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Claudia Kawczynska is The Bark’s editor in chief. Cameron Woo is The Bark’s publisher.

Smiling Dog: Tribute to Harley
What’s your dog’s name and age? Harley, 16 years
 
Adoption Story:
 
Harley's person saw an ad on the internet offering a four-year-old dog who could no longer be cared for. The previous owners had divorced, while one was always traveling for work, the other divorcee moved into a apartment too small for Harley. Harley had so much joy and couldn't wait to share it with his new person! He licked his new person's face and didn't stop for weeks.
 
 
Harley's Interests:
 
He loved daily walks and absolutely loved people. He would work a room like a politician, greeting each person while smiling, and making friends.
 
Harley was a beautiful dog with a beautiful heart, he had charisma and was a joy to be around. Harley touched all the people in his life in a way that no animal had ever done before. Harley passed away last November, leaving a legacy of love behind. His family visits him often at a spot overlooking a pond, sharing stories of their walks in the woods and wonderful life.
 
Smiling Dog: Sweet Peg

Dog’s name and age: Peg, 4.5 years

Nicknames: Peggy Wiggle

Adoption Story:

Peg was rescued from a kill shelter in Romania where she had a badly infected paw and eye. Unfortunately, she hadn't been receiving any veterinary care while at the shelter in Romania so vets had to remove both as the infection had spread too far for either to be saved. Peg's people were looking for another special needs dog to adopt when they saw a notice on social media for her. Because Peg only has 3 legs and 1 eye, she didn't receive much interest from other adopters. Thankfully her people immediately started the adoption process after reading her story.  Peg was in Romania but after her passport and transport could be arranged, she met her new people in the UK 13 days later. Though they had never met her before the adoption, as soon as they saw her, it was love at first sight.  Her enormous smile just melted their hearts. 

Does Peg with with other dogs?

Yes! She shares her home with 3 other special needs rescues.

Peg's Interests:

She loves her hops around the neighborhood.  Since she was a street dog, she loves watching the world go by and likes to stop at doorways hoping for a treat or a fuss. She sleeps on the bed with her people, so she races up the stairs to roll on the bed, then she'll stretch out for a full tummy rub before settling down to sleep every night without fail.

Peg is a free spirit, a fighter and survivor but hasn't lost the ability to love and be loved.


SHARE YOUR SMILING DOG!
We LOVE them and we WANT yours! We pick 40 favorites to appear in each issue of The Bark magazine. 

Brushless Oral Care
SPONSORED
Brushless Oral Care

What is Oratene Brushless Oral Care?

Oratene was created by the developer of Biotene, the #1 dentist recommended product for people with Dry Mouth. Oratene has been formulated specially for pets and based on the same 35+ year enzyme technology. Formerly known at Biotene Veterinarian Brushless Oral Care, Oratene features patented, dual enzyme systems which offer superior brushless oral care to help eliminate odor-causing bacteria and plaque biofilm.

Who will benefit most from Oratene?

All pets will benefit from Oratene but is especially beneficial to pets on medications.

What's the medication connection?

Just like people, pets can develop a condition called Dry Mouth (Xerostomia) due to their medications. Medications can alter the protective benefits of saliva by affecting the quantity or more importantly, the quality. Dry Mouth can lead to bacterial overgrowth, periodontal diseases, inflamed gums and even tooth loss.

What types of medications can contribute to Dry Mouth?

Some of the most common classifications are: Anti-hypertensive/diuretic/cardiac, behavior/anti-anxiety, incontinence, NSAIDs/Pain, anticonvulsants.

What is an indicator a pet may have Dry Mouth?

Halitosis and plaque are the most common; however, there are many others such as thick saliva, inflamed gums, periodontal disease and tooth loss.

Can both dogs and cats use it? Is there an age restriction?

Oratene is formulated to be safe for dogs and cats of any age. Does not contain Xylitol, alcohol, chlorine or toothstaining chlorhexidine so it is safe and recommended for everyday use.

