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Hiking with a Dog in Oregon
Here’s a guide for you

I live in the Northwest, where we love to grouse about our rainy, gray weather. But as summer warms up (finally!), it’s satisfying to know it won’t heat up so much that I can’t take my dogs hiking—one of our favorite activities. There are only a few days a year along the coast of Oregon and Washington, when mornings and evenings, at least, aren’t cool enough for trekking.

Finding hikes that are good for dogs isn’t always as easy as it sounds so when I break into new terrain, I regularly rely on Mountaineers BooksBest Hikes with Dogs. (Full disclosure: I’ve written two books for Mountaineers, so I may be a little biased. I’ve seen their dog-passion from the inside, which includes several pups flopping around their Seattle office).

That said, the books in this series do an excellent job of selecting from among many hikes, routes that are a particularly good match for dogs, and that’s what I’m after. What’s a good hike for a dog? It should have ample shade on the trail; streams, rivers or lakes for cooling off; no livestock, packhorses or off-road vehicles; minimal or no poison oak or ivy; trails that are easy on dog paws; few or no treacherous cliffs; few crowds; and, finally, where possible, no leash requirement. I’m happy there are dog-loving hikers who will face the disappointment of a hike gone awry to find trails that meet these criteria.

In the case of Mountaineers’ recent guide, Best Hikes with Dogs: Oregon, 2nd edition, Ellen Morris Bishop enlisted three canine trail testers to vet 76 hikes around the state. I’ve sampled a few in the book—Sandy River Delta, Forest Park Wildwood Trail, Wahclella Falls and Elk Meadows Trail on Mount Hood—and can attest that they deserve to be included. Bishop is concise and thorough with her directions and advice (there are maps and black and white photos as well) but I love how she manages to see the trail from the dog’s perspective, pointing out where a pup might be bewitched by scat or an ant nest and warning about zippy mountain bikes or children. I have dog-eared (what a perfect word) several pages for hikes we want to tackle next time we’re in the state. I can’t wait.

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Lisa Wogan lives in Seattle and is the author of, most recently, Dog Park Wisdom. lisawogan.com

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