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Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Cast Your Vote
The polls are closing for the top dogs in pop culture.

In honor of the American Kennel Club’s 125th anniversary, the AKC has teamed up with AOL’s PawNation.com to compile a list of the Top 125 Dogs in Popular Culture decided by pet lovers around the world. There’s just a couple days left before the polls close and the final results will be unveiled on Monday, Dec. 7. From cartoons to literary characters, dog lovers can vote for their favorite pups in the following 11 categories: 

Who is Your Favorite Cartoon Canine?

Who is Your Favorite Dog from TV?

Who is Your Favorite Movie Dog (Part 1)?

Which is Your Favorite Dog in Art or Fashion?

Who is Your Favorite Movie Dog (Part 2)?

Which is Your Favorite Dog Toy?

What is Your Favorite Dog Song?

Who is Your Favorite Advertising Mascot?

Who is Your Favorite College Mascot?

Who is Your Favorite Dog in Literature?

Who is Your Favorite Famous Dog?

Which pop culture pups are your favorites? Some of mine were missing, like Dug from the movie, Up, apparel company Life is Good’s mascot, Rocket, and the canine artwork of Stephen Huneck, who recently made Dog Fancy magazine’s list of 40 Dog People You’ve Gotta Know. Regardless, as a dog lover, I’m always excited to see dogs in artwork or advertisements, so it was fun to see them all recognized in one place.

News: Guest Posts
Ho-Ho-Howl
Send us photos of your holiday pooches!

What makes me such a sucker for dogs in holiday finery? Maybe it’s the early, deep imprint of Max, the Grinch’s eager canine sidekick, tricked out like a reindeer and panting with (momentary) glee as a passenger aboard a sleigh zooming toward Whoville. Halloween, Shmalloween. Give me dogs tearing open packages any day of the year. What says Joy to the World better than a Schnauzer chomping a beribboned bone or a Chihuahua tail-deep in a stocking?

I’m not alone. Every year, I get at least a dozen holiday cards—solstice and Hanukah very much included—featuring dogs, dogs, dogs. Still it’s not enough. I want more. I want to see your holiday pup pictures from formal portraits to dogs passed out in the season’s rubble.

We’ll set the bar with a four-year-old Australian Cattle Dog named Marley (photo, left). Every year, Jeni Hoff of Temecula, Calif., does a little photo session with her dogs for her Christmas card. Although Marley is hard-headed, she says, he seems to enjoy the shoot—“maybe it’s the yummy treats he knows he gets every few pictures.”

“We adopted Marley as a puppy because he was so cute and then learned about the breed (a little backwards) so we had our work cut out for us,” she says. But Hoff knows the ropes. She is a pet sitter (Gotta Love ‘Em! Professional Pet Care), providing in-home care and dog walking for the pets of people on vacation or who work long hours.

Send your holiday canine photos to webeditor@thebark.com (explainer notes welcome), and we’ll feature our favorites in a special yuletide slideshow. DEC. 21 NOTE: Thanks for all the awesome submissions. We've picked our favorites. You'll find them in our 2009 Holiday Pooch Patrol. Enjoy!

News: Guest Posts
Holiday Shopping Tip
Bring Pets Home sprinkles some of your holiday dollars on animal shelters.
I braved my neighborhood mall on Saturday. I found a parking space and never once waited in line. It was sort of spookily mellow. A sign of the recession? Perhaps. Or maybe just a side benefit of savvy Internet shoppers avoiding the anticipated post-Thanksgiving crowds. After all, you can shop many stores—and probably all of the chains—online. I still prefer the bricks-and-mortar world for holiday shopping but a non-profit organization named Bring Pets Home has me rethinking my old-fashioned ways.   Bring Pets Home describes itself as an organization dedicated to helping animals in need, by providing “pet care resources for dog and cat owners” and supporting “animal shelters’ tireless efforts to save homeless animals.” Honestly, this is the first I’ve heard of the group but it launched a shopping initiative that sounds pretty dang good. Here’s how it works: When you shop at one of the participating online “stores”—such as Macy’s, i-Tunes, Sephora, Nordstrom, Wal-Mart, FetchDog, Netflix and tons more—via the Bring Pets Home shopping portal, the stores make a donation to animal shelters. The average appears to be around 4 to 7 percent of the purchase, but I saw as much as 12 percent donated by 1-800-FLOWERS. Shoppers can also register to specify a particular shelter they want to help.   Even if you don’t make a single purchase, you may want to stop by to enter the Bring Pets Home sweepstakes for a chance to win $5,000 for you and $5,000 for the shelter of your choice.   Bring Pets Home claims that it donates 100 percent of the money raised to animal shelters with corporate donations covering 100 percent of operating costs. (I should say, I haven’t verified this independently, and Bring Pets Home isn’t listed on Charity Navigator or the American Institute of Philanthropy.)   Still it looks like a real boon for shelters, and with Cyber Monday—with its attendant incentives and sales—only hours away, the lure of Internet holiday shopping just got a whole lot stronger.

