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JoAnna Lou
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One Voice Can Make a Difference
Pet lover introduces antifreeze law to protect animals in Virginia.

Last month, Virginia Governor Tim Kane, signed a bill that requires antifreeze sold in the Commonwealth to contain a bittering agent. Seven other states, Arizona, California, Maine, New Mexico, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington, have passed similar laws to discourage ingestion of the sweet-tasting liquid. According to the Humane Society Legislative Fund, approximately 10,000 pets die each year from antifreeze. The main ingredient, ethylene glycol, also poses a toxicity risk to children and wildlife.

Adding the bittering agent is certainly a step in the right direction, but I find it hard to believe that changing the flavor will prevent animals from drinking a fatal dose, which can be as little as one teaspoon. To be on the safe side, I'll be switching to antifreeze made with propylene glycol, such as Sierra, a less toxic alternative. Regardless of which version you use, being careful when handling, storing and disposing of antifreeze can prevent many tragedies.

When reading about this story, I was particularly moved by the power that a single person’s actions can have on behalf of our furry friends. When pet lover and former letter carrier Yvonne Royster learned about the accidental poisoning of two dogs on her postal route, she contacted Virginia U.S. Representative Kirk Cox who introduced the bill in January.

Many times it might seem like one person can’t make a difference, particularly when it comes to the government. But Yvonne proved that one voice can make a difference for pets all over Virginia.

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JoAnna Lou is a New York City-based researcher, writer and agility enthusiast.
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