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Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Halloween Dog Safety Tips

With Halloween’s ghosts, goblins and treats around the corner the good folks at the ASPCA Pro have these important safety tips for us:

1. Lock candy safely away.

Kids love to stash candy in their rooms, but a dog’s keen sense of smell will lead him to even the most cleverly hidden treasure. Contact a veterinary professional right away if your pet does get into Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or is sugar-free and contains xylitol.

2.  Don’t leave glow sticks lying around.

Glow sticks are used to help keep kids safe while they are out in the dark. Pets (especially cats) find these glow sticks to be a lot of fun as well, and we commonly get calls about pets puncturing the sticks. While most of them are labeled as non-toxic, they do have an extremely bitter taste and we will often see pets who bite into them drooling and racing around the house. A little treat or sip of milk will usually stop the taste reaction.

3. Keep your pet identified and visible.

There are a lot of extra people on the streets at Halloween, and that combined with strange costumes can spook pets and cause them to bolt. If you take your pet out after dark, make sure he or she wears a reflective collar and is securely leashed. And make sure your pet has proper identification on the collar.

4. Calm your pet.

Even pets who are kept indoors may experience intense anxiety over the large number of strangely dressed visitors. Keeping your pet away from trick-or-treaters may do the trick, but if you think more will be needed be sure and speak with your vet well in advance about options to help calm your pet.

5. Check those costumes.

Costumes can be fun for the whole family. If you are planning on dressing up your best bud, ensure that the costume fits well and isn't going to slip and tangle the pet or cause a choking hazard if chewed on. Never leave a costumed pet unattended.

Good Dog: Studies & Research
How Do Dogs Know We Are Coming Home?

One of the best things about living with dogs is the unbridled joy with which they greet us every time we come home—no matter how long we’ve been away. It has long been thought, and oftentimes documented, that dogs have a sixth sense that allows them to “know” our ETA in advance. Just how do they do it?

In Alexandra Horowitz’s new book, Being a Dog, she offers what seems to be a very reasonable explanation. It isn’t that they can smell us from afar or hear our footsteps or the car motor. Rather, as she writes, “there was a potent combination of two forces leading to these dogs’ abilities. The first is the distinctness of our smell to our dogs. The second is the ease with which dogs learn our habits.”

As she goes on to say, “It might be that the odors that we leave around the house when we leave lessen in a consistent amount each day.” Basically, our smarty dogs’ amazing noses know that “over the hours we are gone, our home begins to smell less of us.” 

She tested this theory by recruiting a colleague to sneak one of her partner’s stinky t-shirts into the house hours after her partner left, once again infusing the house with his odor. And yes, the ruse seemed to work. That day, their dog, who had reliably demonstrated that he knew when his person was nearing home, was found snoring on the couch.

Dog's Life: Home & Garden
Designer Tips From A Leading Expert
Home Design Tips for Dog People
Designer Tips From Vern Yip

When Vern Yip talks style, we listen. Not only is he a multi-talented fabric and accessory designer and an HGTV Design Star judge with multiple seasons under his fashionable belt, he and his family share their Atlanta home with big dogs. Following are a few fieldtested pointers. For more decorating advice, pick up a copy of his new book, Vern Yip’s Design Wise: Your Smart Guide to a Beautiful Home, from Running Press. 

• While I prefer the idea of a comfy dog bed with a great-looking, washable cover next to the main seating area, if you want your dog on the sofa, go for a low-maintenance, stain-resistant indoor/outdoor fabric or distressed leather. Many leathers scratch easily, so it’s best to avoid anything with too fine a finished surface. (Washable slipcovers also work in these instances, but staying on top of keeping them laundered does add to the chore list.)

• Does your dog sleep in your bed? If so, avoid dry-clean-only fabrics for duvets and decorative bedding items. Sending bedding out to the dry cleaner with any frequency can get expensive. Alternatively, place a dog bed alongside your bed. Having multiple dog beds throughout your home is a great way to keep your canine companions with you but off the furniture.

• To keep your house looking clean, go for rugs and upholstery with patterns, which tend to hide dirt and hair better than solids.

