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Karen B. London
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The Power of Rescue Groups
A feel-good video makes the case

Beautiful pictures of rescue dogs who now live in loving homes make for a video with a high CQ (Cute Quotient.) And the fact that it is set to the Queen song “You’re My Best Friend” makes it captivating. I wasted an embarrassing amount of my precious writing time watching the entire video multiple times. I kept telling myself I had to know the video thoroughly before writing about it, but the truth is that I just liked watching it.

 

I love knowing that these are dogs who, though once without a family, are now cherished by the people who adopted them. Perhaps the best thing about the video is that it contains many before and after pictures. These pairs of photos allow you to see dogs in need of care and then see their well-groomed coats, healthy bodies and happy faces. My favorite pictures were of Dolly, Marco and Hotlips, but tons of others were charming, too.
 
Most of these dogs were fostered through Border Collie Rescue of Northern California, though that group was not involved in making the video. They currently have a playful, energetic dog named Mouse available for adoption to an active family. Check out his video on YouTube to see his story.
The video set to the Queen song video is thoroughly enjoyable and will make you feel good. It shows that rescue groups do terrific work getting so many great dogs into homes. And everyone familiar with rescue groups knows that they do it with small monetary budgets but with endless quantities of volunteer hours.
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Karen B. London, PhD, is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose clinical work over the last 17 years has focused on the evaluation and treatment of serious behavioral problems in dogs, especially aggression. Karen has been writing the behavior column for The Bark since 2012 and wrote The Bark’s training column and various other articles for eight years before that. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, and teaches a tropical field biology course in Costa Rica. Karen writes an animal column, The London Zoo, which appear in The Arizona Daily Sun and is the author of five books on canine training and behavior. She is working on her next book, which she expects to be published in 2017.

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