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Claudia Kawczynska is The Bark’s editor in chief. Cameron Woo is The Bark’s publisher.

Smiling Dog: Henry

Dog's name and age: Henry, 4 years

Adoption Story:

Several months after losing their Golden Retriever, Daisy, the family decided it was time to add another dog to their life. They were torn between getting a rescue dog or getting a Goldendoodle puppy. During a chance visit, they found a two year old Goldendoodle, Henry, available for adoption while on a trip. Of course, they fell in love with his adorable face and decided it was meant to be: a Goldendoodle who also needed a new home!

Henry's Interests:

"Henry Dancing Bear" loves going out on morning walks, playing hide-and-seek, and meeting new people. Although he's not too good with other dogs (they scare him), he loves to surround himself with people because he loves the attention.

Smiling Dog: Romero

Dog's name and age: Romero, 2 years

Adoption Story:

Struck with grief because of the passing of their beloved 15 year old dog, Roo, Romero's person visited shelters looking at dogs in need of a home. Stumbling upon Romero in a visit to her local shelter, she knew he'd be the best to help fill the gap in both her and her dog's aching hearts.

She hesitated and did not take him home with her that day because she was still grieving the loss of Roo but she could not stop thinking of Romero so she went back to the shelter to get him. Although she was afraid he would have been adopted by someone else, when she returned and saw him she knew she couldn't leave him again.

Funny Tidbits:

Romero is named after legendary zombie movie director, George A. Romero. His nicknames include "Little Man", "Little Ro", "Baby Boy" and "Little Daddy Ro". He was named Romero because it was similar to Roo to honor Roo's memory.

Dogs May Reduce Allergies and Obesity in Babies

For the past couple of decades researchers have been looking at the role that pets, especially dogs, have to play in rates of allergies in children. Many have found that, what is being termed the hygiene hypothesis, is indeed correct, meaning that a little dirt early in life helps to stave allergic diseases, including obesity.

A new study by Anita Kozyrskyj a pediatric epidemiologist of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, found further evidence of this dog-human linkage and how this lessens the development of everything from obesity to asthma.

Starting in 2013 she wondered if she could pinpoint what and how this might be happening. Her team collected fecal samples from 4-month-old infants in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) pilot study. Of the 24 respondent infants, 15 lived in house with at least a dog or cat.

What they found was that within the households with pets, the children had a higher diversity of microbes in their guts. Microbes, as we now know, can be a good thing for our gut microbiome and immune systems actually develop alongside our gut’s “germs.”  Meaning that if babies grow in a more “sterile” pet-free environment, they would be more unprepared to “fight” germs as they grow up.

Kozyrskyj noted, "The abundance of these two bacteria (Firmicutes microbes) were increased twofold when there was a pet in the house," and added that the pet exposure was shown to affect the gut microbiome indirectly—from dog to mother to unborn baby—during pregnancy as well as during the first three months of the baby's life.

Also interestingly, this study suggested that the presence of pets in the house reduced the likelihood of the transmission of vaginal GBS (group B Strep) during birth, which causes pneumonia in newborns and is prevented by giving mothers antibiotics during delivery.

Kozyrskyj’s study confirms and expands on the work that many other researchers have shown that some “dirt” can be beneficial and help to ward off disease. Including one, conducted at Kuopio University Hospital in Finland in 2012, that concentrated on infants during their first year, and investigated the effect of contact with dogs on the “frequency of respiratory symptoms and infections.” Information about the length of time a dog spent indoors was also gathered, and turned out to be one of the key indicators.

The results were eye-opening. Children with dogs at home were healthier overall, had fewer infectious respiratory problems, fewer ear infections and were less likely to require antibiotics. Researchers considered these results supportive of the theory that children who live with dogs during their early years have better resistance throughout childhood. They also found that the effect was greater if the dog spent fewer than six hours inside, possibly because the longer dogs are outdoors, the more dirt they bring inside with them. The more dirt, the more “bacterial diversity.” This diversity is thought to have a protective influence by helping the child’s immune system to mature — that is, respond more effectively to infectious agents.

Then a 2013 study conducted by the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, found that living with dogs may prevent children from developing asthma. Mice fed a solution containing dust from homes with dogs developed a resistance to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a childhood airway infectious agent. RSV, which is common in infants, is linked to a higher risk of childhood asthma. According to Dr. Susan Lynch of the study team, “Exposing the gastrointestinal tract to pet dust and other microbes early in life prepares it to respond appropriately to a variety of invaders. But since our modern lifestyles involve living in immaculate houses, our immune systems often overreact instead.” Early childhood is a critical period for developing protection against allergies and asthma, and exposure to pets can help.

