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Culture: Reviews
Book Review: The Canine Kingdom of Scent
Dogwise Publishing
The Canine Kingdom of Scent

In this mini-manual, author and trainer Anne Lill Kvam outlines her personal method of training fun nosework exercises in a precise, step-by-step process.

Amongst her list of scent-work activities for dogs, readers will find confidence- building exercises and downright festive dog fun with games such as Hide and Seek, Naming Your Dog’s Toys, Finding Lost Objects and Kvam’s version of scent discrimination. The lessons progress from simple to more complex in a clearly chronicled succession.

Kvam begins with a description of canine scenting ability in relation to our own, which helps the reader recognize and conceptualize the fantastic capacity of the canine olfactory sense. As the book progresses, you’ll find positive- reinforcement training basics and a detailed description of how to personalize your dog’s reward options, all of which build a useful foundation for the detailed training exercise plans that follow. The emphasis on stress management and calm concentration on the part of both dog and handler are reiterated throughout the book, as is the essential need to recognize each dog’s individual set of motivators.

The information delivered is clear enough to allow nosework newcomers and novices to jump right into training with minimal equipment and preparation, and even more-seasoned dog handlers may find some useful suggestions for their existing nosework training plans. Readers planning on branching out into specific sports or other formalized activities should review those rules and exercises to be sure Kvam’s style of training complements their particular program. Overall, an excellent and accessible starter for anyone interested in beginning-level and fun nosework activities with their companion dog.

Culture: Reviews
Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us About Health and the Science of Healing
Alfred A. Knopf, 2012
Zoobiquity - Book Review

Humans aren’t the only ones to suffer from eating disorders, heart disease, addictions and many other ailments. In Zoobiquity, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and journalist Kathryn Bowers examine the range of diseases and conditions that commonly afflict both people and other animals, including dogs.

Horowitz’s revelation that species-spanning commonalities exist was sparked when she was called to the LA Zoo to help a female Emperor tamarin (an adorable South American monkey) who was experiencing heart failure. She thought that making eye contact and cooing to her tiny patient was the best way to comfort her. Then a vet stepped in and warned her against doing that, telling her she might inadvertently kill the small primate by inducing “capture myopathy.”

Horowitz wasn’t familiar with the term, but quickly learned that this fatal condition can develop when an animal is caught by a predator and experiences a sudden surge of a stress hormone. Unfortunately, this reaction can also be triggered when an animal is held, stared and cooed at by a heart specialist! The eureka moment came when she recognized a connection between capture myopathy and a human cardiac condition, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (broken-heart syndrome), which can be brought on by a variety of “intense, painful emotions … [that] set off life-threatening physical changes in the heart.” She was surprised to realize that a phenomenon veterinarians had known about for decades hadn’t been identified in humans until 2000. So she set out to see if other human diseases had counterparts in the animal kingdom. She began her inquiry by posing the simple question: “Do animals get [fill in the disease]?”
 
In collaboration with science journalist Kathryn Bowers, she combed through fascinating case studies and tapped into current research in a variety of fields. Her goal was to “explore the animal-human overlap where it matters most urgently—in the effort to heal our patients.” To label this field of study, Horowitz and Bowers coined the term “zoobiquity,” a combination of zo, the Greek word for “animal,” and ubique, Latin for “everywhere.”

In each chapter, a human disease or disorder is described and then the animal counterpart is presented. They start by looking at fainting, something that one-third of adults have done at least once in their lives. By questioning vets, they found that dogs also experience “vasovagal syncope”—i.e., faint—in response to everyday activities “like barking and jumping … some canines faint when they’re aroused to sudden activity after being at rest.” And like us, some dogs faint when faced with a needle. In both cases, the reason has to do with a “fight or flight” response in which blood pressure rapidly decreases. In turn, the brain “shuts the system down by fainting.”

