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If I Judged Canine Charm Contests
Winners would have one ear up and one ear down

There are as many ways to be adorable as there are dogs in the world, but for my money, the dogs with one ear up and one ear down are the crème de la crème of cuteness. There is something so charming—and disarming—about a dog who is asymmetrical in this way, especially if it is combined with a head cock to further the effect. The ears-askew look can make even the roughest, toughest, most intimidating-looking dog appear totally harmless, and for dogs who already appear to pose no threat, it makes them even more lovable.

So, why do so many dogs have one ear up and one ear down? In some cases, it is a young dog whose ears are part of the way through the process of growing into an erect posture. They have not done it evenly so one ear is further along than the other. The cartilage in the ears is soft, but usually grows strong enough to support the ear as the puppy develops. Some dogs permanently remain in the one-ear-up, one-ear-down phase of life.

Many dogs only have one ear up and one ear down temporarily. It may just happen briefly when the dog has moved the ears in different ways. There are dogs who only have one ear up and one ear down when they are in certain emotional states. Other, naturally flop-eared dogs, show this look only when they are actively pricking their ears because they are especially alert, but only one ear fully extends. Some dogs only do it when they are tired, especially at the end of the day.

Many people worry about dogs whose ears are not a matched set, and it is certainly reasonable to discuss it with your veterinarian to rule out any medical issues. That’s especially true if both of your dog’s ears are typically erect and one suddenly changes positions. Sometimes, a hematoma or an infection can add weight to the ear and cause it to flop, for example. People who are showing their dogs in conformation consider it a problem because many breed standards require a dog to have erect ears. For the rest of us, there are no requirements about what dogs look like, and many consider this particular look a bonus in the cuteness department

Do you have a dog whose good looks are made even more endearing by asymmetrical ears?

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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer who specializes in working with dogs with serious behavioral problems, including aggression. She is the author of five books on canine training and behavior.

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