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Criminal Mistake
Running into K9 training
Multiple police dogs not a welcome sight for suspects

I love stupid criminal stories. My favorite is about a guy who robbed a liquor store. When the clerk asked for ID because he looked young and was taking beer, the thief presented his driver’s license. This made it easier for the police to apprehend him, in case you were wondering. Similarly, I like the one about the man holding up a bank who wrote his demands on the back of his personal deposit slip, which allowed police to go to his house to arrest him. Of course, he might not feel as stupid as the crook who pulled a trash bag over his face at the start of a robbery only to realize he’d forgotten to cut eye holes in it.

 
Recently, two guys in the state of Washington fled their vehicle on foot after a high-speed chase by police. Whoops. The suspects ran right into a monthly training exercise of 15 police officers and their canine partners. Some of these dogs were trained drug-sniffers, and they indicated that there was the possibility of narcotics in the bags the men carried. After a search warrant was obtained, police found $1.2 million dollars worth of cocaine.
 
Police Dogs 1: Criminals 0
 

 

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer who specializes in working with dogs with serious behavioral problems, including aggression. She is the author of five books on canine training and behavior.

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