• If you have tall dogs with long tails or active dogs who run through your rooms, secure your easily damaged decorative items with museum wax. Museum wax can be purchased online and in many hardware stores, and doesn’t permanently stick to surfaces. However, objects secured with it won’t move until you intentionally sever the bond. Test a bit of the museum wax in an inconspicuous spot to be sure it won’t harm whatever surface you’re working with.

• Select furniture that goes all the way to the floor or has taller legs, which will allow you to see under the piece. Dog hair is notorious for traveling everywhere; when your sofas and chairs are on small, low-profile, block legs, it’s easy to miss all the hair that collects underneath, and vacuuming it up means moving the furniture.

• Is your dog a drooler? If so, avoid silk for upholstery, curtains or any other material surface. Silk is a beautiful home décor fabric but it does stain.

• When you refinish wood floors, choose a durable product such as Bona Traffic, a waterborne commercial and residential hardwood floor finish, to help ward off claw dings.

• Consider carpeting your stairs or installing a runner. Smooth surfaces such as wood, stone and tile may be easy for your dog to negotiate when he’s younger but can cause problems as he ages. Carpet not only protects your steps, it also provides dogs with reassuring extra traction.

• Putting in a tiled floor? Use bigger tiles to minimize grout joints. Tile is wonderfully hard wearing, but grout can become stained, dirty or damaged; smaller grout joints (¹/₁₆-inch is ideal) help keep that to a minimum. Fewer and smaller grout joints are also beneficial if your dog has an accident, since grout tends to be porous.

Wellness: Health Care
Seven Step DIY Dog Checkup
Learn how to do at-home physical exams
Learn how to do at-home physical exams

To identify a problem or an abnormal situation, you must first be able to recognize what’s normal for your dog. Performing this exam in the comfort of your home when your dog’s in good shape is the best way to do this. Consult your veterinarian if you’re concerned about any exam finding; early recognition can save your dog’s life.

Before you start the exam, take a good look at your dog when she’s just hanging out; observe her posture and general demeanor. Getting a good picture of your dog’s “normal” in a relaxed environment will help you pick up any subtle changes that may occur.

1. Take her temperature. Using a digital rectal thermometer (the ear type is less reliable, and mercury thermometers can break), lubricate the end with petroleum jelly and gently insert it into the rectum, about 1 inch for small dogs and about 2 inches for larger ones. If it does not slide in easily, do not force it. A normal temperature is between 100º and 102.5º F.

2. Check her heart rate by taking her pulse at the femoral artery, which you’ll find on the inside of her thigh; feel for the roll of the artery and a pulsing sensation. Count the number of pulses in 15 seconds and multiply by four. A dog’s pulse rate is highly variable, but generally, normal is 80 to 120 beats per minute. Relaxed, large-breed or athletic dogs tend to have slower rates, while the rate for puppies and small dogs tends to be higher.

3. Start at her head. Nose: smooth, soft and clean, like supple leather (noses aren’t necessarily always cool or moist). Eyes: bright, moist and clear, with pupils equal in size; the whites should be white, with only a few visible blood vessels. Ears: clean and dry, almost odor-free; you should be able to gently massage them without complaint. Mouth: teeth clean and white, gums uniformly pink and moist to the touch.

4. Watch her chest as she breathes. The chest wall should move in and out easily and rhythmically in an effortless way; each breath should look the same as the last. (Unless she’s panting, you should not be able to hear your dog breathe.) A normal resting respiration rate is 15 to 30 breaths per minute; a sleeping or relaxed dog would be near the low end, while an active and engaged dog would be higher. As with heart rates, smaller dogs tend to have a faster resting breathing rate than larger dogs.

5. Examine her skin. One of the body’s major organs and an important indicator of overall health, the skin of a healthy dog is soft and unbroken, with minimal odor and—except for wirehaired breeds—the hair coat is shiny and smooth.

6. Check her hydration with the skin turgor test. Pull the skin over her neck or back into a “tent” and release; it should return quickly to its original position. If it returns slowly, or remains slightly tented, your dog may be dehydrated.

7. Finish up with the torso. Starting just behind the ribs, gently press your hands into your dog’s belly; if she’s just eaten, you may feel an enlargement in the left part of the belly just under the ribs (where the stomach lives), which can be normal. Proceed toward the rear of her body, passing your hands gently over the entire area. Lumps, bumps or masses; signs of discomfort; or distention of the belly warrant further investigation by your vet.

