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Puppy Raisers Wanted
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Unsurprisingly, the question most often asked of puppy raisers by the general public is, “How can you give up this gorgeous puppy?” According to Blancett Reynolds of San Francisco, Calif., a puppy group leader who has raised six puppies for Guide Dogs for the Blind, it’s never easy. “How do I deal with it? I don’t. I cry. Actually, I can’t even say goodbye to the dog. Someone at the kennel has to take the leash from my hand because I don’t want the dog to see me lose it.”

But she adds that people often imagine the surrender of the dog to be much worse than it actually is because they don’t know how the program works. “It doesn’t involve someone handing you a puppy and then showing up at your house 15 months later to rip the dog from your arms. It’s a collaborative project with a lot of support.”

When asked for her advice to people thinking about becoming a puppy raiser, Reynolds doesn’t hesitate. “Do it!” she says. “Pick up the phone. Puppy raising isn’t always easy, but it’s fun and very rewarding. The experience is valuable for anyone. It’s all about doing something for someone else and having a great time while doing it.”
 

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This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 52: Jan/Feb 2009
Rikke Jorgensen is a freelance writer living in San Francisco.

Photo courtesy of Canine Companions for Independence®

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Submitted by Kerry | February 4 2013 |

I started puppy raising for CCI (Canine Companions for Independence) last year and find it so rewarding. The pups you meet are exceptional and can change the lives of the people they are donated to - in our case, they are completely free of charge.

There are lots of great organizations to work with, so I would definitely recommend reaching out to a group within your local area if you are thinking about it. It will be a great way to meet another puppy raiser and to ask questions to get more information.

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