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Blog: Karen B. London
It’s National Safety Month
What’s the best pet safety advice you ever needed?
In honor of National Safety Month, the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT) has compiled some ideas for keeping dogs safe. Their tips include basic first aid information, as well as tips for keeping your dog safe at the pool, outdoors including around wildlife, when traveling, during holidays, such as Christmas and the Fourth of July, and in a variety of other situations. The association...
Blog: Guest Posts
Barking Buddha
Stretch and connect with your dog through yoga.
Last week, I attended a book signing for Barking Buddha: Simple Soul Stretches for Yogi and Dogi. I was thrilled to pick up my own copy of the hot-of-the-presses guidebook by home-town yogini and massage therapist Brenda Bryan (with photos by my friend Bev Sparks). I swear this was before I learned the book includes a little profile shot of my dog Lulu in one of Bryan’s classes. Just look for...
Blog: Karen B. London
Bedbug-Detecting Dogs
Sniffing out the source leads to less pesticide use
Trained dogs detect land mines, drugs, explosives, missing persons, cancer, and just about anything else that they are physically capable of smelling. Julia Kamysz Lane recently blogged about how dogs can even sniff out peanuts and cash-carrying criminals. JoAnna Lou clued us in to their use in locating illegal DVDs. Now, add bedbugs to the list. There are dogs trained specifically to detect the...
Wellness: Healthy Living
Pet Safety Tips for Dog Emergencies
Bee stings, choking, ticks—it’s a cruel world out there. Be prepared!
The Pet Emergency Pocket Guide describes how to deal with a bee or wasp sting. Locate the site and remove stinger (scrape, don’t squeeze). Wrap ice cubes in a towel and apply to the area to alleviate pain and swelling. Benadryl or dephenhydramine liquid may help; call your local vet emergency clinic to confirm medication and dosage. Make a paste of baking soda and apply directly to the sting. (...
Wellness: Food & Nutrition
Save Money with Homemade Dog Food
Home cooking helps you feed ’em well for less.
When suppertime rolls around, there’s nothing like a healthy home-cooked meal. This is true not only for the human members of your family, but for your dog as well. Cooking for your canine companion has many benefits, including fewer preservatives and additives, more varied and potentially better ingredients and, of course, more interest for the canine palate. Homemade meals may even make it...
Wellness: Healthy Living
Choosing Safe Dog Toys
Choose toys with more than fun in mind
They make the world go round. They make it bounce, roll and soar. They’re objects that inspire play, enrich training, ease boredom and curb problem behaviors. Toys, according to the experts (and every dog worth his molars), are a must-have.  Despite the constant media comments about how we pamper our pets, toys are no mere luxury. Experts say that dogs need them, and need more than one kind....
Blog: Guest Posts
Safe Havens for Dogs and Cats
New shelter helps furry victims of domestic violence.
The statistics are daunting. In their lifetimes, approximately one in three women will be victims of domestic violence. And in those afflicted households with companion animals, pets often share in the violence and abuse. In fact, in a study of intentional animal abuse cases, 13 percent involved incidents of domestic violence. Up to 85 percent of women entering domestic violence shelters...
Blog: JoAnna Lou
World’s Oldest Dog Turns 21
Shelter pup is presented with a world record title and a party in her honor.
Last week, Chanel, a Dachshund from Long Island, N.Y., celebrated her 21st birthday at the New York Dog Spa and Hotel in Manhattan. Guinness World Records was on hand to present Chanel with a certificate for holding the title of world’s oldest living dog, a designation that she’s held since a 28-year old Beagle from Virginia passed away last spring.   While Chanel spends most of her time these...
Wellness: Healthy Living
Do Environmental Pollutants Cause Cancer in Dogs?
Do environmental pollutants cause canine cancer?
From the pesticides used in agriculture, insecticides and cleaners used in households, and solvents used in paints to toys made of synthetic products and artificial preservatives and additives in our food, man-made chemicals and pollutants are everywhere. With so many synthetic chemicals around us, could some of these products—as well as other aspects of our environment—be causing cancer in our...
Wellness: Health Care
Is Complementary and Alternative Medicine Right for Your Dog?
Is complementary and alternative medicine right for your dog?
Powell, my aging Dalmatian, had severe back and hip problems. Negotiating even shallow stairs sorely challenged him, and a light bump could cause him to collapse in a heap. Heart heavy, I’d watch him try to stay upright on the same trails he had trotted happily upon in the not-so-distant past. Supplements and meds from the vet had little effect—I had to find an alternative treatment plan or make...

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