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Karen B. London
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Burglar Goes Through Doggy Door
Homeowner shoots the intruder

 

The great thing about dog doors is that they allow access in and out of your home. That is also their biggest drawback. A man entered a home in Oklahoma City through a dog door, apparently with the intent of robbing it, but instead, he was shot by the owner of the house. Though he got away, he was later apprehended at a convenience store when the clerk saw that he had been shot and called 911. Officers responding to the call realized he fit the description of the intruder who had gone through the dog door.
 
Obviously, if a medium to large dog can fit through a dog door, so can many people. For many years, I was among the smallest children in my neighborhood, and that, combined with the skills from being a gymnast, made me the go-to person when people were locked out of their houses. Over the years, I was shoved through various windows and asked to crawl through even tiny dog doors to get inside and unlock a door to let the owners back in. As recently as last year and at my adult height of 5’7”, I crawled through a neighbor’s dog door to help out when their front door lock mechanism was broken. I’ve always considered dog doors the easiest way to enter a house, and far preferable to, for example, going head first through a bathroom window and landing in a handstand in the tub.
 
Have you ever crawled through a dog door out of necessity? Have you ever had an unwanted intruder gain access to your house in this way?
 

 

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Bark columnist and a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist specializing in the evaluation and treatment of serious behavior problems in the domestic dog.

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Submitted by SaraG | January 8 2011 |

I had a raccoon come in through my dog door. And I have heard others tell the same story. Rats are another big problem where I live, and so I've retired my dog door.

Submitted by Cindy A | January 8 2011 |

I LOVE my dog door and can't imagine life without the convenience it brings. As far as I know, there have never been any unwanted visitors but a neighborhood stray cat has almost figured it out once or twice.

Submitted by Brenda F | January 8 2011 |

We had a very friendly squirrel one summer and she jumped through the dog door once because she wanted her peanuts. Luckily my dog was on the other side and scared the squirrel back out the dog door.

Submitted by Durham Greyhoun... | January 8 2011 |

I once knew an indoor/outdoor cat who was put on a diet. Since he wasn't getting what he thought was enough grub at his house, he entered the pet door of the next door neighbors for a little midnight snack (they had kitties too).

The next morning, he was caught red handed as the neighbors woke up to find the fat and happy cat fast asleep on their couch!

Submitted by Anonymous | January 8 2011 |

I closed mine when my cat proudly presented me with a huge snake.

Submitted by dogsrule | January 8 2011 |

I knew someone who had a skunk come through the dog door and they were held hostage standing still (for fear of being sprayed) in the kitchen for a very tense hour and a half till he finally crawled back out.
If a dog can get through anyone and anything can.

Submitted by dogsrule | January 8 2011 |

I knew someone who had a skunk come through the dog door and they were held hostage standing still (for fear of being sprayed) in the kitchen for a very tense hour and a half till he finally crawled back out.
If a dog can get through anyone and anything can.

Submitted by Celeste | January 13 2011 |

We have the biggest dog door we could find, that would fit our Anatolian Shepherd. I figure if a thief is stupid enough to go through a dog door THAT BIG, then he deserves whatever he has coming to him. In this case, a 150 lb, very loud, very toothy Anatolian.

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