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News: Editors
“Blowing” Off Mosquitoes
Fans can provide relief from summer stingers

No one likes mosquitoes. And since only one bite from an infected one can spread heartworm in our dogs, we have to be doubly aware of how to prevent being bitten by them. The New York Times had an interesting piece that looked at the effectiveness of using wind—in the form of a fan—to deter flying pests from landing on you or on your dog. What makes the fan an effective deterrent is that it “dilutes and disperses” carbon dioxide that we, and our dogs, exhale. CO2 is the major chemical that attracts mosquitoes! Entomologists at Michigan State University who studied this link concluded “fan-generated wind should be pursued as a practical means of protecting humans or pets from mosquitoes in the backyard setting.”

News: Guest Posts
Urban Wanderers
Rescued strays inspire art and hopefully donations

An indomitable stray named Chill is among many cats and dogs providing inspiration for dozens of works of art—paintings, photographs, sculptures and drawings—in an exhibition entitled Urban Wanderers, which opens at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art next Friday, July 16.

  Chill was a neglected, abused street dog until she was rescued by Randy Grim of Stray Rescue of St. Louis, a no-kill organization dedicated to rescuing stray animals in need of medical attention and place them in loving, adoptive homes.   “Man can be downright evil and cruel at times. One such person felt it necessary to disfigure, crush and mutilate parts of Chill’s body and cut off one foot,” Grim writes in his story about the decision to rescue her. “No longer could she run or play with her pack. Her mutilated body made it impossible for her to scavenge for food or keep up with her horde of dogs that provided a sense of security and being. For the past month, we wondered where she was but now we know, she was unable to move. She was dying.”   They rushed her broken, flea-infested, anemic and infected body to an emergency vet where she has seen many months of intensive care. She is now healing—physically and emotionally—at home with Grim until she is ready to move to a wonderful full-time home. Read her complete story here and here.   The Urban Wanderers exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 16, at 6 p.m. Stray Rescue supporter and actress Loretta Swit will attend the reception and several of her paintings will be displayed. In addition, rescued dogs and cats will use their paws, tails and noses to create works for the show.   All these creations, as well as select pieces by Swit, will be available for purchase through a silent auction to benefit Stray Rescue of St. Louis. The exhibition is free-of-charge, open to the public and runs through August 29.   In related news, the lack of shelter space that, in part, contributed to Grim’s need to triage strays, including Chill, is improving. Soon, Stray Rescue St. Louis will open the doors of a new Animal Companion Center, with 69 kennel runs. Initially, dogs will be transferred to this facility from the city pound in Gasconade, which is in a crisis. Additional, runs will be added in a second phase at the new shelter.
News: JoAnna Lou
Fighting for a Variance
Should dogs be allowed in coffee shops?

As I’ve blogged previously, I love being able to bring my dogs everywhere possible, especially restaurants. While health codes keep dogs outside on the patio, there are certain bars and coffee shops that let pets inside. For a long time my area had Coffee Labs in Tarrytown, N.Y., a cafe that encouraged patrons to bring their dogs, even though it was not technically allowed.

Earlier this year, the Westchester Country Department of Health issued a warning that ended seven years of canines gracing the shop. As you can imagine, local dog loving customers were devastated.

Since then, owners Alicia Kelligrew and Mike Love, have been working towards getting a dog variance issued. They argue that food is not prepared on-site and they haven’t had any problems in seven years of operation. The duo already has a petition with over 2,000 signatures.

Last Thursday, Alicia and Mike took the request to the local Board of Health meeting. The 12-person board will ultimately decide whether or not to grant a variance to Coffee Labs. No decision has been made yet and there will likely be a public discussion before that happens.

I understand the concern for not allowing pets in a food store, and if all people were responsible and respectful it wouldn't be a problem. However, it would be nice if the two sides could meet in the middle – like allowing dogs at stores that don't prepare food on premise.

Do you think dogs should be allowed in coffee shops?

News: Karen B. London
ChocoTox
An iPhone app that can help dogs

ChocoTox is an iPhone application that determines whether or not a dog has ingested a toxic amount of chocolate. You enter the dog’s weight, the amount of chocolate eaten, and the type of chocolate. The type of chocolate is as critical as the other two factors because the darker the chocolate, the more theobromine it contains, and theobromine is what is actually toxic to dogs. Once you’ve entered this information, ChocoTox lets you know if a visit to the veterinarian is warranted.

