Home
health care
News: Karen B. London
Losing Puppies to Disease
Canine distemper strikes close to home.

Some friends recently lost two puppies to canine distemper. During the time when first one puppy, and then the second was succumbing to the disease, they were caught up in a painful swirl of grief, loss, information-seeking, medication use, and continuous attempts to comfort the puppies, their children and each other.

Obviously, it is painful to lose a dog of any age, but there is a particular kind of unbearable heartbreak associated with the loss of a puppy.

Have you lost a dog prematurely to disease? What happened and what would you like other people to know to try to prevent it happening to them? Do you have any wise or comforting words if, despite all the best efforts, it happens anyway?

News: JoAnna Lou
FDA Approves the First Canine Cancer Drug
Palladia offers options for treating the second most common canine tumor.

Earlier this year, I attended an agility trial in New Jersey that was raising money for canine cancer research. Decorating the arena were pictures of dogs who had cancer at some point in their lives. There were more than 100 photo montages covering every inch of free space. 

During an intermission tribute, handlers were asked to raise their hand if they ever had a dog affected by cancer. I was shocked to see well more than half the audience with their hand up and soon learned that canine cancer effects one out of every three dogs.

Since then, two of my friends found tumors on their dogs, one benign and one malignant. Thankfully, both were successfully removed, but the topic has stayed on my mind. So I was excited to hear that this month the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug developed specifically for the treatment of canine cancer. Palladia, an oral drug, works by cutting off the blood supply to mast cell tumors, the second most common tumor in dogs.

Palladia will be available next year through veterinary oncologists and internists. There are a number of side effects and, like any drug, will have its limitations. But Palladia is a huge step in the right direction for curing this horrible disease.

News: JoAnna Lou
WebMD for Dogs
DoggedHealth helps pet lovers diagnose canine health problems.

If you’re like me, there are certain websites that you don’t know how you ever lived without. One of the first that comes to mind is the popular medical diagnostic site, WebMD.

Finally, a similar resource has been created for canines. Earlier this year, DoggedHealth debuted the Diagnostic Dog as an information resource to empower pet lovers to make educated healthcare decisions for their four-legged family members. Users can click on a map of the canine body to access articles about related health problems. All content is written by a veterinarian or a dog trainer, depending on the topic. 

I’m looking forward to being able to refine searches by symptom (a WebMD feature), which DoggedHealth is in the process of developing. Diagnostic Dog certainly won’t replace my veterinarian, but it’s a great resource for increasing my knowledge before I step into the office. Of course like WebMD, Diagnostic Dog has the potential to make worried pet parents a bit paranoid, but it’s comforting to know that a wealth of information is only a few clicks away.

What are your favorite canine-related websites?

News: Guest Posts
Just Between Us
The Swine Flu outbreak should pose little risk to cats and dogs.

There is one worrisome scenario you can cross off your flu fear list. According to a recent statement from the ASPCA, the H1N1 virus—unfortunately known as “Swine Flu”—is not likely to jump the species barrier again and start infecting cats and dogs.
 
“At this time there is no data demonstrating any risk of dogs and cats contracting this strain of the virus,” says Dr. Louise Murray, the Director of Medicine at the ASPCA’s Bergh Memorial Hospital in New York City. For more information about swine flu and updated information on prevention, visit the Centers for Disease Control, the American Veterinary Medical Association and the World Health Organization.

News: Guest Posts
Bad Chemistry
What’s worse than fleas? Maybe flea collars.

Almost before I finished typing up a blog about a disturbing report on the canine health risks posed by over-the-counter, spot-on pesticides, I saw the latest news about flea collars. Last week, the National Resource Defense Council filed a lawsuit alleging that 16 retailers and manufacturers—we’re talking the big guys here—failed to warn consumers about exposure to unsafe levels of known carcinogens and neurotoxins in violation of California anti-toxics laws.

Once again we’re being warned: “Just because it’s sold in stores doesn’t mean it’s safe.”

The NRDC’s groundbreaking Poison on Pets II study found “that high levels of pesticide residue can remain on a dog’s or cat’s fur for weeks after a flea collar is put on an animal. Residue levels produced by some flea collars are so high that they pose a risk of cancer and damage to the neurological system of children up to 1,000 times higher than the EPA’s acceptable levels.” Something tells me the fact that this study identifies the risk to two-legged children will help the cause garner broader attention.

Meanwhile, it’s flea season across the nation and guardians need better, safer options right way. At Green Paws, the NRDC offers practical advice including a video (see below) on fighting fleas the old fashioned way, a product guide, and a wallet-sized primer on chemicals and herbal options.

 

News: Guest Posts
Good News for Dogs With Epilepsy
Veterinary clinical trial offers a chance for FREE medical treatment.

Discovering that your dog has epilepsy can be frightening. That the cause of the recurring seizures cannot be identified—known as idiopathic epilepsy—only makes matters worse. But there is some good news. A large, nationwide veterinary clinical trial for the purpose of evaluating a new medication for the treating idiopathic epilepsy is underway. The trial not only means a boost for research, it may be a boost for recession-strapped guardians.

Despite estimates that idiopathic epilepsy may affect up to 5.7 percent of the dog population in the United States, very little is known about this disease. This study, the largest-known trial of its kind, should provide the foundation for new insights and treatments. Regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the veterinary clinical trial is being conducted in multiple cities with hundreds of dogs.

Will your dog qualify? Participating dogs must be at least 4 months old, have not been previously treated with anti-seizure medication, weigh at least 11 pounds, and have no previous history of seizure clusters or status epilepticus. In addition, dogs cannot be pregnant or suspected to be pregnant and must be evaluated an investigator within seven days of the most recent seizure.

