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News: Guest Posts
Q&A with Maren Bussey
Young author follows shelter dogs in a new book

With more than 100 books to her credit, four adopted dogs in her home and a canine-behaviorist mother, it was probably only a matter of time before Maren Bussey wrote a book about shelter dogs. Tackling the project like a journalist, the cub reporter followed dozens of dogs surrendered to Maricopa County Animal Care and Control (MCACC) in her hometown of Phoenix, Ariz., and then profiled 15 in Forgotten Friends—Stories from an Animal Shelter. Bussey’s tales of lucky—and a few not-so-lucky—pups, along with daunting shelter facts and advice on how to help, make a compelling case for adoption aimed at young folks by one of their own. (The book is published on demand through booksbymaren.com, ten percent of the $20 cover price goes to MCACC.)

  TheBark.com: Why did you write Forgotten Friends? Maren Bussey: A lot of books for kids talk about getting pets from pet stores or “buying” pets. I thought it was important to teach kids about adopting and showing them that shelters are full of good dogs.   Do you have a favorite dog among those profiled in your story? I really like Toby and Rocket. They both have intriguing stories; Toby kept getting passed by, almost didn’t find a home and then found the perfect one. Rocket was also overlooked and then someone who worked at the shelter realized how great he was so adopted him herself!   Was it hard to write about the dogs who weren’t adopted? And why is it important to include them in your book? It was sad when I heard that two of my dogs didn’t get adopted. But I thought it was important to have their stories in my book to show that there are a lot of great dogs who don’t get adopted; not everyone will find a home. This, again, shows how important it is to adopt.   Why do you think so many people still don’t choose to adopt from a shelter or rescue? And what would you tell them to change their minds? I think a lot of people think shelters are full of dogs that are there because they are “bad” or have “issues.” Also, a lot of people think that purebred dogs are better than mutts. I would tell them that shelters have great dogs; many are there because something happened to their families and they couldn’t keep their dog anymore. One of the dogs in my book had to go to the shelter because her family’s house burned down and they couldn’t keep the dog. I would also tell them that mixed breeds are often healthier than purebreds and can be just as great, too!   You knew a lot about animal welfare issues before Forgotten Friends, did you learn anything new during the project? I was surprised to learn how many dogs and cats actually do not get adopted. I thought more people adopted, than actually do.   I read that you’ve written more than 100 books, any other dog books among them? What else do you like to write about? I wrote a book about one of my dogs and how we adopted him. I also like to write fantasy and science fiction.   What’s your next book? My next book is also about one of my dogs and all the funny stuff he does. That is all I can tell you right now… but it will also benefit a rescue organization.   Do you have a favorite book or story about a dog or dogs written by someone else? I liked Nobody’s Pets by Deborah White, a fiction book about dogs and cats living in shelters. Right now I’m reading Out of Harm’s Way by Terri Crisp. She has devoted her life to rescuing animals from disasters—she rescues everything from Great Danes to little frogs named Kermit!   Do you think you might be a writer or maybe a veterinarian when you grow up? Actually, I think I want to be a detective but I’ll probably keep writing just for fun.
News: JoAnna Lou
In Memory of Oreo
Cruelty sparks a movement for justice

Last week, the unimaginable happened to a member of the dog agility community. Michelle witnessed her beloved dog get run over by an angry neighbor who showed no remorse. Now, animal lovers are rallying to support Michelle and find justice for Oreo, which is likely to be a long road.

Laws have long been inadequate when it comes to penalizing animal abuse. In many states, animal cruelty is a mere misdemeanor.

In New York, Buster’s Law was created following the murder of a cat in 1997. The 18-month old tabby had been doused with kerosene and burned to death by a teenager. Buster’s Law made “aggravated cruelty to animals” a felony punishable by up to two years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

New York State Assemblyman, James Tedisco, is currently working to strengthen Buster’s Law. The connection between harming animals and people has been proven.  Infamous serial killers, Ted Bundy and Jeffrey Dahmer had a history of abusing animals. The teenager who murdered Buster has since been imprisoned for various crimes, including attempted rape and sexual abuse.

Oreo was an accomplished agility and obedience competitor, a certified therapy dog, and had a paying job working with autistic children. But above all, Oreo was a beloved family pet who is sorely missed. While nothing can be done to bring Oreo back, hopefully the dog community can come together to change the legal percussions for committing such a horrible crime.