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Collegiate Canines
Petside.com ranks the top 10 pet-friendly schools.

For high school students, the deadline for applying to colleges is quickly approaching. This means many of those students, like I did, will soon have to leave their beloved pets behind to pursue a higher education.

Pets are a big responsibility, particularly for busy college students, but they can be great way to reduce stress and ease homesickness.

Fortunately, more and more colleges are realizing the benefit of allowing students to bring pets on campus. But it’s not easy to find out which schools allow animals, so Petside.com put together a list of the top 10 pet-friendly colleges in the United States. 

The ranking was based on factors such as the type of pets allowed, housing options, required deposits and weight/breed restrictions.

10. Lehigh University - Lehigh Valley, Pa.
9. SUNY Canton - Canton, N.Y.
8. MIT - Boston, Mass.
7. University of Idaho - Moscow, Idaho
6. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Urbana, Ill.
5. Caltech - Pasadena, Calif.
4. Principa College - Saint Louis, Mo.
3. Washington & Jefferson College - Washington, Pa.
2. Stephens College - Columbia, Mo.
1. Eckerd College - Saint Petersburg, Fla.

Unfortunately, not all colleges are as pet friendly as these ten, and of course there are certainly other reasons for choosing a school. But, there are other ways to enjoy the company of animals while away at college. 

When I first arrived on campus, I started an animal shelter volunteer group made up of all the students who missed their pets. We visited the local shelter to help socialize the animals on weekly basis. It was a great way to help out, while getting our pet fix and meeting fellow animal lovers without the responsibility. In fact, I know many people post-college who volunteer to get their pet fix, often limited by non-animal friendly apartments or busy schedules.

There is certainly a risk to allowing animals into bustling dorms. Many college students may not realize the full responsibility of a pet. But as long as there’s a good application process in place, I’m glad that more colleges are accommodating pet lovers. I only wish that I had a list of animal friendly schools when I graduated high school!

What do you think? Should more colleges allow pets in dorms?

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
The Fido Awards
Canine “Oscars” announced.

This past week, the winners of the Fido Awards were announced in London. These are international awards for canine movie stars. As expected the many dogs who played Marley in Marley and Me won in the category of Rom-Com Rover (for romantic comedy companionship) and Beverly Hills Chihuahua took home the award for Comedy Canine.

  This is the third year of the Fido Awards, honoring canine actors and their contribution to entertainment. Many great films this year starred canines deserving of recognition. Among the other films boasting Fido Award winners were The Young Victoria, Up and Paddy. Films honored with a nomination include The Proposal, Bolt, Hotel For Dogs and Inglourious Basterds.   Winners were determined by votes from a panel of British film critics. Fido Awards are yet another sign of the increasing recognition of the value of dogs in our lives.

 

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
What Would You Do To Save Your Dog?
One man fought off a kangaroo.

In Australia, kangaroos can pose a threat to dogs, as one man and his dog experienced first hand over the weekend. The man and his blue Heeler, Rocky, were out for a walk when they surprised a kangaroo that the dog chased into a pond. The kangaroo then turned, caught the dog and held him underwater. Apparently, this is a known defense by kangaroos when being chased by dogs—lead them to water and then attempt to drown them. The man rescued his dog, knowing he could get hurt by the kangaroo, but not expecting to be attacked as severely as he was. Rocky was not far from succumbing to drowning when he was freed, and the man who saved him is in stable condition despite sustaining serious injuries.