Here’s the bonus: Dogs that meet the initial qualifications for the study receive free medical evaluations, as well as in-depth diagnostic tests, which may include a CAT scan or MRI. If enrolled in the study, dogs also receive free medication (no placebo) and monthly exams. In addition to free study specific care, owners of enrolled dogs are also eligible to have funds credited to their accounts at their referring family veterinarian.

For more information, talk to your veterinarian, review these frequently asked questions, or call 1-888-598-7125, ext. 208.

News: Karen B. London
FDA Investigates Nutro Dog Food
Illnesses may be linked to food. UPDATED.

[Editor's Note: ConsumerAffairs.com has reported that the FDA is denying reports of an investigation into Nutro, contradicting individuals who say they have been contacted about Nutro by FDA investigators, as well as others in the FDA. We'll keep following this story. Meanwhile, readers have posted some interesting comments including an inside perspective from someone who claims to be a former employee.]

 

There has long been talk that Nutro Dog Food may be responsible for illnesses in many dogs, but the company has denied these claims and maintained that their food is safe. It may be some time before the truth is sorted out, but we do now know that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the company.

Food safety continues to be a huge issue for both people and our pets, and we must be cautious about everything we feed our dogs. It may be a long time before we know whether or not Nutro Dog Food is causing these problems, but the fact that an investigation is underway to determine the truth is a good thing.

News: Karen B. London
Dog Survives Eating Underwear
Intimate issues Down Under

A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel in Australia required an expensive life-saving surgery to remove a blockage. The culprit turned out to be a black lacy G-string; the elastic had gotten tied up in his intestines. Naturally, many folks are having a laugh over this embarrassing (to his guardian) discovery now that the dog is okay, but blockages caused by ingesting non-food items are serious and scary because they can be life threatening.

Dogs who like to eat items that are not food are common. Most go for socks and underwear, but ask the average veterinarian, and you are bound to hear stories of towels, ace bandages, stockings, carpets, gravel, pens, knives, spoons and, of course, the proverbial homework. Prevention is the safest path since few dogs give up this habit unless all temptation is removed, and it’s by far the least expensive. If you have a dog who is an “eater” you have excellent motivation to thoroughly dog-proof your home, which includes training all members of the household not to leave clothes or other items of interest to the dog within reach. With practice, the result is an exceptionally clean house and a safe, healthy dog.

News: Guest Posts
Must Read: Pesticide Report
Buyer beware of over-the-counter, spot-on pesticide products.

Reading between the corporate disclaimers and regulator hedging, my takeaway from the thorough and impressive investigation into over-the-counter, spot-on pesticide products for pets by The Center for Public Integrity is: Why risk it? And it’s beginning to look like the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) might be asking the same question.

Based on an unprecedented review of 10 years’ worth of adverse-reaction reports filed with the EPA by pesticide manufacturers, The Center reported in December an alarming number of deaths had been linked to topical pesticide products with pyrethrins and pyretroids. These reports include chilling accounts of chemical burns, nerve damage, anorexia and 1,600 deaths over the past five years. On April 16, the EPA “announced that it would intensify its evaluation of these products ‘due to recent increases in the number of reported incidents.’”

I strongly urge anyone currently using over-the-counter, spot-on pesticide treatments to read the report through to the end. (If you’re wondering about the reporters’ angle: The Center for Public Integrity is a nonprofit, non-partisan organization dedicated to producing investigative journalism on a broad variety issues of public concern. Past stories have included an expose on the use of the Lincoln Bedroom for political contributors in the Clinton administration, publishing secret Patriot II Act draft legislation, and reporting that Halliburton was the largest private contractor in Iraq and Afghanistan.)

Certain details in the story jumped out at me, including the fact that the high concentrations of pyrethroid used in pet products range from between eight to 17 times stronger than the strongest pyrethroid product currently approved for use on humans. Plus, recent findings that pyrethroids in young rats “could result in detrimental effects on neurological function later in life” even when there are no immediate, acute symptoms.

The report also points out that EPA approval is no guarantee of safety. Since 2000, pet products with chlorpyrifos, diazinon and phosmet were successively “approved, defended aggressively by the chemical industry, and then yanked off the market.”

News: JoAnna Lou
The Kindness of Pet Lovers
Web site raises money for a shelter dog’s vet bills.

The faltering economy has forced many people to make sacrifices. But what about their furry family members? I’ve heard stories of people eating Ramen noodles in order to buy pet food and forgoing gym memberships in favor of doggy daycare. However, unexpected vet bills can be the tipping point. Injuries often lead to thousands of dollars in surgery, leaving many pet owners with little choice but to choose what has been called “economic euthanasia.”

Marley, a terrier mix puppy in Florida, found himself in a similar situation when he was attacked by another dog. His owner couldn’t afford to fix his wounds, fractures and dislocated jaw, opting to end his suffering by putting him to sleep.

Luckily Marley was rescued by Heidi’s Legacy, but even a grant and discounted vet rates couldn’t cover his expensive surgeries. The rescue group then turned to fundraising web site, Fundable, to collect donations for the balance. So far, thanks to many generous pet lovers, they’ve already reached 38 percent of their $550 goal.

While there are plenty of rescue dogs, like Marley, who have fundraising web pages, Fundable is filled with regular pet owners who have lost their job or put their vet bill on a credit card hoping to pay it off during better times. Fundable currently has 67 ongoing collections that come up under a search for “dog,” each with its own heartbreaking story.

Personally, I’ve found the canine community to be incredibly supportive. From giving job advice to an unemployed obedience club member to supporting a fellow agility competitor’s cancer fund, I’ve seen dog people step up to the plate for one another time and time again. So it doesn’t surprise me that Fundable has been successful in reaching out to pet lovers all over the internet to help those in need.

Pages