For more information on this topic, the ASPCA has online resources to help prevent animal abuse and maintains a database of state animal cruelty laws. To support the Justice for Oreo cause, visit their web site for the latest news and information.

News: Guest Posts
Stamps to the Rescue!
New postage stamp aims to help shelter animals

According to today’s announcement by U.S. Postmaster General John E. Potter, pretty soon we’ll be able to not only seal our letters with a kiss, but stamp them with a dog or cat. OK, he didn’t say anything about kisses but the other part is true. The United States Postal Service (USPS) has created a series of stamps featuring the adorable mugs of five cats and five dogs, all of whom were rescued from a shelter in New Milford, Conn.

  “These stamps continue a Postal Service tradition of bringing attention to serious social issues of the day … one letter at a time,” Potter said. “This campaign will increase public awareness about sheltered pets and our hope is that it will encourage pet adoption and promote humane and responsible pet care.”   For you stamp collectors and trivia lovers, cats and dogs have been featured on other U.S. postage stamps, according to USPS public relations folks. A 13-cent stamp of a kitten and puppy playing in the snow was issued in 1982 for use on holiday postcards, in 1998, images of a cat and a dog were included in the “Bright Eyes” set of five pets, and most recently, in 2002, photographs of a kitten and puppy were featured on the “Neuter or Spay” stamps.   Animal Rescue stamps go on sale at post offices nationwide on April 30, but they can be pre-ordered beginning today at usps.com/shop, stampstotherescue.com, or by calling 1.800.STAMP.24 (1.800.782.6724).

 

News: Guest Posts
Fighting Dog Meat in China
Progress in the battle

Last January, I blogged about a rare government raid on a dog trader (for consumption) in Sichuan Province, which resulted in the rescue of 149 dogs from appalling conditions. Although that particular trader had violated the law dog meat is not only legal in China, it’s quite popular. But things may be changing. A year later it sounds like efforts to ban the practice of eating dogs and cats in China (and the attendant cruelty) are gaining ground, according to a recent story on CNN.com.

  If you want to be a part of this effort, learn more about out Animals in Asia’s campaign to ban dog meat, and the cruelty associated with the practice. Also, Korea Animal Rights Advocates is campaigning to end the practice of eating dogs in South Korea.

 

News: JoAnna Lou
An Unrealistic Ideal?
Two “no-kill” shelters are shut down due to crowding and neglect.

In an ideal world, no-kill shelters are safe havens where homeless animals stay as long as it takes to find their forever homes. In reality, these places are often strained for resources, forcing many to turn away animals that may be hard to place.

Last year, Julia Kamysz Lane wrote about the difficult dilemma of no-kill shelters. Recently, organizations that resist euthanasia have been in the news due to overpopulation and neglect. 

In January, the Clarksdale-Coahoma County Animal Shelter in Mississippi was shut down after 400 animals were discovered in a facility built to hold 60 dogs. The organization’s numbers quickly grew unmanageable since they did not turn away or euthanize any of the animals brought to the shelter. 

Last November, the Toronto Humane Society was raided by police and the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (OSPCA), resulting in five managers being led away in handcuffs. An affidavit documents a pattern of alleged abuses.

For years the Toronto Humane Society used its low 6 percent euthanasia rate as a marketing tool, easily outnumbering other big-city shelters that regularly put down 50 percent or more of the animals they accept.

Julie Morris, senior vice president of Community Outreach for the ASPCA, notes that shelter management usually has good intentions, but it’s easy to get overwhelmed. She also says that some shelters can become so fixated on low euthanasia rates that they begin to overlook suffering.

I understand that with proper management, no-kill shelters play an important role in the community, taking dogs off the street and educating potential adopters. But until every person in the world truly understands the responsibility of pet ownership, we will continue to have more dogs than potential homes. With limited resources, particularly in recent economic times, euthanasia seems like a necessary evil. 

Is the concept of no-kill unrealistic?

News: Guest Posts
Tough Love
Simon Cowell has a heart…for animals

Sometimes it seems like Simon Cowell, the famed curmudgeon judge of American Idol, doesn’t have a kind word for anyone. Well, that’s not entirely the case. When it comes to animals—an old dog, in particular—he’s practically mushy. And he’s gone public (in a video released last night) about his lifelong love for animals to help the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) promote an international campaign for animal welfare. Check it out:

Like many of us, Cowell’s respect for animals came early, while growing up with pets. Drawing on these lessons, he has pledged his support for the WSPA’s Universal Declaration for Animal Welfare—an admirable initiative to persuade governments across the world to embrace international laws that protect animals with the hope of ending animal suffering and cruelty. It’s easy to cast join him.

