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Lady and the Tramp Mentality
Washington Post article reinforces purebred vs. mix debate
My mixed breed, Ginger Peach, has added AKC events to her sports calendar.

When Washington Post reporter Monica Hesse contacted me about my AKC/mixed breed blog post, I was flattered and eager to share my thoughts on this controversial decision. Unfortunately, Hesse was on a tight deadline and we never connected for a formal interview. After reading the piece, I was surprised at its "Lady and the Tramp" mentality. From the first sentence, she paints lovely images worthy of any literary novel, yet they reinforce an ignorant stereotype that purebred dogs are superior over mixed breeds. For example, while attending a dog show where both purebreds and mutts, ahem, mix, she compares the "sly Border Collies, whose owners plaster their cars with bumper stickers reading, 'My Border Collie is smarter than your honor student,' to mixed breed Otis, who "might lick his rear end." Talk about a cheap shot! I've got news for Hesse and the general public--purebreds lick their rear ends. And they probably drink out of the toilet, too. It is my fervent hope that the mingling of purebreds and mixes at AKC events will remind us that they are all dogs, regardless of pedigree.

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Julia Kamysz Lane, owner of Spot On K9 Sports and contributing editor at The Bark, is the author of multiple New Orleans travel guides, including Frommer’s New Orleans Day by Day (3rd Edition). Her work has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Poets and Writers and Publishers Weekly.

SpotOnK9Sports.com
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Submitted by JoAnna Lou | June 1 2010 |

I know what you mean! It seems like every newspaper picked up the AKC mixed breed story and almost every one I read has made the whole thing overly dramatic, like it's some epic divide. It's comical since so many people have both pure and mixed breeds in their family :)

Submitted by Anonymous | June 1 2010 |

A mixed breed dog is a one of a kind. A rare gem. So unique that no one else has one. I don't know why you would want the same old run of the mill that everyone and their brother has.

Submitted by Anonymous | February 20 2013 |

i would save a mixed breed dog from a kennel and have a best friend for life, rather than pay out the nose for a dog that's got it made.

Submitted by Anonymous | January 3 2014 |

I know what you're saying couldn't be more accurate because I recently contacted somebody from that agency (AKC) or a similar 1 (don't recall because their snobby organization is just that UNIMPORTANT to me) that was having a big dog show in my city. I looked at their schedule & realized they didn't have the name of an owner/speaker & dog for a certain breed that was scheduled to be there for their "meet the breed" event. The 1 breed that didn't have somebody on the schedule was the same breed of dog I own, & he is an excellent representative of the breed. I am 95% sure he is a purebred, but he didn't come with papers because he was rescued, & honestly never thought it mattered for participation in any of the events there. So I emailed them to see how you can apply or register to represent a breed at the event, & my jaw dropped when I read the lady's email reply to me! And as I read more, it dropped so far down, I thought I'd have to pick it up off the floor! The lady was the biggest snob I've ever encountered, & was extremely rude & demeaning. It made me want to throw up, honestly. I'm trying to recall the details to explain what happened, & but because right now my blood is starting to boil all over again just like it did as I read her response, you'll just have to take my word for it!

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