This man was courageous in his efforts to save his dog and I admire that. I don’t mean to take away from what he did, but many people would have done the same or at least tried to. Have you ever had to risk your own safety for your dog? Would you?

News: Guest Posts
Dog Lover’s Dream Job?
Denali seeks a kennel manager.

Thirty-one dogs and all the sledding in Alaska’s pristine backcountry that you can handle—plus, a $33,477 to $66,542 salary  and a 25 percent cost of living adjustment: Sound like the career for you? Through November 24, Denali National Park and Preserve is accepting applications for this park ranger position. But be warned, this job is not for the Saturday dog walker and maybe not even for the competitive musher. Former kennel manager Karen Fortier told the Anchorage Daily News, while there’s plenty of beauty and mushing in the work, expect loads of paperwork and management responsibilities.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Why Do You Love Your Pets?
Share your answer with the Texas SPCA.

If you love your dogs so much that you can hardly stop yourself from shouting it from the rooftops, then you are not alone. (Unless you really ARE by yourself on top of your house proclaiming your feelings for them. In that case technically you are alone, but that’s not really the point here.) We humans love our pets so much that it’s easy to go crazy expressing our views.

In recognition of the desire to explain how profoundly we love our pets and why, the Texas SPCA is holding a contest called “Love For All Reasons.” Winners of the contest will have their photo with their pets featured in an online video about the reasons people love their pets.

Check out the contest and consider making a donation to any place that takes care of pets who don’t currently have a home.  Every donation provides opportunities for more animals to experience a love so intense that it takes more than one species to contain it.

So, get off your roof and enter the contest. It’s a much better way to tell the world why you love your dogs. And until then, watch your step up there.

News: Guest Posts
Life with an Autism Service Dog, Part III
Jingle knows her girl.

[Below are excerpts from Michelle O’Neil's blog about her daughter Riley’s autism service dog, which she got earlier this month. In these entries, O’Neil writes about the second half of training at 4 Paws for Ability with Jingle.]

Day 5, Behavior Disruption
Today at training Riley came running in from the kid’s area, crying. She stomped up and down a couple of times and shrieked, “I was trying to tear a picture out of a coloring book, and it ripped, and I crumpled it up and now all my friends are MAD AT ME!!!! WAHHHH!!!!!”

“Riley, why didn’t you ask for help?” I asked.  

That did it.

“I’m not a baaaaaaby!” she wailed.    

I sat her on the mat in front of me and immediately gave Jingle the “lap” command. Jingle sprung to action, she started down by Riley’s knees, and I gave her treats as she inched her way up to Riley’s lap. After the treats, she just stayed there, her body providing deep pressure. I talked to Jingle in a soothing tone, telling her what a good girl she was. Riley started to pet her. We just sat like that, petting Jingle and I could feel Riley’s body start to relax. It didn’t take long, maybe five minutes, definitely less than ten. Then, when she was calm, Riley just got up and marched herself out of the room and back to the play area. We didn’t need to discuss it. She was okay.

This is exactly what we were hoping for.  I sit here trying to think of a pithy ending for this post, but there are no words.

Amen.  

Go to Bed
Last night, we put the kids down in the next room, and my husband, Todd, stood at the door to the bedroom. He looked at Jingle, motioned with his arm toward the door, and said, “Jingle, go to bed!” She hopped up from the floor, ran into the bedroom and jumped up onto Riley’s bed. She stayed with her all night.

She knows who her girl is.

Day 6, Can I pet your dog?
Prior to meeting Jingle, I thought there would be a “mitts off” rule around Riley’s service dog. I imagined myself having to correct adults and children alike, “No, she’s working,” etc.  Some folks receiving service dogs will undoubtedly do just that, but 4 Paws says it is for each client to decide. Chloe, a teen reader of this blog who just got her Asperger’s service dog in August, says it sometimes feels invasive when people approach her dog. I have already been stopped numerous times at the mall by well-meaning people who ask about Jingle. I love introducing her and talking about her but I guess that could get old.