The idea that our microorganisms may to some extent be collectively beneficial is intriguing. People and dogs have been exchanging microbes for at least 30,000 years, since the first little cave girl kissed the first proto-dog puppy smack on the muzzle. That’s a long history of sharing. It’s possible that our microorganisms are at least symbiotic, and perhaps even played a role in the dramatic domestication of the dog. 

As was reported in Nature: Researchers suspect that our long association with canines means that human and dog microbiomes may have developed in tandem. The microbiome of a baby growing up without a dog (and of a puppy growing up without a human) is, in a sense, incomplete. “All of the people alive today probably had ancestors who lived in tribes that hunted with dogs,” says Jack Gilbert, director of the Microbiome Center at the University of Chicago in Illinois.”

Since 2013, Canadian researcher, Kozyrskyj has expanded her pilot study from 24 to 746 infants, around half of whom were living in households with pets. Her team then compared the babies' microbial communities.

The results were basically the same, microbial life flourished in the infants living with pets. And not only that but the “team was now able to show that babies from families with pets (70% of which were dogs) had higher levels of two types of Firmicutes microbes — Ruminococcus and Oscillospira, which have been associated with a lower risk of allergic disease and leanness, respectively.

“Pet exposure can reduce allergic disease and obesity” later in life, added Hein Min Tun, a veterinarian and microbial epidemiologist and a member of Kozyrskyj’s research team.

And while it might be too soon to predict how this finding will play out in the future, they don’t rule out the concept of a “dog in a pill” as a preventive tool for allergies and obesity. Or, as we much rather see, “dog as the pill.”

Smiling Dog: Katie

Dog's name and age: Katie, 11 years

Adoption Story:

Katie's mom often went by the shelter to see the dogs in need of a home. On this particular day, after a jog, Katie was spotted in a kennel at PAWS rescue along with her sister. They greeted their soon-to-be mom with eyes that said You are my mom! She got into the kennel with them and just knew these two intended to go home with her.

Katie's Life:

Now Katie gets to enjoy napping, playing and hanging out with her mom and her sister everyday. Katie is pure love. Her health hasn't been well in the last year so her family makes sure that everyday Katie knows how much they love and treasure her! 

Smiling Dog: Saphira

Dog's name and age: Saphira, 4 years

Adoption Story:

Saphira was rescued from an unfortunate situation. She lived with drug addicts, was severely malnourished, and not cared for. Thankfully she was taken in by her new family and forever home! They have helped Saphira grow and enjoy life.

Saphira's Interests:

Saphira named after a character from the movie Eragon loves to swim, go for walks, and chase squirrels. She's known as a referee in her household, keeping an eye on her two pitbull fur-siblings when they play. When her person was diagnosed with thyroid cancer and had the surgery, Saphira was there, like a good friend. Her family loves and appreciates her.

LINK AKC—The Only Collar You May Ever Need
SPONSORED
LinkAKC Collar

All of us have had that sinking feeling when we are out walking our leashless dogs—they go around a bend, up a hill and in a blink of an eye, they are gone! Even an adventure-loving dog with “spot on” recall can quickly become a lost dog. Now wearable technology can bring a huge dose of peace of mind with the new LINK AKC collar.

Not only can this collar track your dog’s location with its fast and reliable, built-in GPS but you can even set up a virtual fence that you define so if your dog wanders off (or digs under a fence or jumps one) the system will alert you with a notification.

Like the popular wearable technology for humans, this collar can also be used as an activity tracker (a good way to check up on how much activity your stay-at-home dog gets from your dog walker). It will even send you a personalized recommendation for scaling up (or down) the activity level based on your dog’s age, weight, breed type. Plus, it has a temperature sensor to alert you if the environment your dog is in gets too hot or cold.

LinkAKC GPS Collar

This collar can also provide you with a handy positive reinforcement tool, similar to a clicker, just by a tap on the phone; and it even has a light to help you and your dog navigate in the dark (or to help locate your dog).

You can then use the “Adventure” feature to turn your backwoods jaunt into a virtual scrapbook, that will generate maps and timestamps for your photos so you can share it on social media.

Plus, not only does this LINK AKC collar pack a load of high tech features—tracking, health stats, sensors, training aid—it’s smart looking too with a sleek, stylish and comfy look. The LINK AKC collar isn’t the first in the market but it is the first in the number of smart features it offers and its ease of use and good design.

Smiling Dog: David
Dog's name and age: David, 9 years
 
Adoption Story:
David's pregnant mother was abandoned when her humans moved away from their home in Talking Rock, GA. Thankfully, the nextdoor neighbor noticed and was able to foster mother and all her pups (including David) until ready for adoption. After a successful foster, David was put up for adoption and found his forever home.
 