For a more detailed discussion of the in-home exam thebark.com/exam and see Dr. Shea Cox on bridgevs.com

Dog's Life: Travel
Dog-Friendly Off-Leash Federal Lands
National Conservation Lands
Dog-Friendly Off-Leash Federal Lands

National Conservation Lands protect 32 million acres of this country’s most ecologically rich and culturally significant landscapes. Each is different, not only in terrain but also in history. These lands are made up of National Monuments and National Conservation Areas and similar designations, Wilderness and Wilderness Study Areas, Wild and Scenic Rivers, and National Scenic and Historic Trails.

They are overseen by the Bureau of Land Management and, unlike other public lands, such as those administered by the National Park Service, they have a much more tolerant policy about off-leash dogs.

There are more than 30 sites in the western states in which you and your dog can freely explore. It’s important to note that while dogs need to be on-leash in developed areas and campgrounds, generally, they are not required by law to be leashed in the backcountry. However, in some regions, for their own safety, dogs should be under leash control; hunting and fishing are allowed on most of these lands, more reason to keep the safety of your dog in mind. Be sure to follow the rules at each individual park, and—of course—to pick up and pack out your dog’s waste.

 

Alaska

Steese National Conservation Area

 

Arizona

Agua Fria National Monument

Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area

Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument

Ironwood Forest National Monument

Las Cienegas National Conservation Area

San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area

Sonoran Desert National Monument

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument

 

California

Fort Ord National Monument

Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument

Carrizo Plain National Monument

King Range National Conservation Area

Mojave Trails National Monument

Piedras Blancas Outstanding Natural Area

Sand To Snow National Monument

Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument

 

Colorado

Browns Canyon National Monument

Dominguez-Escalante National Conservation Area

Gunnison Gorge National Conservation Area

McInnis Canyons National Conservation Area

 

Nevada

Basin and Range National Monument

Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area

 

New Mexico

El Malpais National Conservation Area

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument

Prehistoric Trackways National Monument

Rio Grande del Norte National Monument

Fort Stanton-Snowy River Cave National Conservation Area: the cave is off-limits to all but scientists. Around the Fort and backcountry trails are fine.

 

Oregon

Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

 

Washington

San Juan Islands National Monument

Fall is a great time to visit. For a complete listing of dog-friendly National Conservation Lands, see conservationlands.org

Wellness: Health Care
Vaping is Dangerous for Dogs
Vaping is Dangerous for Dogs

E-cigarettes, the latest thing in nicotine delivery systems, pose a significant threat to dogs. These devices vaporize a liquid mix of glycerin, propylene glycol, nicotine, and flavorings; in states where marijuana is legal, THC may be among the ingredients. The liquid, often called e-juice, comes in flavors such as cinnamon gummy bear, cotton candy and cloudberry, and dogs are attracted to the sweetness.

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center includes cigarettes and nicotine on its list of poisonous household products, and warns that e-juice used to recharge device cartridges contains enough nicotine to kill a dog. Symptoms of nicotine poisoning include severe vomiting, depression, an elevated heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, seizures and respiratory failure.

Ahna Brutlag, DVM, MS, DABT, DABVT and associate director of veterinary services at Pet Poison Helpline, says, “We’ve handled cases for pets poisoned by eating traditional cigarettes or tobacco products containing nicotine for many years, but, as the use of e-cigarettes has become more widespread, our call volume for cases involving them has increased considerably.” According to the Pet Poison Helpline, not only are the ingredients dangerous (depending on the dog’s weight and metabolism, symptoms can occur between 15 and 60 minutes after ingestion) but also, the plastic e-cigarette casing and e-juice containers can injure the dog’s mouth.

If you suspect that your dog has consumed these or other poisonous substances, call your vet, local animal hospital or poison hotline immediately.

As the Pet Poison Helpline notes, “Home care is not generally possible with nicotine exposure due to the severity of poisoning, even in small doses.” Keeping these devices and refill containers out of dogs’ reach is always the best course of action.