  In her blog about ChocoTox, Nancy Kay, DVM and author of Speaking for Spot points out that there are situations in which veterinary intervention is essential. These include if more than one dog has gotten into chocolate so that there’s no way of knowing how much each dog consumed; if the wrapper or other packaging was also ingested; or if anything else toxic (such as drugs) was in the chocolate that the dog ate.   I’m sure I’m not the only person who has ever had a dog eat chocolate by mistake. My Lab mix once helped himself to a giant serving of chocolate chip cookies that were cooling on the counter. Luckily, he ate far too little chocolate to suffer anything more than perhaps an overly full belly. Has your dog gotten into anything chocolate, and if so, did it become a serious situation?

 

News: Guest Posts
Food for Thought
Pondering the benefits of commercial pet food

When New York Times columnist Jane E. Brody wanted the truth about feeding our dogs and cats, she turned to Bark contributing editors Malden Nesheim, PhD, and Marion Nestle, PhD, who provided details about pet food that Bark regulars know well—such as, higher price doesn’t necessarily mean better quality.

But they also presented a bit of a paradigm shift, for me, regarding the $18-billion-a-year commercial pet food industry. After years of bad press resulting from catastrophic pet food recalls and ongoing questions about pet food safety, I’m used to thinking the worst about the industry. But here’s a tidbit on which to chew:

Because all pet food is made from the byproducts of human food production, Dr. Nestle says, "the pet food industry serves an important ecological function by using up food that would otherwise be thrown out."

And proponents of home-prepared foods—many motivated by nutritional and safety concerns—should consider this: "If everyone cooked human food for the 472 million cats and dogs in America, it would be like feeding an additional 42 million people."

News: JoAnna Lou
Danger in the Driveway
Basketball hoops may contain deadly antifreeze

A friend recently e-mailed me about a German Shorthaired Pointer who died from ingesting antifreeze. Being animal lovers, the family had always been careful not to keep the toxic liquid around the house. 

Determined to find the source, they soon discovered that the antifreeze came from a portable basketball hoop in their driveway. Following the instruction manual, the previous owners had put antifreeze in the base to prevent the water, which weighs down the hoop, from freezing during the winter months. Small holes in the top of the base allowed some of the antifreeze to leak out.

I was shocked to learn about this potential danger, particularly since portable basketball hoops are so popular. There are several on my street alone, although I don’t know if they contain antifreeze or not. 

As an alternative to the mixture of water and antifreeze, the ASPCA recommends filling bases with sand. They also caution the use of so called non-toxic antifreeze, as these liquids have the potential to cause gastrointestinal irritation, central nervous system depression, and death from respertory failure. 

I know I will be more mindful of basketball hoops when walking around the neighborhood and visiting friends.

News: JoAnna Lou
Taste Test
Humans and canines put treats head to head.

For humans, healthy food usually comes at the expense of taste. Given how concerned we are about feeding our pups the best, Lou Bendrick at Grist.org decided to run a humorously unscientific study on whether dogs prefer healthy or unhealthy treats. 

The testing panel included Burn the Border Collie, Lulu the Cockapoo, Sugar Ray the Pug, and Austin the Australian Shepherd. And to make sure the treats were safe, Lou had a group of humans taste test as well.

The experiment tested Wagatha’s Super Berry Biscuit, Newman’s Own Organics Salmon & Sweet Potato dog treat, Mr. Barky’s Vegetarian Dog Biscuits, Harmony Farms Health Bars with Apples & Yogurt, Organix Organic Dog Cookies (organic peanut butter flavor), and Milk Bone Medium Dog Biscuits. 

After much tasting, the canine favorite was Wagatha’s Super Berry Biscuit and the human favorite was Harmony Farms Health Bars with Apples & Yogurt.

I replicated the experiment on a smaller scale, but my chow hounds didn’t seem to discriminate like the dogs did in Lou’s study. They happily scarfed up any treat that came their way, healthy or not. 