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Mary Tyler Moore: A Loss for Fans and Animals

Television fans (and working women in particular) are mourning the passing of actress Mary Tyler Moore. She is the rare individual who not only entertained but inspired generations with her characters’ independence, smarts and spunk. The actress will also be missed by her beloved animals—the menagerie of cats and dogs she shared her home with, and the legions of animals saved through Broadway Barks, the animal rescue event/organization she founded in New York with her friend Bernadette Peters. The star-studded event benefits New York City animal shelters and adoption agencies, while educating New Yorkers on the plight of the thousands of homeless dogs and cats in the metropolitan area. In July, Broadway Barks celebrated its 18th annual fundraiser, contributing to 27 organizations and adopting out over 200 animals. The event and organization will continue as a living testament to the love and spirit of Mary Tyler Moore, actress, producer, philanthropist and activist.

Pet Health Care Monopoly
Is the Mars acquisition of VCA cause for concern?

An explosive, must-read article in Bloomberg Business Week looks at what happens when big business monopolizes the pet health business and how this corporatization might not be in the best interests for our dogs. 

Ever wonder why many veterinarians do not heed the 2003 American Animal Hospital Association’s recommendation for core vaccines to be administered every three years? Instead a number of vets still prescribe annual vaccinations—with boosters for distemper, parvovirus and adenovirus. According to the Bloomberg article the immunologist, Ronald Schultz, from the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, was one of those researchers who recommended this three-year protocol in the 1970s. He recalls that the AAHA Canine Vaccination Task Force, facing a revolt from vets about the decrease in their future vaccine incomes, struck a compromise at three years instead of the once-in-a-lifetime approach that he and others recommended. But yet you can find that annual vaccines are still being recommended by the 1,000 Banfield Vet Clinics in this country. Another surprising fact is that pet vaccines seem to be the only vaccines where one size, seemingly, fits all—the doses are the same regardless of weight or size of the animal, so the same 1 milliliter is given to a Chihuahua or an Irish Wolfhound—very little research has ever justified that approach. Bloomberg points to an example from Banfield's software program "Pet Ware," used to instruct the veterinarians in diagnosing and prescription advice:

“the book shows a checklist of therapies for a dog with atopic dermatitis, or itchy skin. Doctors are encouraged to recommend a biopsy, analgesics, topical medications, antibiotics, a therapeutic dietary supplement, an allergy diet, and a flea control package. They’re required to recommend antihistamines, shampoos, serum allergy testing, lab work, a skin diagnostic package, and anti-inflammatories. It’s a treatment course that might run $900 for symptoms that, in a best-case scenario, indicate something as prosaic as fleas. The manual reminds doctors: You cannot change items that were initially marked Required. They must remain required.

No wonder the pet health industry is booming and going through a period of rapid consolidations, Banfield, located in many PetSmart stores, was purchased in 2007 by Mars, the candymaker and pet food giant (the largest in the world with over $17 billion in sales from brands like Pedigree,  Cesar, Eukanuba, Iams, Natura brands, Royal Canin, Sheba, Nutro). Then in 2015 the Mars Petcare portfolio of vet clinics grew when they acquired BluePearl Veterinary Services, with an additional 55 locations.

Mars, seemingly, facing a slowdown in consumer purchases of prepared/package foods and sugary products, is acquiring even more veterinarian companies and it was announced that their newest acquistion that they are paying $7.7 billion is VCA, Inc., the veterinary and doggie day-care business based in Los Angeles. VCA owns 750 hospitals and employs 3000 vets and 23,000 people, and had a 2015 revenue of $2.1 billion. The Los Angeles Times noted that “VCA has used acquisitions to combine hospitals, diagnostic labs and veterinarians into its network. In 2014, the company even acquired a dog day-care chain called Camp Bow Wow.” 