Dog's Life: Humane
Make-A-Wish Helps Child Fulfill Dog Park Dream
Anna's Dog Park

Most Make-A-Wish Foundation requests involve traveling to places like Disney World or Paris, or meeting celebrities. But Anna Getner, a sixth-grader at Middlebrook School in Wilton, Conn., had a different dream in mind.

The 11-year-old, who completed an 821-day long treatment regimen for leukemia earlier this year, told Make- A-Wish Connecticut that she wanted to create a puppy playroom at PAWS, her local animal shelter. She had a very specific vision: a place where dogs would feel comfortable and could meet potential adopters in a pleasant setting. Make-A-Wish worked with local business, volunteers and other supporters eager to help make the space a reality.

Anna’s Dog Park was unveiled in February with a party that included Anna, her friends and family, classmates, teachers, and many others. Norwalk mayor Harry Rilling issued a proclamation celebrating Anna’s generosity and kind spirit.

According to Anna, her rescue pup, Franklin, played a big role in her choice of wishes. She wanted all animals at PAWS to find their forever homes and give others as much joy as Franklin has given her.

Pam Keogh, president of Make-A-Wish Connecticut, says that Anna’s request was a first. The chapter has fulfilled 2,500 wishes in the last 30 years, but Keogh doesn’t know of any quite like Anna’s. Local pet food company Blue Buffalo was so inspired by Anna’s selfless decision that it not only helped fund the project, but also announced that it will donate food to PAWS for life.

Mission accomplished: happy rescue pups and, finally, some joy for a girl who has spent way too much time in a hospital.

Dog's Life: Lifestyle
Top 5 Beach Dangers for Dogs

While beaches are a great place for pets to cool off, get some exercise and play, there are some important precautions to take to keep pets safe, even at beaches designated specifically for dogs.  Included below are five of the top beach dangers for dogs, along with tips for keeping your dog safe from Trupanion.

1. Sun burns – You may not realize it, but even dogs can get sun burns. Their noses, bellies, and areas with particularly thinner fur are susceptible to the sun’s hot rays so it’s important to protect your pooch. Provide shade with a beach umbrella and consider dog-friendly sunscreen. (Many sunscreens made for humans can be toxic to dogs. Be sure to avoid sunscreen with mineral Zinc Oxide which can harmful to your pup.) Also consider looking into doggy sun goggles to protect your pooch’s eyes from harmful rays.

2. Salt water – Your pup may be inclined to lap up the salty ocean water if he’s thirsty, but the salt, bacteria and parasites in the water can make them sick. Prevent your dog from drinking salt water by providing plenty of fresh water. It’s also important not to let the salt water dry on their fur since it can irritate their skin. Be sure to give your pup a good rinse off with fresh water when he’s done swimming.

3. Seaweed and sea creatures – While exploring the beach you may come across washed up sea life and other items. Keep a close eye on your dog to prevent him from rolling in or eating anything that could make him sick. Some areas also have higher danger of sea creatures like jellyfish so be sure to keep a close watch on the surrounding waters to keep your pet safe.

4. Hot sand – If the sand is too hot for you to walk barefoot, then it’s too hot for your pup’s paw pads. Save your beach trip for a cooler day or go in the early morning or late evening to avoid the heat.

5. Big waves – Your dog may be a strong swimmer, but large rolling waves can be very dangerous. You might choose to keep your dog on a leash so that he can’t go out too far, or purchase a dog life jacket in case he gets too tired swimming.

News: Guest Posts
Free the Animal, Don’t get Sued

Last month Ohio passed a law making it legal for a good samaritan to break their way into a locked vehicle saving a heat-stroked animal. It joins a small list of states—Florida, New York, Tennessee, and Wisconsin—that grant this kind of legal immunity to do-gooders.

While 22 states have laws that specifically make it illegal to leave a dog trapped in a hot car, the actions that a passerby can legally take are less than intuitive. If a woman walking down the street spots a Basset Hound locked in a hot car, she should be able to do whatever necessary to save the pup and not worry about getting sued for breaking a piece of glass. But the “not getting sued” part is where things get tricky.

The nitty-gritty of the law differs from state to state—in some states only an animal control or police officer can break the window; in others, any concerned citizen can do it under pressing circumstances. In New Jersey and West Virginia though, no one, not even animal control, can legally free a dying dog. Even though it is illegal in those states to leave a dog in a hot car, according to the letter of the law anyone who saves the dog could get slapped with criminal charges. It’s time to revisit that one, dear lawmakers.