WSPA is an alliance of more than 900 animal welfare organizations in 150 countries. The declaration calls for, among other goals, recognizing animals as sentient beings, capable of suffering and experiencing pain—an essential baseline for animal welfare progress.

Meanwhile for Cowell, this might be the leading edge of a larger life change. Last night on the Tonight Show, he revealed that he's engaged. Maybe he plans on opening his heart a little more for people now, too.

News: Guest Posts
Animal Abuser Registry
The state of California is considering it

What if there was a public registry of animal abusers just like sex offenders? State Sen. Dean Florez (D-Shafter) of California wants to create the nation's first statewide registry in hopes of preventing future crimes against animals. Written with the input of the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF)--which has campaigned for animal abuser registries in all 50 states--the bill would require a convicted animal abuser to register with the police and submit his address, place of employment and a current photo for an online registry. The specific crime would also be mentioned. Do you think a registry would help deter animal abuse in your community? If so, sign the Expose Animal Abusers petition and it will be forwarded to your state representatives.

News: JoAnna Lou
Breeder v. Shelter
Do you have to choose?

Earlier this week at Westminster, two PETA supporters crashed the Best in Show judging with “Mutts Rule” and “Breeders Kill Shelter Dogs’ Chances” signs, highlighting the breeder-shelter debate.  Yesterday, Sassafras Lowrey blogged about seeing both sides of Westminster, the glamour and the ethics. 

The breeder-shelter debate is a topic that I’ve been conflicted over for a long time.  My Sheltie, Nemo, came from a breeder.  Being my first dog, I opted to go this route for the predictability, both in personality and health.  While genetic testing and breed standards don’t guarantee the dog you get, it certainly increases the chances in your favor.

With millions of animals euthanized in shelters each year, this wasn’t an easy decision.  But, as a supporter of adoption, a shelter pup is not out of the question for the future.  I do believe that there is room for both purebreds and mutts in the canine world.

This week the New York Times debates this topic and has invited Mark Derr (author and The Bark’s own Science Editor), Ted Kerasote (author), Stanley Coren (psychology professor), and Francis Battista (co-founder of Best Friends Animal Society) to weigh in on the issue.

They raise some interesting view points supporting both sides.  Where do you fall in the debate?

News: Karen B. London
Have a Heart for Chained Dogs Week
Because dogs deserve better

The organization Dogs Deserve Better is a national group that advocates for and rescues chained dogs. Their goal is to stop the constant chaining of dogs. While they work towards this end all year long, the week around Valentine’s Day is one of their most prominent periods of activity.

  During this season, they send Valentines to continuously chained dogs. Each Valentine includes a brochure that explains why keeping a dog chained up all the time is a form of abuse and also a coupon for dog food or dog treats. Their goal is to educate people (rather than to accuse them of wrongdoing) so that they will either consider bringing their dog into the house or finding a better home for the dog. Their goal this year is to send Valentines to 15,000 chained dogs. There are many ways to participate in this program.   Some communities have legislation that prohibits chaining dogs constantly by setting limits on the amount of time or the situations in which dogs can be tethered. (For more information about such anti-tethering legislation, check out Alyce Miller’s article, Breaking the Chain, which appeared in The Bark.)

 

News: Guest Posts
Keeping Score
Do your senators and representatives care about animal welfare?

Thirty-nine senators and 54 representatives scored big fat zeros for their “efforts” to protect animals in 2009, according to the latest Humane Scorecard. Every year, the folks at the Humane Society Legislative Fund provide a neat and tidy breakdown of the action on animal welfare measures in the U.S. Congress, which in 2009 included (but wasn’t limited to) lifting the ban on loaded firearms in national parks, phasing out chimpanzees for use in research, and species-labeling for fur. There was no federal legislation relating directly to dogs specifically or companion animals, in general, other than HR 80, which prohibits interstate and foreign commerce in non-human primates for the pet trade—which passed the house last February and was moving through senate committee last summer.

The scorecard is an excellent opportunity to bone up on animal welfare issues at the federal level and to gauge the efforts of your legislators before 36 senators and 435 representatives ask for your vote this fall.
 

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