Home
Activities & Sports
Print|Email|Text Size: ||
Dog Paddling
Pages:

Pages

If canoe-camping with your dog isn’t postcard-perfect on the first try, don’t give up. Skip the campout, perhaps, and take a relaxing low-key afternoon paddle together. Most dogs would rather do anything than be left behind, and with patience and time, you’ll be rewarded with a seasoned traveling companion.

Our reasons for taking the dogs boil down to simple truisms. They love the river, anything we do is more fun when they’re around, and there are lessons to learn when we pay more attention to them than to ourselves. It’s possible, like Maggie, to be wet and muddy yet act like a lady. And, like Truman, it’s good to wag your entire body with joy now and then.

In the morning we break camp and point the bow downstream. We’ll return to witness the fiery pageant of autumn, and again when the river comes alive in spring. For now, we watch our Labs flick their tails back and forth as they drift along with the slow-moving current. As the thought crosses my mind, Brian says it aloud: “It’s a good day to be a dog.”

Pages:

Pages

Print|Email
This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 31: Summer 2005
Andi Marie Cantele is the author of Backroad Bicycling in Western Massachusetts and 52 Weekends in Connecticut (both from Countryman Press), among others; she lives in Connecticut.

More From The Bark

© Ruffwear/Ben Moon Foto
By
Jayme Moye
By
Andi Marie Cantele
By
The Bark
More in Activities & Sports:
Teaching Your Dog Obedience and Rally-O
The Politics of Creating a Dog Park
Hiking the Sierra
Indoor Athletics For Your Dog
Snow Play
How much exercise does your dog need?
7 Activities for a Bad-Weather Day
Canine Yoga
Working Out With Your Dog