Home
Behavior & Training
Print|Text Size: ||
Archaeologist Dog Finds Bones
No tools can do what she can

It really should come as no surprise that a dog can be trained to find bones. In fact, it’s hard to think of a job better suited to them. Yet, Migaloo the Black Lab is believed by her guardians to be the first dog who has been specifically trained to find buried human bones at archaeological sites. Trained cadaver dogs have previously discovered human bones that were nearly 200 years old, though they were not specifically trained to do so.

Migaloo was trained to alert to skeletal remains with the use of a 250-year old human skeleton on loan from a museum. It took six months of training, field trials and search tests to turn her into an archaeologist. Now Migaloo can do what no humans can do, even with the assistance of radar, magnetic technology and help from historical records. She can find ancient humans bones with high reliability due to their distinct odor. It’s unclear what that odor is and many people are surprised that there is a specific odor. Perhaps that’s why some people didn’t think dogs would succeed in this sort of work.

But Migaloo has succeeded, finding human bones over 600 years old that she was able to detect at a depth of two meters. Her job is to work at sacred Aboriginal sites in Australia finding skeletal remains. Her knowledge can be used either to find places to excavate or to find and protect burial sites. Perhaps soon there will be other dogs working at sites around the world at sites of ancient civilizations.

Migaloo is rewarded for her work not with a bone of her own, but with a game of fetch.

Print

Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose clinical work over the last 17 years has focused on the evaluation and treatment of serious behavioral problems in dogs, especially aggression. Karen has been writing the behavior column for The Bark since 2012 and wrote The Bark’s training column and various other articles for eight years before that. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, and teaches a tropical field biology course in Costa Rica. Karen writes an animal column, The London Zoo, which appear in The Arizona Daily Sun and is the author of five books on canine training and behavior. She is working on her next book, which she expects to be published in 2017.

iStock photo

More From The Bark

By
Karen B. London
By
Patricia McConnell
By
Karen B. London
More in Behavior & Training:
Pit Bull: What's In a Dog Breed?
High-Tech Solutions For Your Dog's Separation Anxiety
The CIA’s Spot On Dog Training Tips
Dogs as Model for Emotional Expression by Robots
Has a Dog Saved Your Life?
Licking the Bowl
Dogs Help Us Be the Greatest Version of Ourselves
Flagstaff Dog Running
Is More Always Merrier?
Break-Ups and Good-Byes