We’re going to have to figure out what feels comfortable for Riley. So far she has been open to it, but we will absolutely let it be her prerogative, and I guess she might feel differently about it on different days. Perhaps we can put an “I’m working” sign on Jingle when Riley doesn’t feel like interacting with people out in public, and take it off when she does.

We made our second trip to the mall today and Jingle was the perfect angel. She held the heel command even when I took her into loud busy stores. She is so smart! She didn’t want me putting the Gentle Leader back on her!  

Riley had another upset today, came in crying from the kid’s area, and we practiced the “over” command again. We got Jingle to put her body over Riley’s lap, and Riley pet her as we praised her. Jingle is definitely motivated by the treats at this point, and not by an altruistic goal to help Riley, but they are bonding more and more with each passing day. Todd is still her sweetheart (full tail wags when he comes in sight), but she’s responding better to me.

Jingle sat on the seat in the car today with her head on Seth’s lap, which thrilled him to no end. We also let him give her the peanut butter filled Kong, but are saving the Pupperonis (doggie crack) for Riley to give. Todd and I are using biscuits for the obedience piece. We are all feeling a little bit more relaxed about the whole thing, and not like we have to get everything perfect, right this minute. It is a process, one that will continue to evolve long after we’ve left 4 Paws and headed back to Cleveland.

Day 7
I know it makes no sense, but when a staff member at 4 Paws showed me a picture she carries of Jingle on her cell phone, and said, “She’s been one of the staff favorites,” I felt such pride! As if I had something to do with her good looks and winning personality.

Jingle is such a good dog! Today we practiced more obedience, and the “touch” command. When a child is upset/crying, the dog is taught to touch them on the leg, “Tap, tap, hello? Look at me kid! Whaddya say we change the subject? Aren’t I cute? Got any treats?”   

We are having to modify the command, because we found out today (thankfully on me) Jingle’s nails are powerful! It’s like she’s digging a rake into your thigh. So, Jingle is only touching Riley’s sneaker for now. We will work on touching the side of her paw, to the side of Riley’s leg, more like a brush with the back of her paw rather than the clawing action she’s got going on now. Jingle is intense. You tell her “touch,” and she wants to do it. With gusto!

“See what a good girl I am? I will really touch like I mean it!”

Ouch!

Yesterday, we watched the dogs practice tethering. It was amazing. The tether strap is attached to the child’s belt, or vest, and the dogs lie on the ground and will not budge. This gives kids with autism so much more freedom out in public. The parents don’t have to constantly hold onto their hands. Riley doesn’t need tethering, but Todd and I both helped by acting as the kids for the training. We tugged and pulled and those sweet dogs, just did what they were trained to do. Even if they were pulled, they stayed in the down position, being dragged slowly across the floor if need be. For those autistic kids who are escape artists, it is like lugging a 50-100 pound weight depending on the dog. It really slows them down. All of the dogs have had basic training in tethering but we were fine-tuning. Tethering is going to open up the world for these families.  

Day 8
Jingle peed in the elevator! She got so scared, it just kinda happened, even though she had gone potty on the way into the mall. I’ve not spent so much time in a mall since I was a teenager with permed hair working at the Oakdale Mall in Johnson City, NY. I was sixteen, blowing all my money on clothes and hair products. Ah, those were the days.

Wait, where was I? Ah yes, Jingle peed.

Even though she is a well-trained dog, there are always going to be situations she is unfamiliar with. She is not a robot. She is a dog, and she has fears and feelings. This is why it is important to get her out as much as possible, in as many situations as we can while we are here, and after we go home. The great thing about Jingle is she’s a quick learner. First time in this particular elevator, she pees. Second time. She was fine. She was scared of a certain set of stairs at the mall too, but we went over them just a couple of times and she did much better.