The idea here is not to go around smashing windows of course, unless it is absolutely necessary. Here is the Humane Society of the U.S. list of the very first steps you should take if you see an animal in distress in a parked car.

  • Take down the car's make, model and license-plate number.
  • If there are businesses nearby, notify their managers or security guards and ask them to make an announcement to find the car's owner. Many people are unaware of the danger of leaving pets in hot cars and will quickly return to their vehicle once they are alerted to the situation.
  • If the owner can't be found, call the non-emergency number of the local police or animal control and wait by the car for them to arrive.
  • In several states good samaritans can legally remove animals from cars under certain circumstances, so be sure to know the laws in your area and follow any steps required.

That last point brings us to the demystification section of this article. It is important to know the laws in your state. Below is a very simple overview of who can use reasonable force, aka break a window, when they encounter an animal locked inside a hot car. If you live in a state where everyday citizens are granted this action, be sure to click on the “guidelines” link to read about the required steps you must take in order to avoid legal trouble. 

 

*The definition of “Animal” also varies from state to state. Are we talking dogs, cats, or lizards here? All information is current as of June 2016. If you’re in the position of needing to take action and have any questions, consult The Animal Legal Defense Fund

Alabama
 Nobody

Louisiana
Nobody

Ohio
 Effective Aug. 29 2016
Good Samaritans
Guidelines

Alaska
Nobody

Maine
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Oklahoma
Nobody

Arizona
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Maryland
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Oregon
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Arkansas
Nobody

Massachusetts
Nobody

Pennsylvania
Nobody

California
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Michigan
Nobody

Rhode Island
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

 

Colorado
Nobody

 

Minnesota
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

South Carolina
Nobody

Connecticut
Nobody

Mississippi
Nobody

South Dakota
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Delaware
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Missouri
Nobody

Tennessee
Good Samaritans
Guidelines

D.C.
Nobody

Montana
Nobody

Texas
Nobody

Florida
Good Samaritans
Guidelines

Nebraska
Nobody

Utah
Nobody

Georgia
Nobody

Nevada
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Vermont
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Hawaii
Nobody

New Hampshire
|Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Virginia
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Idaho
Nobody

New Jersey
Nobody

Washington
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

Illinois
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

New Mexico
Nobody

West Virginia
Nobody

Indiana
Nobody

New York
Good Samaritans
 Guidelines

Wisconsin
Good Samaritans
Guidelines

Iowa
Nobody

North Carolina
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc

 

Wyoming
Nobody

Kansas
Nobody North Dakota
Law Enforcement or
Animal Control Officer, etc   Kentucky
Nobody     *The definition of “Animal” also varies from state to state. Are we talking dogs, cats, or lizards here? All information is current as of June 2016.  If you’re in the position of needing to take action and have any questions, consult The Animal Legal Defense Fund

A gentle reminder to all of us pet lovers: be vigilant, but don’t be overzealous. We all want what’s best for the animals. Imagine you’re moving across the country with your cat and you leave her in the car with the AC on at a rest stop while you run in to buy her a bottle of water. You return to your car two minutes later to find your window smashed and your terrified kitty in the arms of a total stranger. It goes without saying: this isn’t why these laws exist and it isn’t what we’re going for.

We’re going for social responsibility on all fronts. 

Thank you for caring for the animals of all shapes and sizes in our world. Have you had any personal experiences rescuing an animal?

I’ll be keeping an eye on the comments and am looking forward to the conversation!

News: Guest Posts
How to Pet-Proof Your Garden

Having a pet that enjoys spending time in the garden requires a two-pronged security strategy: on the one hand, the garden needs protecting from the pet, but your pet will also need to be protected from the garden. Some plants and fertilizers, for example, can be poisonous – with the latter, it’s best to check the label, but also to cross-reference the contents online. In general, organic fertilizers such as manure, compost, or seaweed are safer, non-toxic options. See this nifty infographic for more dog proofing garden tips.


How to Pet-Proof Your Garden – An infographic by HomeAdvisor

 

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