In the chapter “Grooming Gone Wild,” they look at human self-injurers (including Princess Diana and Colin Farrell) and compare them with dogs who obsessively lick and gnaw at their bodies in almost in trancelike state. It has been found that some compulsive behaviors in dogs, like this one, are genetically based. Whether OCD in humans and the canine equivalent (CCD) are the same disorder is something that has yet to be determined, but Horowitz puts forth a compelling case for a connection.

This book also gave me many insights, including why dogs thrive on reward-based training. It all has to do with neurocircuitry, which, we learn, is similar in most species, including our own. Basically, this system rewards fitness-promoting behaviors, such as foraging, hunting, “interacting with kin and peers,” mating, escape—behaviors that increase species survival. The authors characterize the rewards as a “chemical-dispensing apparatus stocked with tiny capsules of natural narcotics” such as opioids, cannabinoids, dopamine, oxytocin, and many others. As the authors note, accessing these chemicals is one of the most “potent motivators in animals, including us.” Even slugs have a dopaminergic system that controls the search and consumption of food. As animal expert Gary Wilson explains, “External treats in the form of food and congratulatory sounds are, in effect, bridges to the animal’s brain.” Simply put, good dog training is “driven by pleasure circuits.” Positive, reward-based learning is more effective than dominance- or coercive-based methods because it’s in tune with the way we and our dogs are wired.

This is a truly fascinating look at the similarities between us and other animals. We are not alone in our experience of a spectrum of physical and emotional disorders—among them, chlamydia, depression, bullying and risk-taking among adolescents. The list is long, and exploring it makes for engrossing and enlightening reading.

Culture: Reviews
Kit's Corner: On The Go
Dicky Bag, Poopy Packs and Shortomatic Custom Board Shorts
Kit's Corner Product Review - Dicky Bags, Board Shorts, and Poopy Packs.

Dicky Bag
For times when trashcans are few and far between, Kit’s mom takes a neoprene Dicky Bag along on walks. Two rolls of poop bags fit inside the lid, and poop-filled bags go right into the waterproof, odor-sealed body, keeping bad smells in and hands free.
From £21 (~$34)
dickybag.com

Poopy Packs
With their spiffy designs and cornstarch- based plastic, these are poop bags of choice. Poopy Packs are 100 percent degradable and break down in landfills far more quickly than unnatural plastic bags.
$6.50 for 80 bags
metropaws.com

Shortomatic Custom Board Shorts
Kit has yet to hang ten or catch a wave, but her human surfer friends can put their favorite dog on a pair of custom board shorts. Upload your pup’s picture to Shortomatic’s website, and you’ll soon be swimming and sunning in a one-of-a-kind pair of trunks. $99
shortomatic.com

Culture: Reviews
In a Dog’s Heart
Book Review
In a Dog

Jennifer Arnold believes in dogs, and that the opportunity to engage in relationships with them is a gift. In order to realize the full potential of that gift, she asks a crucial question: “What do dogs want and need … and why does it behoove us to give it to them?” She then proceeds to answer it with chapters on canine health, safety, training and bonding, among other topics. Like her first book, Through a Dog’s Eyes, this one is something of a grab bag of information, but one well worth reading for its gentle, good-natured guidance and insights garnered from two decades spent raising and training service dogs for Canine Assistants.

Culture: Reviews
Sergeant Rex
Book Review
Sergeant Rex by Mike Dowling

Rex, a small German Shepherd at the heart of Mike Dowling’s new memoir, Sergeant Rex, ranks as the longestserving military working dog (MWD) in the Marine Corps. In this thoughtful account of their shared tour of duty in Iraq in 2004, Dowling shows Rex to be impressively brave, competent, even funny in the way only a dog can be. But canine courage is an old saw. Dowling is neither the first soldier to write well about dogs in the Middle East — pick up Royal Marine Pen Farthing’s moving bestseller, One Dog at a Time, which covers his rescue efforts for the strays of Afghanistan — nor the first to venerate the canines of combat. (William Putney’s Always Faithful and Lisa Rogak’s The Dogs of War are the standard- bearers in this department.)