And similar to Banfield’s approach, the Times notes that “VCA has been criticized at times by some customers for requiring tests that can be costly, but VCA maintains that it’s against its policy to sell unnecessary tests or treatments.” But 41 percent of VCA’s operating profits comes from their company’s Antech Diagnostics that also does bloodwork and other tests for more than half of the country’s hospitals, including their own of course. As Bloomberg reported, Tom Fuller, VCA’s chief financial officer, puts it this way when he speaks to investors: “Diagnostics is what grows the industry.” And the company’s business strategy has been “to leverage our existing customer base by increasing the number and intensity of the services received during each visit” (as found in their annual financial reports by Bloomberg reporting.)

Pushing tests unto clients is “good” for business, if not always for their clients’ pets,

"according to Wendy Beers, a veterinarian who resigned in 2014 from a VCA hospital in Albany, Calif. 'Every month they would print out things to say how many packages you sold, how many procedures you did,' she says. 'And if they came out and said, ‘This month we want everyone to do 20 heartworm tests,’ and you only did eight, well, next month you have to do better. I don’t feel when they’re lecturing us that their chief interest is to make sure animals get the best care.'”

According to Ken Shea, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence, who says that with Mars’ expanding presence in animal hospitals, the company will have an opportunity to use the facilities to sell even more of its pet foods. Is this troubling news for pet parents? A recent class action suit brought on behalf of consumers by a San Francisco law firm thickens the plot further when you consider that this suit contends that pet food manufacturers (including Mars) and retailers (such as PetSmart) are using "prescriptions" to justify overcharging consumers for food that contains no restricted ingredients. Neither the FDA nor any other government agency mandates such prescriptions.

Bloomberg clearly makes the case why all these things, like over vaccinations, unnecessary testing, false prescriptions for pet food matters is that veterinary medicine is largely unregulated. And one of the reasons why businesses like Mars find the pet industry a good investment strategy is that

“...pet owners pay cash: Vets don’t deal with insurers haggling for better prices or questioning whether that vaccine or ultrasound or blood panel is really necessary. (A small percentage of pet owners carry insurance, but they pay vets upfront, like anyone else, and then take on their insurers for reimbursement.) What’s more, when veterinarians make fatal mistakes, they face no real financial consequences. The law hasn’t changed to reflect the attitudes of the average pet owner; courts still treat pets as property. Damages paid to owners whose pets have been killed or injured are so low that a typical medical malpractice insurance policy for a veterinarian costs less than $20 a month. Damages are so low, in fact, that few pet owners can find a lawyer willing to take even the most egregious case of veterinary malpractice.”

So, yes, it should matter, and as always, it is good to understand what you are up against, what to expect if you use any of these services, to double check before you agree to over vaccinations, or receive a “prescription” for pet food, you are after all the only advocate your dog has and the better informed you are, the better decisions you will make. Nancy Kay, DVM, author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life, added that she “feels truly disheartened for my profession” about this expansion of Mars’ vet monopoly. Be sure to read the Bloomberg story and get the word out.

Bark Holiday Gift Guide for Pet Lovers
12 Perfect Dog Gifts

1. Clickit Sport safety harness helps diminish the risk of injury to pets in a car accident or sudden stop. It was rigorously tested to include the same crash tests used to test child safety restraints.

2. Molly Mutt’s new dog crate pads get a helping hand from elsewhere in the animal kingdom — sheep! That’s because they’re filled with 100% natural and sustainably-sourced wool from California. Warm in the winter and cool in the summer, wool is the ideal match for crate pads. starting at $79.

3. The Snood from Gold Paw Series is a festive, super-toasty, lusciously-soft, neck and ear warmer for dogs of every shape and size. Made in the USA with recycled materials in four colors, sizes S-XL.

4. For fetch-loving dogs who just won’t tire, the interactive iFetch Automatic Ball Launcher lets your dog fetch to their heart’s content. Choose from the original iFetch for small to medium sized dogs or the iFetch Too for larger breeds. Get ready for non-stop fun!

5. Pawsitively Safe is the perfect stocking stuffer. Each tag provides vital information so pet finders can contact you immediately by email, text or phone, getting your pet home safe and found. $12.99, free shipping!

