, where doctors discovered and repaired a “giant,” leaking aneurysm.

The story is one more anecdote in a growing body of evidence that dogs can detect health problems we miss, including cancer and low-blood sugar. It’s also a reminder that they have things to tell us—some urgent and some less so—if we will pay attention. For me personally, the story took me back to my mother. She too suffered a debilitating headache, which kept her home from church one Sunday. While the rest of us where away from home, she was taken to the hospital where doctors discovered an aneurysm. In her case, it was too late. Having lived a lifetime without her, I feel a special admiration for Jacques-Pierre, the Maltese-mix who convinced Phillips to see a doctor in time to save her life.

News: Guest Posts
Good News for Cavaliers
Top heart disease in dogs may not be an inevitable result of aging.

A discovery by a cardiac surgeon at Colorado State University refutes the accepted wisdom that mitral valve disease, the top heart disease in dogs, is an inevitable result of aging in pets. Dr. Chris Orton and his research team believe serotonin is driving the disease in dogs and humans.

“Serotonin is made in the brain and in cells in the gut. We previously thought that those were the only places it was made before it is circulated in the blood,” Orton explains, in a statement released by CSU. “But we found the local creation of serotonin in diseased heart valves. We think that drug-induced and naturally occurring heart valve disease share the same mechanism for creating the disease—the production of serotonin. The valve is making serotonin, which causes its own disease.”

The solution? Find a drug that inhibits the production of serotonin in the heart—which is exactly what Orton and his colleagues aim to do next. Why does this matter? Mitral valve disease, also often called mitral valve prolapse in humans, tends to impact smaller breed dogs and usually develops when they are middle aged or older. Chihuahuas, King Charles Spaniels, and other toy and small breeds tend to develop the disease more often than other breeds. According to CSU, of the dogs that develop heart disease, 40 percent develop mitral valve disease, and the disease is the eventual cause of about 70 percent of all heart failure in dogs.

Orton heads up Project CARE at Colorado State. The project focuses on researching the causes of and development of new treatments for mitral valve disease in dogs. The project is supported through grass roots funding. To learn more about the program or to support the research, visit Project CARE.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Animal Health Is A Booming Business
Pharmaceutical companies vie for a piece of the growing animal health industry.

For years animal health was a mere afterthought to pharmaceutical companies. Now with slowing growth in the human health field, and the proliferation of generic drugs, these companies are looking to animal health to diversify. The sector’s predictable cash flow, high margins and brand loyalty have made animal health a much more stable business than human pharmaceuticals. 

Merck and Pfizer’s animal health businesses have grown to $4.27 billion and $400 million in annual sales respectively. With both companies looking to sell part of their assets, several pharmaceutical companies are vying to own a piece of this rapidly expanding market.

According to U.K.-based research company, Vetnosis Ltd., animal drug sales grew 7.2 percent last year compared to 1.3 percent for human medicine. The sector has grown steadily despite economic cutbacks in veterinary care.

While much of the industry’s business stems from caring for the food we eat, our society’s changing view of pets is certainly making a large contribution. Merial’s Frontline flea and tick products alone account for about half of its $2.5 billion in sales.

With the recent development of ground breaking drugs like canine cancer treatment, Palladia, it’s clear that the pharmaceutical industry is finally taking pets seriously. While I’m a little worried about the potential cost of these new drugs (just look at our current health care debacle!), I’m always happy to see advances in the veterinary field that will improve the lives of our beloved pets.

Pages