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Hot Dog
Doing Double Duty as a Therapy Dog
Dog in highchair

The day I brought my puppy home to Manhattan, a giant article appeared in The New York Times reducing him to a fashion accessory. Headline news: Boston Terriers, dogs for the hipper-than-thou. But I didn’t get my little guy to lift my social status. I got him to lift my father’s spirits—and add quality to the time he had left.

A note to my husband Geoff and me lay on the nightstand in our spare bed­room, where my father slept on chemo days.

Dear Kids,
Thanks for your hospitality.
Sorry about soiling the sheets.
Love,Dad
P.S. A baby or a puppy, I don’t care.

Of course he cared.

He wanted a grandchild, but he didn’t have nine months, and he knew it. The postscript on the note revealed another truth of my father’s heart: Second to grandchildren, puppies are the greatest gift.

My husband lobbied for a Husky. Taxis don’t belong in the mountains, I told him, and sled dogs don’t belong in the city.

“Then a German Shepherd,” he said. “German Shepherds will take a bullet for you.”

Clearly, we had different priorities in the dog department. He was thinking work dog. He was thinking guard dog. I was thinking lap dog.

In the end, we agreed on a breed by marital compromise.

The fairest approach was to go with my father’s preference. He kept a wea­thered photograph of a Boxer in his wallet, the pet of his Brooklyn boyhood who fetched lost baseballs from under the stoop and ate the broccoli his mother thought he’d finished.

“Boxers fart,” Geoff said.

At least we were talking about some­thing other than cancer.

The dog talk let us be ourselves again.

We settled on Boston Terriers because they resembled Boxers—barrel-chested stance, erect ears and short shiny coat. And apropos of my father’s nature, Boston Terriers epitomized the all-American spirit of the people. That’s what the dog book said.

Picking out a puppy is like house hunting or wedding-dress shopping. You know in your gut when you’ve found the right one. The rescues at The Queens Animal Shelter didn’t warm up to us. At the kennel in New Jersey, the litter had worms. Then a listing on the Internet caught my eye. The breeder lived upstate, near Buffalo. I convinced Geoff to make the trek.

“I called the woman. Her name is Glenda. She has the bitch. Her daughter has the sire. Guess what her daughter’s name is? Jo-lene. Nine hundred people live in their town. Glenda’s husband Harry fixes machine parts.”

Geoff didn’t see why any of this mattered.

“These are the kind of people who have a boat on the lawn,” I said, “the kind of people who know from dogs.”

We met Glenda Hartman at the dirt road that led to her house. A fallen tree blocked the drive path, so we parked and followed Glenda on foot, up the hill. “That’s my son, sawing the branch,” she told us, and a brawny boy of about 19 tipped his baseball cap in our direction.

“You and Harry have how many children?” I asked, trying to get her to like me.

“Six kids and 16 Boston Terriers,” she said. “Harry will tell you about the pups. He’s out back taking the tarp off the boat.”

I winked at Geoff.

Harry washed down the boat and a six-pack of Michelob. One pup bolted out the screen door to greet Geoff and me. “Only fair I knock $100 off his asking price,” Harry said.

We couldn’t imagine why.

Harry Hartman explained as only Harry Hartman could: “One of his little gonads didn’t come down yet.”

Geoff named our puppy “Iverson,” after Allen Iverson, the point guard on the Philadelphia 76ers, because he’s black with one white sleeve like the basketball player in his signature armband.

“Iverson’s a champion,” I say, when he poops on the newspaper.

Geoff beams. “We don’t call him Iverson for nothing.” The NBA’s Iverson was an MVP.

When I’m working from home, the puppy jockeys for space on my desk chair. His wide-set eyes and the white blaze between them give him a quiz­zical expression. How can you be sad, he seems to wonder, looking up at me. Then he plunks his chin on my knee and lets out a sigh.

If I try to crawl back into bed, he woos me with impish charm. He runs around the living room with the handle of my hairbrush in his mouth. For the love of liver treats, he learns “roll over.” Since my father’s diagnosis, I’ve been trying to make everything okay and thanks to my Boston Terrier, some­times it is.

My father recently spent an entire month in the hospital. He’d exhausted all treatment options. He couldn’t walk, was fed through a tube, spoke in a whis­per. I arrived early one morning to visit him, the two of us alone in the stark room.

“Get me out of here,” he said.

I readied the wheelchair for a trip to the recreation pavilion.

“That’s where we’ll tell the nurses we’re going,” my father schemed and pulled out his intravenous lines. “Wheel me out the side door. Hail us a cab to your apartment.”

An untenable plan, I told him. He’d been prone to falls. His painkillers might wear off. The hospital could refuse to treat him over a stunt like this. “No way, Dad. I love you,” I said, “but there’s too much at stake.”

My father, a meatpacker, a Marine, macho personified, wept into his hand­kerchief. “I’ve been dreaming for weeks,” he gasped, “of playing with the puppy on a big bed.”

I did what a compassionate daughter ought to do. I helped him into his shoes.

“Do you know who this is?” my father said when I put Iverson in his arms. “This is my grand-dog.” He scratched the black diamond on Iverson’s belly. He bundled Iverson in a blanket and watched him tunnel out. Iverson licked his cheeks wet with kisses. The puppy didn’t see a sick man. He saw a smiling face. And I saw a Boston Terrier keeping my father from fading away.

My dog is no trendy trapping of urban swank. He’s way too cool for that. 

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This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 32: Fall 2005
Pari Chang is a former attorney who has written essays for The New York Times, Glamour and Self.

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