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Coneheads
The pros and cons of wearing a lampshade
Bev Sparks' dog, Eddie, demonstrates one of the benies of cones--eliciting sympathy, which can lead to cuddles.

At some point in your life with dogs, you’ll most likely shepherd them through the challenges and indignities of an Elizabethan cone. The awkward plastic neck collar—sometimes called a “cone of shame”—is often the final insult following painful hot spots, surgery and injury. The fact that it’s for dogs’ own good (keeping them from licking and biting irritated areas) is little comfort as they crash noisily into doors and chairs or struggle to retrieve a ball that’s right there. You’re sympathetic but you laugh—making matters worse. Still it’s hard not too: The sweet face framed in plastic like a confused pistil at the center of a tulip.

 
There are lots of funny pictures and silly videos of dogs in cones across the web but a short, sweet photo series recently posted by Seattle-based dog photographer and friend Bev Sparks explores the upside (toy scooping and sniff amplifying) and downside (poor defense) of cones with a kind heart that preserves her dog Eddie’s dignity while delighting in the strange headgear.
 
Do you have a great shot of your dog in a cone? Send it our way.

 

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Lisa Wogan lives in Seattle and is the author of, most recently, Dog Park Wisdom. lisawogan.com

Photo by Bev Sparks.

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