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Colter: The True Story of the Best Dog I Ever Had

If you haven’t read Colter, you’re in luck, because you still have it to look forward to. Written by Rick Bass, Colter is the “true story of the best dog” he ever had, a German Shorthaired Pointer, the runt of the litter who blooms into a genius of a hunting dog.

When Bass adopts Colter, the dog is “bony, cross-legged, pointy-headed, goofy-looking.” But the ungainly young dog shows surprising potential. Bass engages a field trainer, who molds him into the great hunting dog he was born to be.

The “brown bomber” becomes a topnotch pointing dog, and Bass marvels in his flawless execution as he goes “on lock-solid, drop-dead point … head and shoulders hunched and crouched, bony ass stuck way up in the air, body halftwisted, frozen, as if cautioning us of some hidden deadly betrayal: and green eyes afire, stub tail motionless.”

However, Bass can’t hit a bird, which frustrates Colter excessively. He takes to shrieking when the shotgun fires and no bird falls. Bass can live with his poor aim: “In bird hunting … one little window of dog perfection, one wedge of success, thirty seconds of grace, is enough to obliterate al l the errors of a lifetime.” However, he hates his ineptitude for his dog’s sake. Occasionally—by accident, he says—he hits one; he finally enrolls in a shooting school in hopes of improving his aim. He does, much to Colter’s joy.

As all dog stories ultimately do, this one ends sadly. To love a dog entails the risk of loss. We pay this price, and dearly. However, anyone who has ever loved a dog will agree that the risk is worth taking, for the love of a dog is priceless. The same can be said of Colter: it may make us sad but is well worth the reading.

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This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 64: Apr/May 2011
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