6. The Ruffwear Front Range™ Harness is an easy-to-fi t, everyday dog harness that’s comfortable to wear all-day and built to last a lifetime of adventures. Perfect for casual treks, training or when additional support is needed.

7. Wrapsit™ slipcover crate slides onto a folding quad chair to instantly create a mesh-sided safe haven for Fido anytime you open your chair. Wrapsit folds with the chair to become the carrying case, take your dog with you wherever you have fun.

8. We love pets. We share our home with them. We rescue them. We advocate for them. And Todd Belcher at Jimmydog paints a whole lot of them. The perfect gift for the pet lovers in your life. To ensure holiday delivery, contact them today at todd@jimmydog.com or 336.201.7475.

9. This holiday season you can give your pooch a way to snoodle up in style, with the William Wegman-designed ‘Throver’ blanket from Crypton. Great for home, car, picnic or anywhere you’d welcome a touch of style and comfort along with stain resistance and odor control. Offered in several snazzy, snuggly styles.

10. The Icebug Metro offers the perfect blend of comfort, warmth, and sure-footed traction on any surface, from dry asphalt to pure ice so you can walk your dog everyday, even in cold, wet, slippery winter. A Bark Editors’ Pick!

11. Lindy’s Bakery offers 10 different recipes of delicious dog treats. 100% of the proceeds go to help homeless youth at Daybreak in Dayton, OH. From $5.99 to $6.99 for a 6 oz. package.

12. This handmade pet bed is two-toned gray and a repurposed wine crate. Includes a vintage butterfly print pillow and bolster for the pampered pet.

Halloween Scrooge
Have we gone too far with this Halloween dog costume thing?
Have we gone too far with this Halloween dog costume thing?

I hate to admit it but I’m a Scrooge when it comes to dressing dogs up in Halloween costumes. I know that some dogs look irresistibly cute but few, in my eyes, really seem to enjoy it as much as we humans do. Especially when the costumes are too elaborate, that seems to be happening more and more. So I was relieved when I read New York Magazine’s blog “The Cut” and how they too frowned at this extravaganza that, at this time of year, is on display at dog runs around the city. Foremost among them is the ever popular event at the Tompkins Square dog run. That particular one we have covered in the past with contributing editor, Lee Harrington (author of the popular Rex and the City), even serving as one of the judges. I guess it is just that people might just be going overboard and not paying enough attention to how their dogs are taking it on it, or trying to squirm out of restrictive costumes. As The Cut pointed out, that a few years ago Alexandra Horowitz had this observation about costuming a dog in the New Yorker:

“To a dog, a costume, fitting tight around the dog’s midriff and back, might well reproduce that ancestral feeling [of being scolded by a more powerful dog]. So the principal experience of wearing a costume would not be the experience of festivity; rather, the costume produces the discomfiting feeling that someone higher ranking is nearby. This interpretation is borne out by many dogs’ behavior when getting dressed in a costume: they may freeze in place as if they are being “dominated”— and soon try to dislodge the garments by shaking, pawing, or rolling in something so foul that it necessitates immediate disrobing.”

Or Patricia McConnell, the leading dog behaviorist and former Bark columnist, commented on this topic last year that

“I can’t think of anything that better exemplifies our changing perception of the social role of dogs as the current splurge in dressing them up for Halloween.”

She then went on to say that:

“But what about the family Labrador dressed up like Batman? Or the Persian house cat dressed up as a mouse? Are they having as much fun as their owners? I suspect that many are not.”

Karen London, our behavior columnist, also agrees and she urges “caution when considering costumes for dogs. Most dogs hate costumes. They easily become stressed and uncomfortable when wearing clothing, especially anything on the head or around the body.”

Simple, soft costumes, like this one, work best. But heavy, stiff and hard ones like this one, should be avoided.

There are so many better ways to share the joys of our relationship than imposing the necessity to “perform” for us on our dogs, then dress them up as a superhero, pope, or a presidential candidate. Just think of much more they would like it if you just took them on a nice long walk in the woods letting them sniff around, letting them follow their noses and embracing them for being “just” dogs.

