Home
Lifestyle
Print|Text Size: ||
Mood Harness for Dogs
Japanese biologist develops an algorithm to decode your pup's feelings.
Remember mood rings from when you were a kid? Now dogs have their own version--a mood harness.

As a pet lover I always want to better understand what my pups are thinking. Alhough these mood harnesses seem fun, I'm not sure they'll actually help you decode your pup.

The harness, called Inupathy ("inu" means dog in Japanese), was invented by biologist Joji Yamaguchi. It measures the dog's heart rate and uses an algorithm to indicate different moods through a colored LED light. Red means excited or anxious, blue for relaxed, white for focused, and rainbow for happy.

Joji also developed an app to help you interact with your pup based on the colors. For instance, if you want to try and turn your dog's harness rainbow colored, you can launch a "Let's Play" app on your smartphone, which will suggest games to play with your dog. It can also track "average happiness" and provide a daily, weekly, and monthly analysis of your dog's emotional state over time. They also plan on making their software development kit available so developers can make their own fun apps to interact with the data.

While I see how the harness can tell if your dog is excited or calm, based on heart rate, measuring happiness seems more subjective. Inupathy certainly sounds entertaining, but I think there are much better ways to understand your dog. Observing your pets' body language and habits will give you much more insight into your pup's moods.

Inupathy is expected to be available in December. What do you think about a mood harness?

Print

JoAnna Lou is a New York City-based researcher, writer and agility enthusiast.

More From The Bark

More in Lifestyle:
Pawternity and Mutternity Leave
City Bus Tour for Dogs
Rescuer or Stick Stealer?
Heartwarming Story of a Deaf Shelter Pup and His Soulmate
A Random Act of Heroism
See the World From Your Dog’s POV
Col. Mailman Befriends a Neighborhood Dog
Dog Fur of Every Color
Asking For and Accepting Help
Hundreds Join a Pup on His Last Walk