Treats made with quality ingredients can get quite expensive, especially if you do a lot of training. Sometimes I’ll make my own treats, so I can control what goes in, but more often I just use fresh meat, like boiled chicken. Fresh, healthy, cheap, and my pups go crazy over the stuff!

What are your dogs’ favorite treats?

News: Guest Posts
Cats 1, Dogs 0
Study links asthma risk to dogs, not cats

I feel like I have a built-in radar for dog versus cat stories. Or rather, I’m sort of a magnet for them. I know it drives some Bark readers crazy—those who don’t feel a need to make comparisons and think I should stop feeding the feud. Well, if you are such a high-minded egalitarian read no further. If you’re with me (and keeping score), add a hash mark to the “Cat’s rule” side of the ledger.

 

A recent study, led by Dr. Chris Carlsten of Vancouver General Hospital in British Columbia, Canada, revealed a three-fold increase in the risk of asthma for children who were exposed to high levels of dog allergen. According to Carlsten, the culprit may be high levels of endotoxin on dogs, a microorganism known to cause inflammation in the lungs. Meanwhile, neither cat nor dust-mite exposure seemed to increase a child’s asthma risk. I wonder if parents who read the study will opt for cats when Susie and Jimmy start begging for a pet? (A big meow to our friends over at PawNation for this story.)

News: Guest Posts
Xylitol Alert
Artificial sweetner is dangerous to dogs

March 14 is the start of Poison Prevention Week, so here at The Bark we’ve been getting alerts about which household products are toxic to pets. The poisons lists feature pretty much the usual suspects, including, but not limited to, Ibuprofen (such as Advil), Acetaminophen (such as Tylenol), antidepressants, chocolate, certain fertilizers, pest control products, and a special Easter-season warning about certain types lilies that are especially toxic for cats. But the folks at the Pet Poison Helpline surprised us with xylitol.

Many sugarless gums, including some Trident, Orbit, and Ice Breaker brands as well as candies contain xylitol, a sweetener which is toxic to dogs. Desserts and baked goods can also be made with xylitol. Even small amounts when ingested can result in a life-threatening drop in blood sugar, or with large amounts of ingestion, liver failure. Signs of low blood sugar include vomiting, weakness, difficulty walking, tremors, and seizures. Treatment includes decontamination, checking a blood glucose/sugar level, treating with IV fluids and glucose, liver monitoring tests, and drugs to protect the liver.

Learn more at the Pet Poison Helpline including the tip sheet: Poison proof your home.
 

News: JoAnna Lou
Avoiding Plastic
Making adjustments for the environment and our health

This year, my New Year’s resolution isn’t to get back into shape or qualify for agility nationals, although they’re two things I am trying to do.

For 2010, I decided to keep it simple and reduce my dependence on plastic. Not only is it better for the environment, but as we’re increasingly finding, it’s better for our health, both human and canine.

Avoiding plastic isn’t easy, as I wrote about last year when I discovered that BPA is present even in canned food, but there are many easy switches we can make for our pups.

Food and Water Bowls
I’ve long used stainless steel bowls because they’re resistant to chewing and easy to clean. The Raise a Green Dog blog talks about the dangers of plastic and ceramic bowls, yet another reason to switch to stainless steel.

Food Storage
There are many plastic food storage options, but even if they’re made of food-safe materials, I’m still inclined to seek out a stainless steel version. The only option I’ve found that is big enough for a good amount of kibble is this version made by PetCo. I haven’t bought it yet because of the hefty price tag and the fact it’s endorsed by aversive trainer, Cesar Millan, but I haven’t found any good alternatives.

Poop Bags
So this doesn’t technically qualify as avoiding plastic, but currently I reuse the plastic bags my newspapers come in to pick up poop. I haven’t had to buy poop bags, but if I did, I’d consider biodegradable bags.

Shopping Bags
Using reusable bags has become very popular in recent years. It seems every store has their own version, however, PetCo and PetSmart’s versions raise money for animal-related charities.

Water Bottles
Filling stainless steel bottles with tap or filtered water will save you money while avoiding the potential risk of plastic. Recently, I even found a stainless steel bottle for pets. The roller ball mouth piece makes it perfect for travel.

These are just some small adjustments I’ve made to avoid plastic. I’d love to hear your tips and ideas!

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