David's Interests:
He loves to bask in the sun at Altoon Pass after a good hike and swim. He enjoys being outside with his humans on hikes and visiting grandma at a nearby retirement community.
Smiling Dog: Chester

What’s your dog’s name and age? Chester, 2 years

Nicknames: Chessy, Bud, Booger Butt and Smiley

Adoption Story:

After starting a search for the perfect pup pal Chester's person headed over to her local shelter. She spotted little Chester in an restricted area and inquired about his history. Turns out he was recently picked up as a stray along with another dog, found alone in a secluded wooded area. Fortunately, Chester became available for adoption that day and his partner had already found a home. After meeting Chester she knew he was the one and they instantly connected!

Chester's Interests:

Chester loves to go hiking, head to the dog park, and play chase with anyone who will follow. Once he's found a ball there's no getting that ball out of his mouth unless you have a treat to swap! His mom says Chester is always smiling and always so happy and can brighten anyone's day.

 

Smiling Dog: Steve

What’s your dog’s name and age? Steve, 7 years

Adoption Story:

Found walking along the street with another dog in Ft. Worth, Texas he was picked up by a good Samaritan. After effort to locate an owner failed, Steve's fate seemed doomed to the animal shelter. The rescuer called up his friend thinking he and Steve might be a good fit and upon meeting they were instantly best friends. 

Steve's Interests:

Steve loves scratches behind the ear, eating chicken and the song "Free Bird".  When Steve isn't grooving to the music, he can be found hanging out with his best pal Snickers the beagle or snuggling with his people. He is an unparalleled hugger.

Leasing a Dog Is a Really Bad Idea
Leasing Golden Retriever Puppies Is a Bad Idea

We heard about an intriguing (and alarming) Bloomberg story over the weekend on NPR’s Marketplace Money program. When asked about predictions for what the guests are “long or short" on, reporter Gillian White said that she was “long” on the financial sector behind “dog leasing.” She was reporting on a piece from Bloomberg about dubious loan scheme operations, such as leasing a dog. In the Bloomberg piece, “I’m Renting a Dog?” Patrick Clark reports about Wags Lending LLC, a California-based firm, that provides leasing options for people who want to buy expensive pet store dogs.

In one of the examples he cites a couple in San Diego purchased a Golden Retriever pup for $2,400, agreeing to pay for the dog with 34 monthly payments of $165.06, bringing the true cost to be $5,800. As White noted that this kind of “leasing operation, taps into the growing trend of consumers who want things but who don’t necessary want to own things.” Added to that is the wish for instant gratification and the fact that most people don’t take the time to read the fine print on things especially when making emotional purchases, like “buying” a dog. Simple fact, many people just want what they want when they want it. And because these leasing companies aren’t subject to the same kind of regulations as loans or even credit cards are, they are able to charge really high interest rates, which range from about 36 percent to 170 percent on an annualized basis! And if you renege of the payment schedule, they are repossess the dog, that's right, they can take the rental dog back. Bristlecone Holding LLC, the company behind this Wags Lending scheme, leases things like furniture, wedding dresses and hearing aids, and the list is growing—but it all started with the dogs. The mission statement from the aptly named, Dusty Wunderlich the CEO behind these companies notes that he is “living in a Postmodern culture while maintaining my old American West roots and Christian values.” Heavens, we need Senator Elizabeth Warren’s Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s attention on this one fast. Amazing that they can get away with this. Wunderlich also adds that, “We like niches where we’re dealing with emotional borrowers.” Such as those who are staring into the eyes of a pet shop puppy, obviously.

The idea behind Wags Lending came about in 2013, and as the Bloomberg article notes, when Wunderlich “recruited a former hedge fund salesman named Kyle Ferguson as co-founder and launched Wags Lending, thinking dog leases would mark just the first step in a vertically integrated pet-financing company that would eventually include food deliveries, chew-toy subscriptions, and veterinary loans. Then their point-of-sale lease financing became a hit, and they decided to double down on it.” So beware if you happen to stumble upon any of their other “too good to be true” plans! We are seeing more and more of these “point-of-sale” options in the pet sector, especially at vet offices.

So the lesson behind this is a simple one, first of all, do NOT ever ever buy dogs at pet stores, there are many reasons, besides shady lending schemes to not buy a pet shop dog, including that most of those dogs are supplied to pet stores come from puppy mills and buying such dogs only supports those horrible businesses. But even more importantly, there are many wonderful dogs at shelters or with rescue groups and every dog that is purchased at a pet store means another dog just might be euthanized to make room for another dog. That constant intake flow has to stop. Again, read the small print and know what you are getting yourself into before signing up for any of these leasing products. See the Bloomberg piece for the whole story.

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