We’re back at the hotel now, chilling out. The kids are watching Arthur, and Jingle is snoozing on her Mutt Matt. The Mutt Matt is Jingle’s “place.” A “place” is a little rug or matt the dog uses when put in a stay-type mode. It is the spot she will stay on in class if she goes to school. The “place” command is a stay command. They are allowed to move around, stand, stretch, but they have to keep at least two paws on the matt. Jingle will push it, she will be completely off the matt with just her two hind paws on the outside seam, but she’s technically still on her “place,” so we can’t get on her. If Jingle has been put in a “place” command she has to stay for as long as we tell her, until we give her the “free” command.  It can be minutes or hours. All of the dogs understand “place” and it is incredible how they stay on those matts, even if someone deliberately drops a treat a few feet away to test them.

It will never cease to amaze me how you can have 13 dogs in one room, all of them behaving.

Day 9
Today we worked on more obedience and went over many possible scenarios that might play out when we get home, like meeting other dogs. Then, Jeremy the trainer put the fear of God in us about a condition called gastric torsion, which can happen if a dog gulps down its food too fast and then runs around playing wildly after a meal. What happens is the food sits like a huge heavy lump in the dog’s stomach, and then when they get running around, the stomach can flip, twisting the tubes where the esophagus and the small intestine connect to it, creating gas build up and bloat. Jeremy lost a beloved German Shepherd to the condition and his main reason in scaring us half to death was to drive home the point, “Listen to your intuition if you think something is wrong with your dog.” His vet blew off his concerns.

Hmm….a doctor blowing off a “parent’s” concerns. Sounds vaguely familiar.

Listen to your Inner Guidance. Got it. Absolutely. Will do.

Tomorrow is the big test. If Jingle passes she is officially our service dog and we can take her home! She’ll be at the mall with Todd (since between the two of us she loves him best) demonstrating all the commands. She’ll be walking through crowded stores, dealing with strangers, navigating the food court, sitting under a table, heeling, sitting, staying down. She’ll be doing the elevator again (please don’t pee Jingle or you won’t pass)! Todd has to demonstrate he can handle her well.

Yes, she loves Todd, but she knows who her girl is. Any time Riley comes near her the tail goes wild, and today at training Riley crossed the room on her way to the bathroom and Jingle never took her eyes off of her. She watched the bathroom door until Riley came out and watched her again as she walked all the way back to the play area.

So, if all goes well, tomorrow we head home … and Jingle meets the cats. Insert scary music.

Pray for us.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Dog Halloween Costumes
Scary for our four-legged friends

It’s hard to resist the urge to put dogs in costumes. The cuteness factor can fly off the charts, and for many people, dressing up our dogs is as natural as dressing up our human children. Despite my recognition of the joy it can bring to see our pups parading around as cowgirls, devils, sports stars or Elvis, I urge caution when considering costumes for dogs.

Most dogs hate costumes. They easily become stressed and uncomfortable when wearing clothing, especially anything on the head or around the body. In the picture with this blog, the dog dressed up as a quarterback looks tense, with the closed mouth so indicative of a dog who is not comfortable, and he seems frozen in angst. In contrast, the dog behind him, sans costume, has a happy face and a relaxed body. I took this photo at a dog camp where all over the room on dress up night I saw unhappy dogs in costumes and cheerful dogs in their birthday suits.

If you simply must have your dog participate in this holiday, costumes that don’t impair dogs’ movements are best. Since most dogs are accustomed to wearing collars, small costumes that consist of something around the neck are the most easily tolerated. The key word is “small.” Rather than dress a dog up in a full tuxedo, for example, having him sport just a small bow tie may be easier for your dog to handle. This can be a great compromise that works for both people and dogs.

Costumes that dogs barely notice are great options. My dog was a skunk for Halloween one year. Being all black, the entire costume consisted of baby powder applied in a strip down his back—cute, easy and not bothersome to him. (Some dogs may even object to baby powder, but mine was fine with it.)

Even better is what my aunt used to tell trick-or-treaters about her dog Nellie who was a cross between a Beagle and a Lab: “What do you think of my cat’s costume? Doesn’t she look exactly like a dog?” My aunt could then have her dog take part in the spirit of the holiday without any ill effects. The older kids gave a little laugh, but the littlest kids were awed by Nellie’s “costume.”

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