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Dog's Life: Humane
No Kill Nation
How close are we to achieving this "impossible dream"?
For decades, the dream of a no-kill nation was considered exactly that: a dream. Yet today, communities across the country are closing in on the promise of saving all their healthy and treatable dogs and cats. Almost all organizations in - volved in tracking shelter data, including the Humane Society of the United States and Maddie’s Fund, estimate that the number of animals killed annually in...
Blog: Guest Posts
Dogs of Valor
Four- and three-legged heroes honored
We all know dogs rock. They improve our lives in countless small ways every day—motivating us to be active and patient, making us laugh, helping us in work and play. Sometimes they go an extra mile, saving us from injury and even death. For three years, The Humane Society of the United States has celebrated these ubervaliant pups with the Dogs of Valor Awards. This year’s big winner was Kenai, a...
Dog's Life: Humane
Juliette de Baïracli Levy’s Last Turkuman Hound
Holistic pioneer had a passion for Turkuman Afghans
In her elder years, when Juliette de Baïracli Levy made arrangements to stay with her daughter Luz Lancha de Baïracli Levy in Switzerland, she needed to find a home for her 18-month old Turkuman sighthound, Nuh Belae Turkuman Hennah. She chose a kennel in Switzerland called Daruma’s, owned by sisters Heidi and Iren Roher. In February 1996, Heidi says, “We received a peculiar phone call. A...
Blog: Karen B. London
Lost Wallets
Can your dog’s photo help?
According to a psychology study by Richard Wiseman in Edinburgh, Scotland, the likelihood that your lost wallet will be returned to you is influenced by the photos in it. The highest percentage of wallets were returned when there was a baby picture inside (88 percent), but the next most effective photo was one of a dog at 53 percent. A family portrait prompted a 48% return rate while wallets with...
Blog: JoAnna Lou
National Mutt Census
Mars Veterinary gathers data on American mixed breed pups
The recent popularity of canine DNA breed tests have given those with mixed breeds a chance to learn more about their pups’ backgrounds. There are an estimated 38 million mixed breed dogs in the United States, a large group of canines we know very little about.  This year, Mars Veterinary has launched the 2010 National Mutt Census to systematically collect the data dog lovers have been...
Blog: Karen B. London
Memories of Dogs
First childhood experiences
My parents, who are otherwise absolutely lovely people, are not that fond of animals, so I did not have a dog growing up. The year I was three, we spent one year away from Wisconsin in Palo Alto, California while my professor Dad was on sabbatical. I was ecstatic to learn that an Old English Sheep Dog lived across the street from us. I loved that dog! I used to go over to visit him as often as I...
Take the Quiz! Dog’s Superior Sense of Smell
Questions that test your dog sense.
Take this 6 question quiz and see the results at the end.   Question: As dogs get older, their senses, including sight, hearing and smelling, are diminished.Answer: False. Only sight and hearing, the sense of smell normally stays with a dog for a lifetime.   Question: A dog’s nose print is as individual as a human’s fingerprint. Answer: True. Noses have a pattern of ridges and dimples that,...
Dog's Life: Green
Dog-friendly Yard Work
It’s springtime, the warm weather and longer days give us time to see how our gardens and yards can be made more dog-friendly. One way is to make sure they’re free of plants that might make them sick; another is to add a few small amenities they’ll enjoy more than digging up the flower bed. Here are some ideas from Maureen Gilmer, landscape designer, horticulturalist and dog lover. More can be...
Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Dogs on Grass
Dogs love grass—eating it, rolling on it, playing on it and, unfortunately, “fertilizing” it too
Dogs love grass—eating it, rolling on it, playing on it and, unfortunately, “fertilizing” it too. Urine can cause a nitrogen overload on most grasses, and females, because their squatting produces a steady, concentrated stream, are more likely to create the brown ring pattern on lawns, which some horticulturists call “female dog spot disease.” So if you’re planting—or replanting—a lawn, chose...
Dog's Life: Green
Tips on Dog-Safe Gardening
Garden organically, for the sake of both the planet and your dogs.
Raised beds protect plantings from scampering paws and swinging tails. Dogs can be taught where they’re permitted and where they are not. Digging pit, preferably in shaded locations, give dogs places to practice their excavation skills without disrupting your garden beds. You might entice them to use it by lightly burying (as they watch you) a treat-filled Kong. Leave a plant-free “patrolling”...

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