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Good Dog: Activities & Sports
Recipe for a Great Canine Running Partner
The ABCs for your first runs together
You like to run, your dog likes to run. It seems like a no-brainer: How about the two of you running together? While you might be concerned about your dog’s ability to run a reasonable distance, the most common hindrance to sharing this passion is your dog’s ability to stay at your side. First steps Because you’ll want your dog’s front feet even with or slightly behind yours during a run,...
Blog: Karen B. London
Tangled in the Leash
Awkward, embarrassing and dangerous
Watching a neighbor walk a couple of dogs by my house recently, it appeared more as though the group was attempting a complicated macramé pattern than going on a brisk walk. These sweet dogs were weaving in and out, twisting around my neighbor, their leashes, and each other. One word came to mind: chaos. I’m not picking on the person—just empathizing. I’ve had my share of leash mishaps, and...
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Why Elite Runners Make Great Dog Trainers
Going the distance
I should have realized right away that something special was going on in a group dog-training session last spring. When I asked the participants to call their dogs to come and then run away, they all did, and with Whippet-like speed. Most people need lots of encouragement to run, and even then — looking sheepish — they tend to take a few half-hearted jogging steps at most. This was no ordinary...
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
How to Train a Dog with Car Crate Anxiety
Don't leave me!
Q Charley, a rescued three year- old Lab who’d spent his entire life in an outdoor kennel, was scared of everything when we first got him. He’s been with us for eight months and now, he panics when we leave him alone. We have two crates, one in our house and one in our car. He goes into the home crate and stays there for about an hour. I’ve been gradually closing the door and even leaving the...
Blog: Karen B. London
Preventing Aggression over Food
A simple approach is often effective
“I’ve been putting my hand in his food while he’s eating since he was a puppy, so he’s never growled at me over his food.” This sort of comment sets my teeth on edge because repeatedly bothering a dog who is eating is actually an effective technique for teaching dogs to behave aggressively around food, NOT a great way to prevent it. Many such dogs start to growl, snap, or bite when someone...
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Eight Basic Training Cues to Teach Your Dog
Cue ’em in
Trainers spend a dog’s lifetime teaching new cues and behaviors, but there are a few worth teaching every dog sooner rather than later. WaitDon’t move forward. This cue is especially useful at doors. Dogs who wait are easier to take on walks and let in and out of the car because they don’t go through the door until given permission. Wait is also a great safety prompt, in that it can prevent a...
Blog: Karen B. London
Trick Video Reveals Happy Dog
Mental exercise improves quality of life
I love this video of a dog going performing a series of tricks and tasks. (It helps that this dog is so cute it hurts!) The first thing I notice when I look at this video is an adorable dog performing tricks. But I also see the benefits of a dog who has had ample mental exercise. This dog looks incredibly happy as she goes through her repertoire. Everybody knows that dogs need physical...
Good Dog: Behavior & Training
Cautious Canines
Understanding and helping fearful dogs
For the first month after he was adopted, Sunny spent his time in the corner of one room, in which he ate, slept, eliminated and watched the world go by. Murphy whimpered, barked, and chewed the carpet and the door whenever she was left alone. Tucker growled and lunged at every man he encountered. Maggie was inconsolable during thunderstorms— pacing, whining, circling, jumping in and out of the...
Blog: JoAnna Lou
The Restorative Effect of Sugar
Study looks at sugar, self-control and performance
We ask a lot of our dogs. We ask them to resist food on the counter, to stay inside when the front door is open and to be quiet when dogs are barking next door. With my new puppy, I’ve been thinking a lot about self-control, which is the foundation for everything from household manners to agility skills. In humans, research has shown that there’s a relationship between the brain’s glucose supply...
Blog: Guest Posts
Dogs Can Sign Too
And they have much to say
An amazing event occurred recently at AnimalSign Center. There, I teach dogs, horses and cats enhanced communication skills. I use AnimalSign Language, which is much like Baby Sign or Gorilla Sign, but it’s made for domestic animals. I think nothing of seeing dogs K9Sign that they need water, want specific foods or naming people at the door, or on the phone. But a few weeks ago, I was awed by...

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