So what do you think? Do you or have you ever dressed your dog up for Halloween? How did your dog like it?

199 Common Poisonous Plants to People and Pets
86 toxic plants to keep away from your dog

While plants and flowers are a great way to decorate, not every plant is safe in a home with pets. Below is a list of 199 common poisonous plants, 86 of which are toxic to dogs, so you can be sure you’re picking the safest choice. The majority are safe to grown in your home, but should be avoided if you’re concerned of accidental ingestion from a curious and/or hungry pup. Look through the list of plant names and make sure no one in your home is at risk. 

Poisonous Plants

 

Infographic by proflowers.com

A Push for Stricter Rules for Service Pets on Airplanes
Pretending to be Service Dog to Travel First Class

Are the rules governing service animals on airplanes about to change? The US Department of Transportation’s advisory committee on accessible air transportation met recently to consider refining the presents rules for Emotional Service Animals. Ever since 2003 when the DOT revised its policy on service animals to include emotional-support animals, there have been no restrictions for these animals and no real definition of a service dog. As Jenine Stanley, who serves on the committee and is with the Guide Dog Foundation, has noted there are no real rules as to what is a legitimate service or support animal.

“Once you board your plane with your animal and you say ‘I am coming with a service animal,’ i.e. an animal that is trained to medicate my disability, it’s anyone’s guess as to whether it’s true or not,” she said. Which is why the U.S. DOT wants to change the rules.

There have been numerous complaints from fellow travelers about the wide assortment of species, from miniature horses, pigs, boas, cats, and of course, dogs, that have been accorded the status of ESA and who usually have scant training about how to behave on an airplane. Some of the complaints have also been generated by people who have highly trained and skilled service dogs, such as seeing-eye dogs. Many of the ESA pets on planes can also distract (to put it mildly) a service dog from doing her job.

One key issue the committtee looked at was: Should specific species be defined? If so, what are they? The group suggested only dogs be listed as service animals, and dogs, cats and rabbits qualify as emotional support animals.

Another complication surrounding ESAs are the legal ramifications to the mental health professionals who are providing certifications. The University of Missouri recently conducted a study about the possible conflicts this presents to psychologists. Cassie Boness, a graduate student in clinical psychology, says these requests for certification for emotional support animals present several potential conflicts for mental health professionals.

“There are no standards for evaluating the need for an emotional support animal, whereas there are concrete rules to determine if someone is eligible for a service animal. These emotional support animal letters are formal certifications of psychological disability, and the psychotherapist is stating, by writing such a letter, that the person needing the emotional support animal has such a disability and that the presence of the animal addresses that disability.” Jeffrey Younggren, professor of clinical and forensic psychology, believes that the evaluation process should address the specific psychological issues that are going to be improved, and not just that the owner wants to be with their pet. They also noted that the lack of scientific guidelines regarding emotional support animals would make it difficult for the psychologist to defend this certification letter in court.

Younggren noted that "the study recommended was two fold: First, that these letters not be written by treating therapists for ethical issues but that they should be written by forensic evaluators/psychologists who do not have a dual role with the client. Second, we stated that, since these are disability determinations, there needs to be some type of comprehensive psychological assessment of that disability and that assessment should directly assess how the presence of the animal ameliorates the disability."

The working group committee members include representatives from American Airlines, Psychiatric Service Dog Partners, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind and America’s VetDogs. Key issues about service animals can be found here.

Stanley said she expects the new rules to be out for public comment within the year and to be set within three years.

Alternative Methods for Making Yogurt for Your Dog
DIY: How To Make Yogurt at Home
Home-made yogurt

Crock Pot Yogurt Method

This is a very easy method to make yogurt. All you need is a slow cooker, milk, a live-active yogurt starter (either from a previous batch, or a store bought plain yogurt), and, a cooking thermometer (that is optional).

Steps:

1. Pour one to two quarts of milk (low fat or whole) into a slow cooker, cover the pot. Turn the heat on medium or high. Heat the milk slowly, it needs to get to reach at least 180 degrees (30 mins. to an hour or longer). Stir a few times while it is heating, make sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot and that it doesn’t boil.

