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Blog: Guest Posts
Study Dogs Sought
For study of canine compulsive behavior
The Animal Behavior Clinic at Tufts University is currently enrolling:   Terriers (except Bull breeds) German Shepherds Border Collies   into a study regarding the genetic underpinnings of compulsive behavior. Dogs that are affected and unaffected are needed. You will be required to fill out a survey about your dog’s behavior and a blood sample will be taken. A visit to Tufts is not required. If...
Blog: Editors
“Blowing” Off Mosquitoes
Fans can provide relief from summer stingers
No one likes mosquitoes. And since only one bite from an infected one can spread heartworm in our dogs, we have to be doubly aware of how to prevent being bitten by them. The New York Times had an interesting piece that looked at the effectiveness of using wind—in the form of a fan—to deter flying pests from landing on you or on your dog. What makes the fan an effective deterrent is that it “...
Blog: Editors
Therapeutic Trees
Another health bonus from walking your dog
The New York Times had an interesting article about studies examining the health benefits of nature. Researchers have found that spending time in places with trees aplenty, such as parks and forests, is good for us and has a positive affect on our immune functions. Seems as if stress reduction is one factor that the scientists attribute to phytnocides, the “airborne chemicals that plants emit to...
Blog: Karen B. London
Getting a Leg Up
Three-legged dogs inform robot design
Many three-legged dogs walk and run quite well, and people who build robots want to know how. They want to model robots on dogs who are missing limbs so that in the event of damage, these robots will still be capable of moving. It makes sense to be prepared for the unexpected, and studying the way dogs move may make it possible.   By comparing the gaits of dogs with three legs to those of the...
Blog: JoAnna Lou
Dating with Dogs
One in 14 people have used their pet to attract a mate
Dogs are social by nature, so it’s no surprise that our pets help us make connections with our fellow humans. Dog parks and pet lover dating web sites have become popular places to meet new friends and even spark romantic relationships. Recently statistics web site, the Book of Odds, calculated the chances that a person has ever used his or her pet to attract a new mate as one in 14.29. This...
Blog: Guest Posts
Thumbs Down on Store-bought Dogs
New poll finds Americans prefer shelters to stores
Good news for shelter dogs and cats: More than half of pet owners to respond to an Associated Press-Petside.com poll said “they would get their next dog or cat from a shelter, nearly seven times the number who said they would buy their next pet from a store.” About a quarter said they would seek out a breeder for their next pet.   The telephone poll conducted April 7-12, 2010, with 1,112 pet...
Blog: Karen B. London
Only the Good Die Young
Science doesn't back that up
According to a recent study, The Pace of Life Under Artificial Selection: Personality, Energy Expenditure, and Longevity Are Correlated in Domestic Dogs, there is a link between personality, metabolic rate, and life history traits. Researcher Vincent Careau and his colleagues conclude that dogs of obedient, docile and shy breeds live longer than breeds that are more typically bold or disobedient...
Blog: JoAnna Lou
Collaborate for a Cure
New study aims to use doggy DNA to understand cancer.
The Translational Genomics Research Institute and the Van Andel Research Institute, in partnership with the National Cancer Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, and Michigan State University, have created the Canine Hereditary Cancer Consortium to better understand cancer in dogs and humans.  The research features an unprecedented collaboration of veterinarians, scientists, research...
Blog: Karen B. London
Visual Versus Vocal Cues
Dogs watch us and we talk to them
There’s a little list in my mind of information that dog trainers know and that they wish everyone knew. At the top of that list is the fact that dogs primarily communicate with visual signals whereas humans most often express themselves vocally. This difference explains so much of the confusion between our otherwise largely compatible species.   Dogs often pick up on visual cues that we use,...
Blog: Guest Posts
Cats 1, Dogs 0
Study links asthma risk to dogs, not cats
I feel like I have a built-in radar for dog versus cat stories. Or rather, I’m sort of a magnet for them. I know it drives some Bark readers crazy—those who don’t feel a need to make comparisons and think I should stop feeding the feud. Well, if you are such a high-minded egalitarian read no further. If you’re with me (and keeping score), add a hash mark to the “Cat’s rule” side of the ledger.  ...

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