Browsing articles in book reviews
News: Guest Posts
State of Wonder and Bookstores
Beth Finke meets Bark contributor and fan, Ann Patchett
Harper and I made sure to hobble in early. I alerted the strangers who joined us at our table that there was a dog underneath, and when one of them lifted the tablecloth to have a look, she said, “Oh, a black Lab. How sweet!” My Seeing Eye dog is a male yellow Labrador Retriever. She’d mistaken the behemoth black cast on my foot for Harper. We were at the Women’s Athletic Club on Michigan...
Culture: Reviews
Don’t Dump the Dog: Outrageous Stories and Simple Solutions to Your Worst Dog Behavior Problems
Skyhorse Publishing, 240 pp., 2009; $14.95
Randy Grim, founder of Stray Rescue of St. Louis (strayrescue.org), started his canine-focused career by driving around East St. Louis every morning before work, searching for feral dogs and spending weeks taming them. From those early years came an acclaimed book, The Man Who Talks to Dogs, coauthored with writer Melinda Roth. Now Grim and Roth have collaborated on another book—one that sent...
Culture: Reviews
Last Dog on the Hill: The Extraordinary Life of Lou
St. Martin’s Press; $24.99
Adding to the long (and growing) list of dog-related memoirs, Steve Duno’s Last Dog on the Hill: The Extraordinary Life of Lou tells the story of a dog who truly is extraordinary. Lou saves the lives of people and dogs, takes down criminals, and has a profound impact on just about every creature with whom he comes in contact. Fate, if one believes in such things, plays a central role in Last Dog...
Culture: Reviews
You Had Me at Woof: How Dogs Taught Me the Secrets of Happiness
When Julie Klam was 30 years old, single and living in a tiny New York City studio apartment, she rescued a Boston Terrier and named him Otto. Initially described to her as a dog who just needed a little love—evoking images of “the dog version of the Charlie Brown Christmas Tree”—Otto helped Klam grow up, figure herself out and embrace responsibility. In what the author refers to as her “...
Culture: Reviews
Nose Down, Eyes Up
Villard, 320 pp., 2008; $24
It's always "beer-thirty" for Gill, the underemployed commitment-phobe at the center of Merrill Markoe’s new novel, Nose Down, Eyes Up. Launched by his own stunning lack of maturity and a dog-ona- mission named Jimmy, Gil ricochets through a tidy plot that has him bouncing like a pinball between his longtime girlfriend Sara, a well-meaning animal communicator, and his ex-wife Eden, “a sexual...
Culture: Reviews
Dog Sense
How the New Science of Dog Behavior Can Make You a Better Friend to Your Pet
Dog Sense - Bradshaw
Dogs and wolves may have more than 99 percent of their DNA in common, but when it comes to understanding dogs, John Bradshaw says it does them an injustice to look to wolves as models. Not only did domestication have a profound impact, but also, many early wolf studies were carried out on groups of unrelated animals forced together in artificial environments, which resulted in behaviors not...
News: Karen B. London
Theo Is The Cover Dog!
“Love Has No Age Limit”
Chosen from over 700 photos, this picture of Theo will be on the cover of “Love Has No Age Limit,” the new booklet that Patricia McConnell and I are writing about adopting adult and adolescent dogs.   Theo is a rescue dog who was found as a stray on a highway in New Jersey. He then spent three months in a shelter before being adopted by Kimberly Wang of Eardog Productions in New York. She saw a...
Culture: Reviews
Walking the Talk
Two new books reveal worlds expanded by dogs
Small Furry Prayer  Dog Walks Man
Last year, more dog-centric books were published than at any time in history, it seems. One in particular stood out, earning high praise both from us and many other reviewers: Gail Caldwell’s masterful Let’s Take the Long Way Home. Like many of the current books, it’s a memoir, but unlike most of them, it’s not really about dogs, but rather about a friendship in which a shared love for dogs...
News: Karen B. London
Dog Book Recommendations For All
What titles do you pass on to friends?
My sister recently requested a few suggestions for dog books to read because this month, the theme for her book club is pets.   Her book club has the world’s coolest system for choosing what to read. You can sum up their strategy with the phrase, “Every woman for herself!” because each member chooses a different book to read. Choices are organized around themes, such as banned books, band books,...
Culture: Reviews
Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell and Know
Scribner, 368 pp., 2009; $26
If we want to get inside of a dog’s mind, to know how it feels to be that dog, then we must first understand how he sees his subjective universe, or “umvelt.” This is the premise of Alexandra Horowitz’s nearly flawless book, Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell and Know.   Groucho Marx once quipped,“Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.” Horowitz...