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Between a Dog and a Hard Place
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By midday, Ballengee had become very lethargic. When Taz returned from his longest journey yet, he wagged his tail and gulped water from the small water hole on which Ballengee had come to rely. “I figured maybe he had a nice run and was just happy to be back. I gave him a little pat—and then I heard the sound of an engine. He knew that someone was coming… he knew before I did.”

The rescue team arrived and worked quickly, strapping Ballengee to a stretcher in preparation for being airlifted to a hospital in Grand Junction.“The dog took our rescue personnel right to her,” Brewer says. “I think we would have eventually found her because we were in the right location, but the dog saved us some time. And that was important, because if it had gotten dark, that would have complicated things. And it wound up snowing later that night, too.”

He spent that day running off and returning, each trek seemingly longer than the last. After surgery to repair her broken pelvis and an extensive rehabilitation, Ballengee made a full recovery. By late spring this year, she and Taz were once again trail-running, albeit a little more cautiously, and in May, Taz received the National Hero Dog Award from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Los Angeles.

“It’s pretty amazing, what he did,” Ballengee says.“We figured he must have run about 15 miles when he led the rescuers to me.He definitely helped save my life.”But it might have been a case of one good turn generating another: Taz was repaying Ballengee for rescuing him.

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This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 44: Sep/Oct 2007

Photo: Mark Doolittle

CommentsPost a Comment
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Submitted by http://knowyour... | April 12 2011 |

Another great story about how dog's really do save peoples lives. Thankfully Taz knew what he was doing, and was not going to quit until he brought help. I believe he is truly a hero.

Submitted by Russell Hartstein | August 10 2012 |

Just another example how dogs improve and save human lives! Russell Hartstein CPDT dog training Miami

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