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Interview with Sue Halpern
Author of A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home
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Sue Halpern

In 2009, her daughter away at school and husband traveling the world for work, Sue Halpern found herself in a quiet home, and restless. Pransky, her seven-year-old dog, was bored. Both were ready for a new engagement. Halpern wondered: could Pransky call on her Labrador and Poodle roots and become a service dog? Could they work together to bring joy to some new corner of their world?

Author of five books and dozens of articles for leading publications, Halpern turned to an expansive library, delving into everything from Aristotle to Temple Grandin. After a rigorous—and occasionally hilarious—training regimen, the two became a certified therapy team and soon were making weekly rounds at a local nursing home. Halpern recounts the story in her new book, A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher. She spoke to Annik La Farge about their adventure.

Annik La Farge: Your book left me interested in putting my own dog to work as a therapy dog. What advice would you give us? How does a person know if she and her dog will make a good team?

Sue Halpern: For years, I thought Pransky would make an excellent therapy dog because she was smart, attentive, open and loving, which are necessary attributes, but I also knew that she was a bit too playful. I had to wait until I knew I could absolutely count on her to do the right thing— to not go frolicking down the hall if I accidentally dropped her leash, for instance. She always had the right temperament, she just had to grow into it completely, which seemed to happen when she was around five. I think you’ll know, instinctively, if your dog will do well in a therapeutic setting because you’ve watched him or her interact with people of all ages, sizes and conditions. Pransky has always been one of those dogs who sits patiently while small children pull her tail. And she never jumps up on people. Jumping is a therapy-dog sin.

La Farge: At the heart of this book is the idea that dogs love—and even need—to work, just as humans do. Pransky was a bit bored before she found her calling as a therapy dog; how did working change things for her, and what turned out to be her special gift?

Halpern: Pransky is a social animal, like most dogs. She loves to be around people and she loves to be around dogs, but most of the time, she just gets to be around me, which is not so interesting. When I say, “Today is a work day!” or “Do you want to get dressed for work?” she perks up and gets quite excited. Tuesday, the day we go to the nursing home, orients her week. I don’t know if it would be too anthropomorphic to say that she looks forward to it, but it sure seems so. Her special gift—and I’d argue that this is not really special to her, but to all therapy dogs, which doesn’t make it any less special—is the joy she brings with her and spreads around. Pransky is an enthusiast. She’s always happy to see you. Her (self-controlled) exuberance is infectious.

La Farge: Death is a constant presence in a nursing home, and you write about it with real poignancy. How does it affect Pransky?

Halpern: On a day-to-day basis, I don’t think it does affect her. But when someone is actively dying— a situation we’ve only encountered three times in four years—her compassion is visible. It’s something I write about in the book, and something I’ve found quite moving. Most of the time, though, she’s unconcerned by people’s infirmities, which is a gift. She lets people be their essential selves, which has nothing to do with being sick or being old. When they’re with her, they can forget that they had a stroke or have diabetes or a heart condition.

La Farge: I loaned your book to a friend who works with dogs for a living. Interestingly, what most captivated her was your description of life in a nursing home; she was relieved to see this institution, which fills most of us with dread, humanized— and by a dog, no less. What’s the takeaway here for institutions, and for professionals who care for the sick and aging?

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Submitted by Patty Aarons | June 15 2013 |

OH WOW!!! Sue Halpern has said it all so elequently -- as she always does. I had to wait until my Skye Girl (Bernese Mountain Dog)was 5 (and settled enough)before I could even begin my long time dream of our succeeding as a Therapy Dog Team. After our training and certification, we began with Children's Story Hours at local libraries and then added visits to a nursing home/assisted living facility with some trepedation. I underestimated my Skye (and possibly myself). We are into our second year of one on one "in room" visits and I wouldn't trade my experiences for anything. Skye brings smiles to ALL and absolutely understands when I pick up my tote and her TD vest that we are going to "work!" She races for the door. Her canine sibs know that this is not their thing and, somewhat grudgingly, retire to a spot where they can watch for our return. Skye and I have had a couple "AH HA" moments with amazing reactions of residents to her presence. We are in the process of making available a reading to dogs program at one libray and have all paws crossed that there will be sufficient interest for it to be continued through the school year. Good Job "Bark". ALL your articles are so VERY timely. Thank You ~~ Patty Aarons

Submitted by Carrie Wheaton | October 6 2013 |

My friend runs a non-profit for assistance dogs and we are frequently traveling to interview or deliver dogs to people in need. We listened to an audio version of your book on two trips to a very sad situation. Thanks to you we were able to laugh, a lot, and get some comic relief from one of life's more difficult journeys. Your gift is very much appreciated.

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