Home
Home & Garden
Print|Text Size: ||
Pet-Friendly Design: Making Room for the Dog Dish
In a dog’s life, you eat on the floor. Except in kitchens like these, where pets are factored into the design
Pages:

Pages

When I say there is nothing quite so unpleasant as stepping in a dog’s water dish, I speak from experience (no thanks, Augie). Like a good pet owner, I keep my pup’s water bowl filled with fresh water. It’s located in the kitchen, where I inevitably get busy and distracted and step in the drink. It has happened a lot, which goes to show you really can’t teach an old dog new tricks.

When I next remodel, I’m going to plan for this condition, using the clever ideas from these fellow pet owners as inspiration.

In this project, by Buckenmeyer Architecture, finding a space for the dog dishes was a key design consideration. “A recess at one end of the island keeps the bowls out of the way,” says Marty Buckenmeyer.

Judging from the gray around his or her muzzle, I’m guessing this sweet dog is a little long in the tooth. I’m sure the elevated bowls are appreciated.

 

Hampshire Project

Photo by Haddad Hakansson Design Studio - Search traditional kitchen pictures

 

The designers at Haddad Hakansson employed a similar strategy in this kitchen, but they placed the bowls at the end of a cabinet run as opposed to an island. It’s a smart move in a kitchen that has the room. “One of the highlights of this space is the custom dog dishes,” the designers write. They are “inset into a small slab of white quartzite. The cabinet above has a tilt-out tray for dog treats.”

Perhaps the feature helped the space win first place in the 2014 NKBA northern New England kitchen design competition. And, as you can tell by the blur running toward the eating area, it clearly has won the popular canine vote too.

 

Details

Photo by Shannon Ggem ASID - Search eclectic kitchen pictures

 

In this kitchen, by Shannon Ggem, the lucky dog can pretend he or she is eating in the wild, thanks to a dining niche lined with artificial turf.

A closer look reveals the other features. Not only does the space have bowls printed with a grass image, but it has a faucet with an above-counter control. As the designer says: “No bending!”

 

chezerbey

 

With built-in bowls and the same material treatment as the kitchen island, this dog eating area, by Studio Zerbey Architecture + Design, is almost undercover.

 

Ideas for storing all of your pet’s stuff

Pages:

Pages

Print
Mary Jo Bowling is a Houzz contributor, writer, reader, serial remodeler.

Buckenmeyer Architecture, original photo on Houzz

More From The Bark

By
Claudia Kawczynska
By
The Bark
Garden & Dogs
By
Nancy Taylor Robson
More in Home & Garden:
199 Common Poisonous Plants to People and Pets
Home Design Inspired By Dogs
Designer Tips From A Leading Expert
7 Outdoor Pet Projects Your Dog Will Love
8 Contemporary Canine Decorating Ideas
Dog-friendly Yard Work
15 Doggone-Good Tips for a Pet Washing Station
A Romp Through Dog-Friendly Materials
Dog-Proofing Your Home: A Room-by-Room Guide