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Karen B. London
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Dog Fire Hydrant
It adds to the town’s beauty

Dogs and art both dress up a city, and when they are combined, the charm is more than doubled. That’s why I was so pleased when I spotted this fire hydrant painted to look like a dog with a firefighter’s hat in West Jefferson, North Carolina. I already liked the area, and this discovery added to my warm feelings about it. It’s not everyone’s style, to be sure, but I like the whimsical look.

I spent some time watching the fire hydrant while sitting on a nearby bench. Though I saw a few people—certainly tourists like me—stop to admire it, I did not see a single dog sniff it or mark it. In this town, there were not a lot of dogs walking around, so the fire hydrant was not serving as a place to mark.

The real purpose of fire hydrants, of course, is to provide water in the event of fire and they are therefore important safety tools. Some people object to painting fire hydrants for fun because it may make them harder to find in an emergency. They are usually red or yellow in order to be easily seen, though the Dalmatian is one of the most common themes when they are painted as an art form.

Are there dog fire hydrants in your area?

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Bark columnist and a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist specializing in the evaluation and treatment of serious behavior problems in the domestic dog.

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