Home
Lifestyle
Print|Text Size: ||
Dogs Prefer Petting Over Praise
Study looks at what canines find reinforcing.
Whenever I talk to people who are facing a dog training challenge, I always ask questions about the reward they're offering for the desired behavior. Often roadblocks can be overcome by increasing the frequency of the reward (and by making the exercise easier). For instance, if you're trying to reduce leash pulling, you might help your dog earn more rewards by reducing the distraction level (by moving further away from enticing dogs) or breaking down behaviors and acknowledging small successes (such as a head turn in your direction).

In addition to the number of rewards you give, it's also important to understand what is most motivating to your pup. For my Sheltie, Nemo, food is his number one reward, followed by toys, but for my Border Collie, Scuttle, it's the opposite.

Because I consider understanding rewards so essential, I was excited to see that Dr. Erica Feuerbacher and her team at the University of Florida is doing research on this topic.

Their latest study looks at how dogs respond to different interactions with people, verbal and physical (petting). Their "test subjects" included a mix of shelter dogs and non-shelter pups, and the humans giving attention included strangers and owners. The team found that across all groups and situations, the dogs showed a preference for petting over verbal interactions by staying near the person longer during petting sessions. The pups showed significantly less proximity seeking behavior with the verbal interactions, similar to the control sessions with no interaction at all. They also found that the dogs never seemed to tired of being pet.

Erica and her team believe that petting is an important interaction between dogs and humans that may maintain inter-species social behavior. Vocal interaction, on the other hand, is something that needs to be conditioned. I definitely see this in my training. A "good boy" or "yes!," usually garners a response from my pups, but I believe it's because they know a treat usually follows the words (similar to the way you'd condition a click with a treat in clicker training).

Previous research from Erica's team showed that animals preferred food to being touched. I think most pups would agree with those findings!

What's your dog's number one reward?

 

Print

JoAnna Lou is a New York City-based researcher, writer and agility enthusiast.

Photo by Eunice/flickr.

More From The Bark

More in Lifestyle:
Dog Walk Encounters: Give My Dog Space!
Can Anybody Care for Your Dog Like You Do?
Pack Dog: Five Reasons My Dog Wears a Backpack
In Lieu of Gifts: Humane Giving
Astronaut Leland Melvin's Dogs
Best Practices for a Canine-Friendly Workplace
AZ Bill Aims to Protect Dogs in Hot Cars
A Ninety-Pound Dachshund Mix
Pet and House Sitting Exchange
Canine Doormats