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Puppy Mill Bills Around the Country
California and North Carolina need a push.
Help fight puppy mills.

Spurred by an unprecedented puppy mill bust north of Seattle in January (read Jan Rodak’s first-hand account in The Bark, May/June 2009), Washington state legislators passed Senate Bill 5651, which limits the number of intact dogs a breeder can maintain to 25 and establishes requirements for their care. While it’s not a complete victory, it is progress.

Right now, California’s Assembly looks poised to follow suit. The Responsible Breeder Act (AB 241), which limits the number of intact dogs and cats a seller can maintain to 50 (which still seems like an awful lot to me), has made it through committees and could come up for a senate vote at any time. There’s still time to contact your senator. Among the organizations supporting the legislation are the ASPCA, Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and Social Compassion in Legislation (SCIL). Not surprisingly the American Kennel Club is opposed to the legislation.

North Carolina is also looking good. Senate Bill 460 would classify a commercial breeder as anyone who has 15 or more female dogs and 30 or more puppies for the purpose of sale. Breeders would have to pay $50 to get licensed and follow standards of care. The bill has passed several committee votes so far and is currently with the senate finance committee.

Efforts to regulate dog breeding in other states have not faired as well this year. A Colorado law, establishing rules for breeders with 25 dogs like Washington, was tabled indefinitely in February. A bill setting standards for commercial breeders with 10 or more dogs in Florida died in committee this spring; as did another limiting breeders to 50 dogs in Maryland. Attempts to establish a licensing requirement or inspections foundered in Illinois and Iowa, respectively.

 

Visit the United Animal Nations website to find out what’s happening in your state and who's who behind the scenes. If you live in California or North Carolina, give your rep a howl.

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Lisa Wogan lives in Seattle and is the author of, most recently, Dog Park Wisdom. lisawogan.com

 iStockphoto.

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