What’s confounding and original about Mike Dowling’s narrative is how genuinely he writes about protecting Rex, all the while embroiling him in situations of brute violence and deadly risk. Deployed as one of the first 12 Marine dog teams embedded with infantry units since the Vietnam War, Rex and Dowling were successful in their assignment to sniff out IEDs (improvised explosive devices, or bombs). Rex alone unearthed hundreds of caches.

This track record no doubt contributed to a Pentagon task force’s conclusion that MWDs are better bomb detectors than any military technology, by far. The armed forces have taken note MWDs on active duty rose from 1,800 in 2001 to 2,700 in 2011, with about 500 dogs being trained each year. With their unparalleled sense of smell, dogs are functionally suited to the task. Physically and mentally, however, they experience some of the same maladies as their human counterparts. Though the military does not make statistics readily available, dogs are also suffering from a canine form of PTSD and traumatic injury, as well as dying in considerable numbers. So when Dowling “speaks” for Rex through italicized interjections of die-hard zeal and ooh-rah patriotism on missions in the most dangerous areas in and around Fallujah and Baghdad, it’s difficult to believe his assertions that he has the dog’s best interest in mind. After all, every dog in the military is drafted without consent.

Dowling, a voluntary soldier, writes about the U.S. military cause with pure enthusiasm. A capable dog handler, he nurtures Rex’s skills. He loves this dog, and cares for him with unassailable constancy. That much is apparent. But Dowling conflates Rex’s interest in doing the job before him (for the reward of a game of ball) with a conceptual allegiance to the American values these soldiers are defending. In one harrowing scene, Dowling brings Rex, who is already injured, along on a mission anyway. “A barrage of blasts” rattles their vehicle and “Rex goes jittery as hell. He keeps glancing at me with a look of real pain on his features.” In another scene, Rex fixes his protector with “a lonely, frightened gaze, like he’s convinced he’s been abandoned.” In yet another, Rex urinates out of fear. No matter how faithfully allied Dowling is with his dog in combat, these scenes are nevertheless excruciating for an animal lover to read.

Early in the book, Dowling reflects on setting out for their first mission. “Rex trusted me 100 percent, in that unique bond between man and dog. Yet he had no choice in my taking us to war, and he had no idea of the dangers we were flying into.” Everything Rex accomplishes, everything he survives — Dowling is right: Rex does deserve a Purple Heart for his courage. And Dowling deserves the acknowledgment he has earned too. But a medal for military service would mean nothing to a dog. He would not understand why he was receiving it.

Culture: Reviews
Why We Love Wilfred
A man in a dog suit? Funny? Really? Yes!
Wilfred

Wilfred, the weirdly wonderful comedy on the FX channel has just begun its second season. What a breath of fresh air in the mostly stale world of television humor. It stars Elijah Wood (Lord of the Rings) and Jason Gann, an Aussie bloke who’s also the co-creator and star of the popular Australian series on which this show is based. Wood plays Ryan, a suicidal, depressed attorney who befriends the neighbor’s dog (Gann). To everyone else, including his owner, the dog is a regular canine. But to Ryan (and the audience) he’s a man in a cheap dog suit. The big surprise is that it works and that it makes us laugh out loud. The writers know dogs, and dog people. Here’s why it’s must-see TV:

> It plays off our tendency to anthropomorphize dogs … in a big way. This dog talks and digs holes with a shovel, and uses a bong to demonstrate the principles of clicker training.

> The writers have the imagination to show stuffing a Kong as a lascivious act.

> Likewise, they mostly skip the obvious poop and pee jokes and go with more revelatory (and funnier) routines involving lasers, separation anxiety and canine therapy.

> It goes against the grain. Show biz dogs tend to be sweet, cuddly pups, but Wilfred is a crude, surly, beer-swilling sort who’s nonetheless loveable. Sort of like your brother-in-law.

> The show proves that deep down, dogs are existentialists and that their reason for being is to show us humans how to overcome fears and embrace life.

> It celebrates just hanging out with your dog — sure, it’s in the basement with smokes and a six-pack, but life is great.