2. Turn the slow cooker off, uncover and unplug it and let the milk cool down to 110 degrees, this too can take 30 mins. to an hour or even longer.

3. While the heated milk is cooling off, take the starter out of the refrigerator. If you are using a quart of milk use a tablespoon of the starter, if you are using two quarts, use 2 tablespoons.

4. Once the milk has cooled to 110 degrees, ladle a small amount (1/3 of a cup or so) into a small bowl or measuring cup with the starter, then stir or whisk. Make sure you incorporate all of it, and then slowly add that mixture back into the crock pot, stirring thoroughly.

5. With the crock pot turned off, replace the lid, and wrap the pot with two or more towels. Make sure you do NOT disturb the pot; yogurt prefers a very still environment to go through the fermentation process. The low heat that was generated in Step 1, is sufficient for this process. This process can take 6 to 8 hours.

6. If you are making Greek style yogurt, carefully transfer or pour the yogurt into the EuroCuisine strainer (or use cheesecloth) and refrigerate at least 4 hours. If you are making regular style yogurt, you can put the yogurt in mason/glass jars, and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight. If you are making Greek style yogurt, you will place the “finished” yogurt in glass jars, preserving the whey.

Dehydrator Yogurt Method

Yet another sure fire way to make yogurt is using a dehydrator. Following the same cooking steps in the “heating pad” method of heating the milk, cooling it, and inoculating it with a yogurt starter, the next step is to pour the milk into glass jars, cover each with a lid (the plastic mason jar lids work well) and place them on the bottom shelf of a dehydrator, first removing the other shelves. Many dehydrators have a temperature setting for yogurt. Place the cover back on the dehydrator and incubate for 8 to 10 hours at 115 degrees (or following the setting on your dehydrator). Similar to the other methods, after the yogurt has set, refrigerate at least 4 hours. You will be amazed at how different (thicker) the yogurt becomes after it has been refrigerated.

If you are making Greek style yogurt, strained it either using cheese cloth in a strainer or the Euro Cuisine GY50 Greek Yogurt Maker method, first in the refrigerator, and then putting it into jars. Yogurt keeps for about a week.

What is Whey?

Whey is the by-product of the yogurt making process, especially when you strain yogurt to produce a thicker, i.e. Greek style product. Whey protein is considered a complete protein and contains all 9 essential amino acids and is low in lactose content, so do not throw this precious liquid away! If you do not use it within a week or so, you can freeze it for later use.

Here are some of the endless ideas for using whey protein:

• For making smoothies (2 g of protein in one cup)

• In baking muffins, pancakes, breads, dog treats.

• Soaking beans or lentils (great to add to your dog’s meals)

• Use as a “topping” for your dog’s food. *

• As a substitute for buttermilk in recipes.

• Use in salad dressings (it is as acidic as a citric juice).

• Protein Shake

Making A Super Protein Shake For Dogs

One of my favorite uses for whey is to make a super protein “shake” for the dogs, that I mix into their meals or as a mid afternoon “slurp” snack. I was recently introduced to “nutrient extraction” super-blender appliances, such Nutribullet and Ninja. They make blending delicious and nutritious drinks and sauces so easy. For the dogs’ nutri-blasts, I use a handful of whatever leafy green vegetable, kale, spinach or chard, we have on hand, a few blueberries, a mix of goji berries, hemp and chia seeds, whey, and, for extra thickness, a tablespoon or so of yogurt—you can also add pulverized egg shells for more calcium. The Nutribullet grinds and mixes all these ingredients up in less than a couple of minutes. The dogs simply love it. If I have some cooked sweet potato, I add that too. The ingredient mixes are endless, plus it makes digesting vegetables easier for a dog’s digestive tract too.

For more information about the other possible health benefits of whey protein, see dogcancer.net.au

More From The Bark

Allie at the shelter
By
Claudia Kawczynska
By
Cameron Woo
By
Susan Tasaki