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Communication, Friendship, and Respect:
A conversation on pets with Heidi Roizen
Heidi Roizen and Ruby

We welcome once again as a guest blogger, Carol Novello, Humane Society of Silicon Valley President. In this post Carol talks with Heidi Roizen, a Venture Capitalist, and a great animal lover. They talk about the communication, friendship and respect they have for pets. We also congratulate Carol and the HSSV for their very successful benefit event, the Annual Fur Ball, held on April 12. They broke all records this year and raised an amazing $885,000!!—Editor's Note.

Humane Society Silicon Valley friend and supporter, Heidi Roizen, is currently an Operating Partner at Draper Fisher Jurvetson (DFJ), a leading global venture capital firm in Menlo Park, CA. A Silicon Valley native, who grew up in Palo Alto and Portola Valley, attended Leigh High School in San Jose and received her undergraduate and MBA degrees from Stanford University, Roizen always had animals growing up. Her family always owned a dog. There was Tippy—a Chihuahua mix—who wasn’t the friendliest dog, but still lovable. Then came a terrier mix named Buffy who was a very smart dog with a dramatic under bite.

It wasn’t until she married that she adopted her own dog, a German Shepherd mix named Rocket. “The first thing we did was get a dog,” said Roizen. “Rocket was a fantastic dog, and Ramjet, who we adopted from Humane Society Silicon Valley six months later, was her sidekick. I really believe Rocket was a human in a dog’s body. Rocket could really communicate with you about what her needs were. Ramjet, on the other hand, was very much looking out for number one. He was a truant, who would frequently sneak out of our yard, roam down the street to the local high school and watch the students have lunch.” Roizen further recalled one instance where Ramjet escaped and crashed a New Year’s Eve party. “We went to a well attended Millennium party nearby and to our surprise, we found Ramjet sitting on stage while the live band played. The next day, his stunt was featured in San Jose Mercury News New Year’s Eve party photos.”

Today, Roizen, with her daughter, Marleyna, have a nearly nine-year-old German Shorthaired Pointer/Doberman mix named Ruby while her college-aged son, Sabel, who resides in Seattle, cares for Max, a Golden Retriever/St. Bernard mix. “Ruby almost died right after we adopted her,” remembers Roizen. Ruby had acquired a virus the day after she was adopted. The vet put her on antibiotics and advised Roizen to hold her, keep her warm, and feed her chicken broth. “Because of this early bonding experience, she truly loves me in a very special way. I’m definitely Mommy,” says Roizen.

So when asked what her animals have taught her and her family about compassion, awareness, and wisdom, Roizen replied, “They teach us so much. They are so non-judgmental, and they have a much higher emotional intelligence than people give them credit. When I went through my divorce, my dogs knew. They knew when I was upset, and they were really there for me. I find that even just looking at Ruby, or thinking about her, can be calming. When I need to conjure up an image that makes me happy without having to think too much, it’s of my dog, Ruby.”

What also makes Roizen happy is her “Ruby Cam,” a live-stream camera that monitors Ruby in her usual spot by the front window. Roizen embraces living in this fast paced, high technology era and the instant digital gratification it provides when it comes to her dog. “Ruby is a proud user of technology even if she doesn’t know it. It allows me to check up on her when I’m not at home.  She is a fierce protector, my ‘fur security,’ but it gives me peace to see her on the Ruby Cam.  I know not only that is she okay, the house is okay, too.”

In terms of how her pets have influenced her leadership skills and how she interacts with people, Roizen says, “At some level, dogs are so simple and basic. At our core, people are simple and basic too. We all want to be loved, have friendship, feel safe—fulfilling our basic needs are the most important. When you get so wrapped up in the complexities of life in Silicon Valley, it’s important to reflect on how content our dogs are and what that teaches us. I think about the basic needs; I think about the sense of respect. I treat Ruby with respect, and I treat people with respect. There shouldn’t be any difference.”

 

In an effort to help enhance and save lives, Roizen is an ongoing Humane Society Silicon Valley supporter. As for DFJ, they have an annual "Take Your Dog to Work Day" in the fall.

 

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