Culture: Reviews
Your Dog’s Best Health Review
Your Dog

Celebrated veterinarian and author Nancy Kay, DVM, a winner of the Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award, is back with another excellent guide to help you f ind top-notch health care for your dog. Organized as a set of twelve reasonable things you can expect from your vet, Your Dog’s Best Health brings clarity to many murky issues for pet owners Should I expect 24-hour care for my dog when he’s hospitalized? Is it considered appropriate to ask for cost estimates up front or a second opinion? Written with Kay’s trademark humor and intelligence, this book provides all the reassuring answers to questions you were afraid to ask.

Culture: Reviews
Sammy in the Sky Review
Sammy in the Sky

This is a truly lovely book, both in its writing and illustrations, about the love between a little girl and the “best hound dog in the world.” It is also a story about the death of a dog, written in a clear, non-sentimental way that makes it an appropriate choice for the introduction of this difficult topic to a young reader (actually, it’s suitable for a reader of any age). The illustrations beautifully express the joy that a dog’s friendship brings, and the poignancy of memories that will last forever. This is a rare achievement in a children’s book.

Culture: Reviews
Dog InSight Review
Dogwise Publishing
Dog Insight - Pamela Reid

A second book from influential behaviorist and trainer Pamela Reid, Dog InSight brings together more than 40 essays on canine behavior, techniques to modify it and the principles behind both. Originally published as monthly columns in Dogs in Canada magazine, the chapters in this book cover key tricks of the trade, such as calming signals, social learning and operant conditioning. Typical problems are handily addressed — excessive barking, resource guarding and separation anxiety, for example. Readers will benefit from the technique explanations; understanding why a given cue works helps independent trainers go much further with their dogs. Particularly poignant (and rare for a training book) is the final chapter on easing the pain of loss, in which Reid suggests rites of passage for dogs in their last days, as well as tributes to those we have lost.

Culture: Reviews
Tame Dogs and Wild Youth
The bold strokes of today’s young-adult lit
Stay With Me - Cover

Imagine star-crossed lovers of old would blush and faint before indulging in the kind of libidinal excess that courses through young-adult novels these days. But Paul Griffin knows better than all that. An award-winning novelist who also trains dogs and works with incarcerated young people, Griffin has penned a highly praised new book, Stay with Me, that celebrates the drama, heartbreak and fragile sensuality of today’s accelerated teenage life.

Stay with Me recounts the tragic fate of a sweet rescued fighting dog named Boo and her unlikely caretakers, two 15-year-old lovers hamstrung by burdensome disadvantages. Mack Morse, an abandoned, then abused high-school dropout, has a rap sheet and a special knack with dogs. He also struggles with violent thoughts that manifest as a hissing in his head, “like when you roll the radio to static and dial up the volume.”

The only remedy? You guessed it his coworker —bright, comely and selfdeprecating Céce Vaccuccia, who studies assiduously and parents her own mother, Carmella, whom she describes with characteristic teenage sarcasm as a “never-married, twice-knocked-up and ditched alcoholic with crippling bunions.”

While each of these facts may be true about Carmella, and the judgment behind them heartfelt, there’s no doubt that Céce loves her mother. This is much the same for all of Griffin’s characters. We are drawn into the oppressive grind of their lives; their words are sharp and their fates are grim, but their essential moral fiber withstands the wear and tear of their preventable, regrettable mistakes. These are, despite their deplorable decisions and even heinous acts, good people.

Mack compels Céce — scarred by a dog attack during childhood — to befriend his dog, Boo. “You’ve got to go a long way into evil to turn a Pit against people,” says Mack. “They forgive easy as rain falls.” And so, in turn, does Céce. The magic of love’s force transports the couple to a new and terribly temporary happiness. But when Boo suffers brutal violence yet again, Céce is nowhere to be found and Mack acts on an aggressive impulse, destroying any prospects for their future together.

While Mack’s character develops and deepens as a result of his poor choices, Céce’s prospects wither following his withdrawal. But her world is open now to the solace of a loyal dog, something she would never have had without learning to trust Boo, and the heedless abandon she experienced with Mack.

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